Annapurna Himal What to Pack

  • What to Pack
    by iloveadventure
  • What to Pack
    by iloveadventure
  • Always be prepared - snowstorm en route ABC
    Always be prepared - snowstorm en route...
    by darthmilmo

Most Recent What to Pack in Annapurna Himal

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    camel bag of at least 2 liters is almost A MUST!

    by iloveadventure Updated Mar 21, 2009

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    Luggage and bags: backpack for max. 12 kg. For safety (cars, air planes) I recommend a good cover for it.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: normal trekking stuff for winter and summer. during the day can be warm to 15 degrees C, but during the nights it is really cold. do now forget the down camping slippers!!! You can find it in Kathmandu for about 14 USD.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: usual stuff you always take while long trekking, depending of individual habits and medical problems.

    Photo Equipment: I strongly recommend cameras with big accumulators. Or, if you have cameras based on normal batteries and like to take pictures, take with you about 30 batteries!!! It is no joke! Even if they are new, because of cold they become inefficient. To buy batteries on the way can be a problem and even if you find, they are old and no use. Maybe 6 pictures, then you have to change them again. Very frustrating. And, if you can, take 2 different cameras with you!

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: down slippers! leggings - are very good because you protect your shoes, as in Himalaya is a lot of finest dust I ever saw in my life!

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    Water Purifying Tablets

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Now, I already had water purifying tablets with me, but in case you don’t have you should buy some as water is expensive en route. I went ahead and purify most of the time to save expenses. A litter of water ranged between 25-150 Nepalese Rupees depending on the accessibility of the place (72 Nepali Rupees = $1 USD) during the trek. You will also be saving the environment by not using too many water bottles.

    We spotted this local on the last day of the trek
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    Munchies / Snacks

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Miscellaneous: Now that I was loaded with equipment, I procured some munchies and snacks to eat along the trek. These can be purchased at a premium during the trek so it’s best to stock up for the first week or two. Make sure to include a few luxury items such as chocolate and the like to pull out during your down days on the trek. You might be roughing it out, but you can still pamper yourself once in a while no?

    A pair of mountain goats :P
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    Jacket

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: One item I couldn't have done without is a Jacket. I bought a fake waterproof North Face jacket and fleece combo for $16 USD in Pokhara. It was an essential item as I would use it just about every night we were above 2,500 meters as it got cold in the evenings. I even had to wear it several times during the day, especially when I got caught on a snow-storm in the Annapurna Base Camp. DO NOT TAKE CHANCES AND TAKE ONE!

    We sure needed a jacket right there!
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    Sunglasses

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: I went ahead and bought some sunglasses for protection of the sun as parts of the trek are above the snow-line. These glasses actually broke en route and so I was left without any for the duration of the trek. Personally, the sun didn’t affect me much. Actually, I prefer to admire a scenery with my own naked eyes.

    Thorong La Pass - that sun sure is fierce!
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    Sandals

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Another thing you can bring is a sturdy pair of sandals. I bought an excellent pair of fake Teva sandals ($7 USD) in Pokhara. I still have them to this date. There are so good that even someone who worked for Teva couldn’t tell the difference! This came handy in water crossings. They also serve as good comfortable footwear to use at night (make sure you take socks though as it does get cold at times)

    Water bufalos soaking on water along the trek
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    Don’t forget a map!

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Miscellaneous: First thing on the list was a map of the Annapurna Sanctuary, which is available for about $3 USD. It gives you the locations of towns and even mentions if you can sleep/eat there. It also provides an overall time-frame between towns. It’s an essential item to have if you’re planning a trek in that region.

    Lovely Scenery as seen from Kagbeni
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    What should I take?

    by darthmilmo Updated Jul 15, 2005

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    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Anyway, you need not take much on a trek as there are guesthouse along the way that provides food and shelter. First off, buy a map of the trek. Then, I suggest a small, comfortable, sturdy backpack and sleeping bag. You should take ample toiletries as needed (less is better though so forget about shaving, deodorant, and non-essentials… girls need not take cosmetics for example).

    Miscellaneous: Clothes wise, you do need a fleece, water proof jacket, sandals, hiking boots, plenty of sox and underwear, tuque (winter hat), gloves, zip-pants (flexible in case its warm or cold), etc. Take some snacks to get you going in the day. Also take some medicine for emergencies, including something to sanitize cuts/bruises. This should get you going. I have added a few separate tips below that hope will give you a better insight on each particular item. Think well and hard on what you will take as you will be carrying it. If you do take a porter, be mindful about him or her and pack as though you will be carrying it yourself. And remember, dress for the occasion, not to impress! Oh, do keep in mind that there are no banking facilities along the trek so budget accordingly!

    Check out my Shopping tips on what you can expect to find in Pokhara or Katmandu

    Always be prepared - snowstorm en route ABC
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    Electricity and charging batteries on the Trek

    by darthmilmo Written Jul 15, 2005

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    Photo Equipment: Oh, there is electricity on the trek so do bring your camera and charger. One thing that can be handy and weights next to nothing is a converter that allows you to tap into the light-bulb socket. That way you will be able to charge your electronic stuff in your room. Many guesthouses on the trail will have electricity and light bulb, but no regular sockets though so make sure you bring an adapter like this on the trek.

    Electricity abounds during the trail - Kagbeni
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  • Not too much!

    by Bonobo2005 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Miscellaneous: Especially if you're on a longer trip that takes you mostly to hot temperatures, you don't want to bring too much cold weather gear and clothes with you.

    In Kathmandu or Pokhara dozens of shops rent out everything you'll need for trekking in cold circomstances. Use them!

    Bringing your worn out hiking shoes/boots is necessary though as to prevent blisters and painful feet, that can destroy your trek!!

    Good trekkingsocks are for sale at much lower cost than in the West.

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Annapurna Himal What to Pack

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