Ruins of St Paul's, Macao

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    The steps up to the cathedral

    by globetrott Written Jul 13, 2014

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    There are 66 wide and solid stone-steps uphill in order to climb up the small hill, on top of which St. Pauls Cathedral was built between 1598 and 1620.
    Each and every group of tourists is going there.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    The Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral

    by globetrott Updated Jul 13, 2014

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    All that is left over of St. Paul's Cathedral in Macao is the facade of the church, that was built by Portugese Jesuit Monks in the beginning of the 17th century.
    In 1835 it was destroyed by fire that broke out after a typhoon.
    In the year 2005 the Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral became a UNESCO World Heritage because of ist great facade with fine sculptures!

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    The Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral

    by al2401 Updated Jun 20, 2010

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    Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral - Macau
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    The Ruins of St. Paul's consist of the façade of the Cathedral of St. Paul. The cathedral was built by the Portugese in the 17th century and it was dedicated to the apostle St. Paul. It is now the most famous landmark of Macau and was listed as World Heritage in 2005.

    The cathedral was built by the Jesuit monks from 1582 to 1602 and was the largest Catholic church in Asia until the importance of Macau was taken over by Hong Kong. The fortune that the cathedral once saw ebbed away at the same time. It was destroyed by fire during a typhoon in 1835.

    All that remains is the southern stone façade. The fine carving was done by Japanese Christians in exile and local craftsmen. It took 7 years from 1620 to complete. The façade sits on a small hill at the top of 66 stone steps.

    To the left side of the structure is a tiny temple - a contrast in more ways than one.

    As an icon of Macau it is worth a visit especially if you are interested in history. It is located next to the Macau Museum.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Back View of Saint Paul Ruins

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 17, 2010
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    with a staircase going to the top. The ruins now consist of the southern stone façade - intricately carved by Japanese Christians in exile from their homeland and local craftsmen between 1620 and 1627 under the direction of Italian Jesuit Carlo Spinola - and the crypts of the Jesuits who established and maintained the Cathedral. The façade sits on a small hill, with 66 stone steps leading to the façade. Ruins of St. Paul's in Macau contain a structure of five tiers. The opening tier is comprised of ten Ionic columns having three entrances. 'MATER DEI' is carved on the middle entrance. The two side entrances are adorned with bas-reliefs in the prototype of 'HIS'. The subsequent tier has ten Corinthian columns with three windows. The figures of a Catholic saint are engraved on each tabernacle between two columns. The enduring three tiers are the most ornamented. The effigy of Madonna stands at the third tier, while the sculpture of Jesus stands on the fourth. The walls are sheltered with bas-reliefs in assorted patterns like angels, symbols of crucifixion, devils and a Portuguese sailing ship. The triangular grouping of the upper three tiers replicates the Holy Trinity as well as the sacred Virgin Mary.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Iconic Ruins of Saint Paul

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 17, 2010
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    the Symbol of Macau! Saint Paul's Cathedral is a Portuguese 16th-century cathedral in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, in the People's Republic of China, dedicated to Saint Paul the apostle of Jesus. Today, its ruins IS Macau's most famous LANDMARK!.

    Built from 1582 to 1602 by the Jesuits, the Cathedral was the largest Catholic church in Asia at the time before the Manila Cathedral in the Philippines was established by the Spaniards, and the royalty of Europe vied with each other to bestow upon the Cathedral the best gifts. With the decline in importance of Macau, which was overtaken as the main port for the Pearl River Delta by Hong Kong, the Cathedral's fortune's similarly ebbed, and it was destroyed by a fire during a typhoon in 1835. The Fortaleza do Monte overlooks the ruin.

    The ruins now consist of the southern stone façade - intricately carved by Japanese Christians in exile from their homeland and local craftsmen between 1620 and 1627 under the direction of Italian Jesuit Carlo Spinola - and the crypts of the Jesuits who established and maintained the Cathedral. The façade sits on a small hill, with 66 stone steps leading to the façade.
    Ruins of St. Paul's in Macau contain a structure of five tiers. The opening tier is comprised of ten Ionic columns having three entrances. 'MATER DEI' is carved on the middle entrance. The two side entrances are adorned with bas-reliefs in the prototype of 'HIS'. The subsequent tier has ten Corinthian columns with three windows. The figures of a Catholic saint are engraved on each tabernacle between two columns. The enduring three tiers are the most ornamented. The effigy of Madonna stands at the third tier, while the sculpture of Jesus stands on the fourth. The walls are sheltered with bas-reliefs in assorted patterns like angels, symbols of crucifixion, devils and a Portuguese sailing ship. The triangular grouping of the upper three tiers replicates the Holy Trinity as well as the sacred Virgin Mary.

    It is part of the Historic Centre of Macau, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

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  • eXtian's Profile Photo

    Sao Paulo Ruins

    by eXtian Updated Apr 24, 2008

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    The Ruins of St. Paul's (Sao Paulo) stands adjacent to the famous Mount Fortress, it's handsome Baroque facade is a sight to behold.

    St. Paul's Facade has become somewhat of a centerpiece of a museum. It is situated on top of a hill, you are welcomed by a long flight of stairs. but if your knees are not up to it, just cheat and take the inclined street that parallels the stairs, there's a strip of landscaped grounds that acts as a partition, be brave... just go over it haha..

    When you pass the main facade, you can then visit the crypt, it actually houses the remains of Christian Martyrs, some religious paintings....

    If eclectic paintings and religious relics doesn’t catch your fancy.... then I'd suggest you ditch the crypts and head directly to the stairway leading towards the top of St Paul's facade.... The view is Breathtaking!

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  • chuck_taylor's Profile Photo

    Ruins of St.Paul

    by chuck_taylor Written Dec 27, 2007

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    Ruins of St. Paul
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    The funny thing about this part of my trip was that I was already smack beside the ruins and was still looking at a map post and didn't realize it. I had mixed feelings about seeing this site, because either I couldn't believe I was finally there (it was the first part of my solo trip), or I had expected much more than what I was seeing. But irregardless of this, its still part of Macaus landmark and I'm more than happy to have experienced it:)

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  • MarioPortugal's Profile Photo

    Ruins of St. Paul's - Macau's most famous landmark

    by MarioPortugal Updated Aug 12, 2007

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    The ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral turn out to be a very nice surprise. This landmark was my #1 priority to visit in Macao and once on the site I noticed the ruins were actually much prettier than I was expected. Fabulous. No doubt this facade is Macau's most famous landmark !!!

    There's a constant flow of tourists coming to this site. Mostly are, of course, from mainland China.
    Those ruins should definitely be the most photographed monument in the territory.

    -------- on wikipedia --------

    The Cathedral of Saint Paul — informally known as Saint Paul's Cathedral (Traditional Chinese: 聖保祿大教堂, commonly known as "大三巴") — was a Portuguese 16th-century cathedral in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, now in the People's Republic of China, dedicated to Saint Paul the Apostle of Jesus. Today, its ruins are one of Macau's most famous landmarks.

    Built from 1582 to 1602 by the Jesuits, the Cathedral was the largest Catholic church in Asia at the time, and the royalty of Europe vied with each other to bestow upon the Cathedral the best gifts. With the decline in importance of Macau, which was overtaken as the main port for the Pearl River Delta by Hong Kong, the Cathedral's fortunes similarly ebbed, and it was destroyed by a fire during a typhoon in 1835. The Fortaleza do Monte overlooks the ruin.
    [...]
    Since 2005, the ruins have been protected as part of the Historic Centre of Macau, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    >>> Click here for more pictures

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