Taman Negara Kinabalu What to Pack

  • Shoes made for rambling
    Shoes made for rambling
    by skyangel_k1
  • Silicone spray for shoes
    Silicone spray for shoes
    by skyangel_k1
  • proper shoe is a must..
    proper shoe is a must..
    by p_yenyen

Most Recent What to Pack in Taman Negara Kinabalu

  • travelpug's Profile Photo

    Muscle patches

    by travelpug Written Nov 6, 2007
    Muscle patches for the aftermath of mountain climb

    Luggage and bags: Travel light. You don't need much at the top.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: layers of clothes, from t-shirt, to long sleeve shirt, jacket (better be waterproof), and rain coat (poncho). I was there on a raining day, I used my umbrella, wrapped my backpack with my rain coat.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: I suggest you bring these patches (Salonpas or Tiger Balm) for your muscle ache following the hike. It won't make the pain go away immediately, but I think it helps a little.

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Bring good shoes!

    by Pieter11 Updated May 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Slippery paths

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: The paths at Mount Kinabalu are slippery, always slippery. Because the humidity is always extremely high in the park, the paths are always wet, and when covered with leaves very slippery. Make sure you bring good, decent shoes when you want to go for a walk, even when it's a short one.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear:
    It often rains in the park. Early in the morning the sun normally shines at the top, but the rest of the day the mountain is often hidden in clouds, that produce rain. Especially when you are planning a longer walk, make sure you bring some rainclothes, or some dry clothes to get changed.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • muddybok's Profile Photo

    Flashlight & Batteries

    by muddybok Updated May 19, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Flashlight & Batteries

    Miscellaneous: You need to bring a compact flashlight & extra batteries unless you just loaded with brand new batteries.

    I keep seeing people walking in the dark due to low battery condition.

    You'll need approximately 3 hours battery life to scale the summit. So just make sure you're not one of those walking in the dark. If your battery running towards the end of the hike is still alright, but +/- half hour before & after Sayap Sayap can be quite dangerous without proper lighting and torch light.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Backpacking
    • National/State Park

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  • p_yenyen's Profile Photo

    Jacket is a must!!

    by p_yenyen Written Apr 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    proper shoe is a must..
    1 more image

    Luggage and bags: Backpack and not trolley luagage.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: jacket (when going to the peak), gloves (for icy and slippery rocks), rain coat (not for flashing, but in case if it rains), thermal wear (light and thin), head muffler(before your brain freeze up), knee guard (pressure on your knees trailing down) and proper hiking shoes.

    Photo Equipment: Camera (is a must)..

    Miscellaneous: Torch light.

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    The ultimate packing list for comfort and safety

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bags being weighed

    Luggage and bags: 1 day bag and 1 back pack.

    The whole thing weighed 6kg, and the rest were in carried a day pack (first aid kit, whistle, food & water, rain coat, insect repellant, camera, phone, tissues, note book, id).

    The rest went into the back pack for the porter.
    This is my ultimate list.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: 1 Long sleeves shirt for day 2
    2 cotton tshirts (1 for 1st day and another was what I wore to and from the airport)
    1 short sleeve thermal cum tshirt for day 2
    2 track pants (day 1 - 2)
    1 long johns (day 2 for the morning only)
    1 travel pants that I wore to and from the airport
    1 anorak, 1 light wind breaker cum parka with lining
    1 very light lambswool cardigan for nights & day 2
    1 lightweight Fleece jacket
    Sturdy hiking shoes and second pair of rubber shoes
    Leather fingerless gloves and wool gloves underneath
    Beanie
    Neck warmer
    2 pairs of cotton socks (wearinmg 2 layers is more comfortable), 1 pair of rough wool socks
    Sufficient underclothes

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Comb, ear plugs
    Microfibre towel, tooth brush, small tube of tooth paste to share with my partner, half bar of mini soap, sachet of shampoo
    Tissue paper / toilet roll
    Sun block squeezed into a plastic sachet & lip gloss, Insect repellent
    A list of first aid items (see packing tip on First aid)

    Photo Equipment: Camera / Plastic bag for camera, charger
    Mobile phone & charger

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: A couple of plastic bags (for wet clothes)
    Head torch & fresh batteries
    Whistle
    Key chain mini compass and thermometer (for fun, not required)

    Miscellaneous: Notebook and pen
    High energy food (see packing tips on food for list)
    Vitamins
    Water bottle for 500 ml
    ID/Passport in protective waterproof bag (very important)
    Travel tickets, itinerary papers, emergency contacts in plastic bag

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Keeping your things dry

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005

    Luggage and bags: I used a Silicone Water Guard spray on both my shoes (see section on Waterproofing your shoes) and selected clothes. I sprayed my backpack and jacket with the stuff and water just ran off it. Of course, in a heavy downfall, a rain jacket is still useful.

    Another tip for back packs is if you have a back pack cover. This helps in heavy rain. Some people use a large plastic bag like a garbage bag to cover their back pack. Or they use their ponchos. But always keep all your things in plastic or zip lock bags anyway, as water could still seep in. It also helps to organised and compartmentalise your things.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Ear plugs for a good night's sleep

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Ear plugs in a shared dorm

    Miscellaneous: If you are sharing a dorm at Laban Rata, it is advisable to get ear plugs. Foam ear plugs are really light and weigh almost nothing, and is most useful for several hours sleep, especially if you are a light sleeper. With people being so tired or suffering from colds, there can be some snoring going on. Or excited whispers over the day's events. Even if your dorm mates are quiet, the people outside can be quite noisy, shuffling around, joking and laughing to the wee hours of the morning.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Waterproofing your shoes

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Silicone spray for shoes

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Waterproofing your shoes is recommended in case you encounter wet weather. Even in muddy surroundings, moisture can seep into your shoes and cause discomfort. It is not comfortable walking in squishy shoes and socks for a whole day.

