Unique Places in Kuala Lumpur

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by berenices
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by berenices
  • Malacca
    Malacca
    by Mikebb

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Kuala Lumpur

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    Pulau Ketam - Crab Island Day Trip

    by aussirose Written Dec 2, 2013

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    If you like adventure travel and enjoy seeing something different then Pulau Ketam could be a suitable day trip. If you love fresh seafood and photography opportunities, then Pulau Ketam should be on your 'must see' list!

    If you love off the beaten path places that are a local secret that not many tourists know about.... then look no further... and stick Pulau Ketam down on your list right now!!! :o)

    Don't worry about making your own way there.... let Patrick (our local KL driver) take you! He will ensure that your trip is delightful but still an adventure. Check out my pix here and in the travelogue below. Also, if you are really interested..... then have a squiz at my Pulau Ketam page for the full story :o) Link is at the end of my travelogue.

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    Pudu pillayar (Ganesha) Temple.

    by Askla Updated Dec 10, 2012

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    A very interesting temple which most visitors to KL misses, is the Pudu pillayar, or Ganesha temple in Jalan Pudu Lama. It is very close to the Maybank office tower. Prayers are performed at 7am/pm.
    In the first picture you can see a special arrangement made for one person who has payed for a certain amount of prayers. There are two amounts to choose from, if I remember correctly you can choose 108 or 1080 prayers. Each prayer is represented by a coconut and a porcelain shell filled with water.
    In the second and third picture you see the fire which is very important, I believe as a symbol for purity. You also see the priest pouring a little oil (or ghee) to the fire.
    Picture number four shows Ganesha beeing washed in milk. After that there are several other ways he should be washed and claened. It takes quite a long time to do all this. And it's all done twice a day. Also the last picture shows some kind of cleaning but the pic is taken from the TV-set which is put up to help people see as it is very narrow inside the temple and lots of people. In this picture you can see a white string over the back of the priest. That shows that he is a Bhraman, a chief priest. They are the only priests allowed to perform some of the rituals and they all belong to some special families.

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    Relaxing Seaside Town Port Dickson

    by aussirose Updated Dec 1, 2012

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    Half way between KL and Melaka, about 1 hour south of Kuala Lumpur is the lovely fishing town of Port Dickson. It is the beachside getaway for the locals and families and has nice shops and lovely restaurants.

    We visited Port Dickson on our way back from Melaka and if you are planning a day trip with a local driver then you should stick this destination and another one at Kelong Mamod (see my tip) on your 'must see' list.

    It seems that there are big plans for this sleepy little seaside village which will definately put it on the tourist map.... but we would prefer for this place to stay just like it is. It was enjoyable saying G'day to the local fishernen playing cards on the little jetty and watching the boats come and go.

    If you are interested, check out my travelogue below for the full story.

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    • Fishing

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    Kelong Mamod - Quaint Fishing Village KL

    by aussirose Updated Nov 10, 2012

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    If you love to discover secret off the beaten path places, maybe even something that the local city people don't even know about. A place that is natural and untouched and exuberates a feeling of serenity or peacefullness, then this is the place you need to check out!

    We were on our way back from Melaka to KL and had just visited Port Dickson on the beach (check out my tip) and wanted to discover a small quaint local fishing villlage. Our driver hit the spot!!

    And here we arrived at Kelong Mamod. Google Kelong Mamod and you will not find much...and quite understandable! If I was a local and frequented this place, I would keep it a secret too! :o)

    Anyway, we will be sure to come back and take a boat ride next time. This is definately a great off the beaten path secret tip!

    Check out the full story in my travelogue.

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    A Jungle Incident.

    by Bennytheball Updated Nov 5, 2012

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    When I was younger and more adventurous than today, I travelled through Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore, en route to Australia...........

    It was at a time of political turmoil in Indo China and the Vietnam war was approaching its cessation, but the western peninsular was peaceful and welcoming to foreign travellers.
    I travelled by train from Bangkok to Hat Yai and then by road across the border into Malaysia and on reaching Alor Setar I began my hitch-hiking journey down the jungle highway. It was easy to find lifts in cars and trucks, my ginger beard, in some rural areas, attracted a lot of attention and many superstitious villagers in the jungle swamplands regarded me as some sort of holy man and extended much hospitality towards me with food and shelter for a night or two. Young children were fascinated by my ginger beard and often queued up to touch it, I felt like quite a celebrity and revelled in my new-found status, back home everyone just regarded me as untidy, unkempt and even unwashed (not true), and often offered to buy me razor blades!

