Sandakan Local Customs

  • "the Catch"
    by balhannah
  • Fishing by hand held net
    Fishing by hand held net
    by balhannah
  • Local Customs
    by zrim

Best Rated Local Customs in Sandakan

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Nests

    by zrim Written Aug 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    thinking about building a nest

    Orangutans live 99% of their lives in the tree tops. They do not call any one tree or group of trees home, but are fairly nomadic, searching the jungle for the ripe and succulent fruit. In mid-afternoon the orangutans thoughts turn to the problem of where to spend the night. Each orangutan will find a likely tree and begin to prepare a nest. The orangs then commence the breaking of many branches and the building of nests. It is truly incredible to watch an orangutan tear apart the upper reaches of a tree and build his or her nest. The orangutan may stay in the nest a couple nights, but they build on average a couple hundred nests in a year. I wonder if the nest building helps the trees thrive as a form of pruning.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    The macaques are not ones to miss a party

    by zrim Written Aug 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a troop of macaques takes over (enlarge please)

    Ok, I know that all animals are great and we should enjoy all of them for their own unique talents and so on. But really, macaques are a bit like the rats of the jungle. They are scavengers and not polite scavangers. Every day the macaques would hone in on the orangutans feed. They would get impatient and force the issue before the orangs were done with their meal.

    There was a dominate macaque male who was particularly obnoxious. He would strut around the feeding platform and swat away the smaller macaques like soccer balls (they would go flying end over end into the rush when he made full contact.) Some days the male macaque would get up the nerve to challenge an orangutan. Now, orangutans are laid back, but there is a limit to their patience. On one occasion when the male macaque crossed a primate boundary he got smacked right on top of the head by a disgruntled adult orangutan. I'm sure he saw stars for several minutes. Orangutans are unbelievably strong, they can crush a coconut with their hands. So it stands to reason that they could also crush a macaque skull with their hands, if so inclined.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FISHING

    by balhannah Written Dec 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    While at the Water village we notice somebody way out in the water with a fishing net. This is the way he was catching fish.
    We were shown what he had caught, and were very surprised at the size of the Fish, as at home, we would have to throw them back into the Ocean because they were too small to keep!

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Look Ma, I can chew on my feet

    by zrim Written Aug 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    mmmm--toenail crud

    Watching the orangutans, you just get a sense of how darn close they are to humans in their habits and emotions. They can be extremely affectionate to their young, they can show anger and frustration toward the macaque monkeys who move in on their grub and they can be downright silly. In fact, I think juvenile orangutans have perfected the art of goofing off. No doubt that they would fit right in at any junior high school.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Hands or feet?

    by zrim Written Aug 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    hands or feet?

    We viewed casts of orangutan hands and feet at the visitor center. They are essentially identical. Depending on how you look at it, the orangs have four hands or four feet. Probably closer to hands since the digits seem to work more like fingers than toes and the orangs have a very difficult time walking on any of their extremities. They are climbers, not walkers.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Subject of the "hand or feet" tip

    by zrim Updated Aug 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    adult male

    My closeup was of this fellow's feet.

    I recall this male orangutan as being a loner. He is a male who was not dependent on the food, but he came down in the afternoons to visit one female and her infant. Presumably he was the father of the infant. Most full grown male orangutans are solitary creatures and keep to themselves. They are not nearly as social as you might think.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    It is safe up in the trees

    by zrim Updated Aug 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    an orangutan in its safe place

    Orangutans are arboreal animals. They are perfectly comfortable in the trees. They nest each night in the jungle canopy hundreds of feet off the jungle floor. Much of their food is found in the upper reaches of the jungle trees and there is no predator (other than man) that can harm the orangutan in the trees. Seldom will you spot an orangutan on the floor of the jungle. It is a dangerous spot for them. Not only are they slow and cumbersome walkers, but there could be a tiger around the next bend (well not these days, but historically tigers would have been a natural enemy of the orangutan).

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Words of Wisdom

    by zrim Written Feb 2, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    RESPECT THE FOREST

    RESPECT THE ORANGUTAN

    RESPECT YOURSELF

    The orangutans seem to understand these concepts...does mankind?

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Sandakan

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

113 travelers online now

Comments

Sandakan Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Sandakan local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Sandakan sightseeing.

View all Sandakan hotels