    I waterproofed my shoes by spraying a silicone water repellant spray on my shoes. It is called Silicone-Water-Guard Shoe Spray. It is a heavy duty water repellant for suede, leather, nylon, cotton, canvas and other fabrics. I bought it for A$10.95 from the Army Disposal Store in Chatswood, Sydney (Australia).

    Spray your shoes at least 24 hours beforehand as it will need to dry off. One coating is sufficient. The silicone repels moisture, but still allows the shoes to 'breathe'.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Shoes - a debatable issue

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Shoes made for rambling

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Someone recommended wearing simple canvas shoes rather than fancy expensive sports shoes to climb the mountain. Some would say Trekking boots rather than runners or tennis shoes. Whatever the brand of shoes, it must have the following attributes: good fit, flexible, protects the ankles, protects the toes (especially on the downhill journey).

    The porter wore simple light rubber shoes. She reckons they move with your feet and are very comfortable. The soles had small round bumps on them for friction and grip. I believe that these are sufficient for the first part of the climb, but the second part of the climb requires better grip.

    I saw one trekker coming down with his shoes tied round and round with rafia string as the soles had opened up (jaws open like a croc). Do look out for stitched soles as this would help. Also, waterproofing your shoes will aid with moisture problems (my next tip).

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Anorak - Wet weather wear for hot climates

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Anorak for rainy days

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: I got myself a very lightweight anorak that folded up really small when not in use. It was suited to rainy weather in the lowlands. For the highlands, i had a wind-breaker/parka. Some people wore a poncho, which also protected their back packs that they carried themselves.
    I prefer the anorak or raincoat, as it does not flap in the wind and is not as cumbersome to walk in.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Fuel your bodies always - energy snacks

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Energy food & snacks

    Miscellaneous: Make sure you have energy nibbles along the way, not just lunch. I had a bag of nuts, raisins, Muesli bars and chocs with me. Get coated chocolates like Smarties or M&Ms. These wont' melt and cause a mess in the heat. Food with high carbs (peanuts, macadamias, cashews) are good for immediate body fuel. Protein food (eg cereals, almonds) are great for reserves. Raisins also provide the sugar you need. Too much chocs will five you a big sugar rush and you'll feel tired later on. Eat constantly, munch along the way and drink lots (carry a 500ml bottle). If you feel a loss of appetite (due to tiredness or altitude), do take sips of water anyway, and make an effort to have some food. Your body does need it.

    Also, I packed it by Day 1 / Day 2, so I didn't have to lug all the food with me all the time. I also split it by breakfast / meal snacks vs hiking snacks, so that everything is accessible. The Up & Go in the picture was a breakfast snack that consists of 2 weet bix in a drink.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Two types of beanies - your choice

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Two types of beanies

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: These are two kinds of beanies we used. Mine was the one with flaps (wool). My husband prefered the round straighforward beanie that he got for only NZ$2.99 (acrylic) from the Warehouse - no fuss, no flaps. You can get these quite easily at the $2 shops if you are after acrylic material.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    The head loses quite a lot of heat

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Warm accessories

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Whilst we are on the topic of keeping warm and snug, the human head loses a lot of heat very quickly. I kept warm using a beanie.

    I looked around several stores and found one that also protected the ears. Short of wearing a balaclava which I find too stifling, I found that this worked perfectly for me. It was woollen with a light fleece lining and had two 'flaps' on the side. if it got too windy, I could tie the strings around me and pull up my neck warmer to protect half of my face and neck as well. So these two items were useful for the night and the second day up the mountain. (the picture also shows the neck warmer and the wool/leather gloves used).

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Keeping the neck warm against the cold wind

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005
    Neck warmer

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Instead of a scarf or muffler, we found these very useful. They are neck warmers, and trap teh heat very well. Costs about A$8-12 from the camping or army stores. The good thing is that they won't flap and be distracting in the wind as mufflers do. They just slip over your head and rest at your neck. And they are not stiffling like turtle necks could be. They are light and easy to pack.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • skyangel_k1's Profile Photo

    Keep warm - Thermals

    by skyangel_k1 Written Jul 28, 2005

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Try to keep warm without looking like a stuffed penguin. A variety of warm wear / thermals are available in the market place. I used a combination of Iceberg (NZ) merino thermal tops which look like a T-shirt and some lightweight Everwarm (NZ) long johns which are polypropylene material. With the polypropylene thermals, moisture is removed from the body whilst a layer of warmth is trapped next to the skin. With the polypropylene material, the perspiration can pass through to the next layer, so I can be kept dry and warm. The Iceberg Tee has a similar concept – breathable, light and allows moisture to pass through to keep you dry and warm and comfy.

    Cotton, on the other had, is great with the tropical humidity and absorbs perspiration very well, but it also retains it and so, the body can get quite cold at higher levels, and cotton is not as good at trapping heat.
    www.everwarm.co.nz
    www.iceberg.co.nz

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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