    My most outstanding memory was one evening when I had been unable to hitch a lift on the jungle highway, and with dusk descending was preparing to bed down at the roadside, when several young children appeared and were horrified at my predicament, insisting by tugging at my sleeves to accompany them to their village in the jungle. The village was a group of wooden Atap huts built on stilts above the marshland swamp to protect the inhabitants from snakes and reptiles, the children took me to the village headman's hut, and asked him to let me stay in shelter for the night. The headman spoke English, a legacy of British Colonial administration, and he made me welcome, gave me some rice and chicken to eat and a spare mattress to sleep on.

    The hut was littered with motorcycle engines in various states of repair, so being experienced as a mechanic I offered to help him with this work, which led to his invitation of hospitality being extended over the next five days. As village headman, he appeared to wield considerable power and authority over the rest of the villagers, they often came to his hut for help and advice.

    One evening, a young woman, visibly distressed, appeared and sought advice about her unfaithful husband, the headman gave her his assurance that her problem would be resolved, went to a locked cupboard, opened it to reveal a collection of hand-made rag dolls, selected one, and gave it to the woman to take home.

    The next day she returned, looking relieved and happy, to thank the headman and brought gifts of food, in gratitude. Being perplexed and at the same time intrigued to discover what was happening, I asked him to explain...........

    It transpired that he was also the village medicine man and witch doctor! The doll carried a spell which had the effect of rendering the woman's husband impotent with his other woman and the marriage was now reconciled. I was sceptical about this information but I suspect he visited the unfaithful husband and hypnotised him, but maybe not, I had already witnessed some strange things performed by Fakirs and Sadhus on my travels across India, which defied rational explanation.

    The headman was sad to see me leave, in our brief acquaintance we had become good friends, and he appreciated my mechanical skills rebuilding engines, but the jungle highway awaited and when it's time to go those itchy feet must travel onwards.......

    The good old days?..........In this case they certainly were, and educational!

    Benny.

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    Fraser's Hill

    by sheherezad Written May 15, 2012

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    If you want to go somewhere cool for a change from KL, I would suggest Fraser's Hill - for just one night or two or even a day trip! It won't be as busy as Cameron Highlands or have tea plantations but the Smokehouse Hotel is there for your English afternoon tea and it's much closer to KL..

    On the way back, you can stop for lunch at Kuala Kubu Baru (KKB) and on the way to FH you will pass by the Gap Rest House where you can take a break if you are too early for the one directional trip up (check whether it's odd or even hours to go up). The road, built by the British when they were here, winds up the contour of the hill and hugs it. You can get dizzy if you don't keep your eyes forward but imho it's very interesting! ;-)

    There is also a dam you will pass by which is nice to look at and KKB is a nice little town!

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    Culinary retreat - learn to cook Malaysian food

    by sheherezad Updated Feb 27, 2012

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    Learn how to cook Malaysia food at Bayan Indah Culinary Retreat, website: http://www.bayanindah.com/

    I used to follow them on FB, until I changed my FB settings to prevent Google from finding me on FB! ;-) Their dishes look authentic and yummy! :-)

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    Day Trip to Fraser's Hill

    by Mikebb Updated Jan 22, 2012

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    Whilst in Kuala Lumpur we took 2 day trips and both were excellent.

    Our first trip was to Fraser's Hill, a former Hill Station during colonial time, located in the highlands 100km from KL.

    The trip took just over 2 hours with the majority of time driving the one way road up to the highland.

    Upon arrival in Bukit Fraser we found a small community which still retained buildings from the British Colonial times. The landscape was green and the small town surrounded by virgin rainforest. After lunch the mist commenced its path over the rainforest and ontp parts of the town. The temperature would have been 12 C lower than Kuala Lumpur.

    We managed to fit in a hike around the town and golf course. The mist being water laden we had to put on our rain jackets. A most enjoyable day

    Full details of this day trip are on my page: Bukit Fraser

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    Have a henna tattoo!

    by berenices Updated Dec 10, 2011

    When visiting Batu Caves, ladies might want to give themselves a treat after having gone up and down those steep steps uneventfully. That's exactly what I did when I saw a woman in her stall near the entrance, displaying a sign saying henna tattoo.

    It takes all of a few minutes, though it depends too on how intricate the design you want. The artist has a collection of designs from which you can choose. The price of course depends on how complex the design is. I chose a very simple one, a butterfly on one hand. It looked nice, though I was not too impressed with the artist as she seemed to struggle a bit with the pattern. It cost 20 ringgit which seemed expensive for such a simple design which took her 3 minutes to do. Of course, this was geared more for the tourist whom they expect to be willing to shell out amounts unthinkable to the locals for such a simple and ordinary thing.

    The henna dries within an hour, and just breaks and falls off. It stays for about 4 days, and starts fading quickly after that.

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    Architecture inspired by the jungle

    by Assenczo Written Sep 10, 2011

    One seemingly mundane fact turns heads if noticed. Many modern streets have the indispensable lighting poles sticking out over the asphalt and executing the role they were designed for – namely floodlighting the road so car drivers have it easier to see where they are going. Suddenly this purely utilitarian concept has been converted into elevated appreciation of the jungle environment that Kuala Lumpur was privy to not so long ago. The light fixtures are seen from completely different angle and turned into pollen pods surrounded by colourful petals – brilliant! As if to underline the idea of fusion between city and jungle, the opulent tropical trees lining the streets are decorated for festive occasion with handing strings of lights that during the day look as hanging roots of particular kind of local tree – unique!

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    Malaysian Girls

    by machomikemd Updated May 18, 2011

    Malaysia is known for beauty and the girls here are no exception but unfortunately you would only see nicely dressed girls of Chinese and Indian Ancestry since the local Malay girls are conservatively dressed in Niqabs. For a guy who loves girl watching, Kuala Lumpur is a feast for the senses especially when viewing the pretty malaysian girls from long range hence is it an advantage to have a really powerful optical zoom camera around hence the far shots hehehe unless you would be accused of stalking if you take pictures of them really close to them.

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    Durian Chocolates!

    by machomikemd Updated May 12, 2011

    yes the King of fruits, also known as the durian can be mixed into chocolates to produce durian chocolates and these chocolates are one of the popular gifts or take away products for tourists and even locals having their durian fix with a twist. the taste of the hybrid durian chocolate is more of the durian rather than the chocolate due to it's overpowering taste hehehe but still is surprisingly good and melts in your mouth too. the price of a small box of 12 pieces of durian chocolates is RM 40 (a little more on the expensive side) and is available in malls, supermarkets and big stalls.

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    Durian

    by machomikemd Written May 11, 2011

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    the Durian fruit also known here in south east asia as the "King of Fruits" is widespread and Malaysians claim that their durian are the best, better than the durian cultivars of thailand or Indonesia and the Philippines. The is distinctive for its large size, unique odour, and formidable thorn-covered husk. The fruit can grow as large as 30 centimetres (12 in) long and 15 centimetres (6 in) in diameter, and it typically weighs one to three kilograms (2 to 7 lb). Its shape ranges from oblong to round, the colour of its husk green to brown, and its flesh pale yellow to red, depending on the species.The edible flesh emits a distinctive odor, strong and penetrating even when the husk is intact and someone said that Durian smells like hell and taste like heaven! they are available everywhere in Kuala Lumpur but are packed into microwaveable plastics or styrofoam boxes since the husks also emits a bad small hence the un peeled durian fruit is banned at hotels or malls or even bus stations and airports.

    prices ranges from RM 10 to 15 a kilo depending on the variety and add RM 1 for a microwaveable plastic container or RM 2 for a styrofoam container.

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    1930s buildings

    by Airpunk Updated May 1, 2011

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    Between the famous Bukit Bintang area and the Bukit Nanas city forest, you will find some legacy of old Kuala Lumpur. A row of houses from 1938 is left into decay. Some of the houses are still inhabited, some others are lacking vital parts already creating a spooky atmosphere. Similar to the old jail, these might be pulled down in a couple of years making place for a modern building. They are found at Jalan Raja Chulan, close to the fuel station/Changkat Raja Chulan.

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    Pudu Prison (old jail) and Pudu District

    by Airpunk Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Being built between 1891 and 1895, Pudu Prison is one of the oldest structures in today's Kuala Lumpur. The prison had always a bad reputation, especially for its small, overcrowded cells and limited ventilation through tiny windows. It was a Japanese POW camp when Malaysia was occupied in WWII and later became the place of execution in an extensively covered trial when two Australians were sentenced to death for drug trafficking. When it closed in 1996, its future became uncertain. For a short time it was a museum, but has been disused for much of the time since 1997. From then on, it got into the focus of city developers as it stands on a very lucrative sport, next to Berjaya Times Square and close to other commercially attractive areas. Although any investors and authorities would like to see the building pulled down, there are plans to conserve a part of it, one being mentioned was the prison mosque. Today, it stands as a derelict building in the centre of Kuala Lumpur with its eastern wall (with the mural paintings) pulled down. As time goes by, more parts of it are likely to disappear. If there is no chance to see anything from street level, have a look from the KL Monorail. Between the stations of Hang Tuah and Imbi (travelling towards Imbi), you will see the prison on the right hand side.
    If you are standing in front of Pudu Prison and want to travel back to a Kuala Lumpur before the era of skyscrapers, walk down Jalan Pudu to the south. There, in Pudu District, you will find a quarter with a mid-20th century atmosphere, including a street market in a mostly tourist-free area.

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