Trekking, Nepal

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  • snow capped mountain in NEPAL
    snow capped mountain in NEPAL
    by NorainS
  • Kancha on day 1
    Kancha on day 1
    by into-thin-air
  • Post trek party
    Post trek party
    by into-thin-air
  • NorainS's Profile Photo

    Snow Capped Mountains and Nature

    by NorainS Written Jul 18, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Once you think about Nepal, you shouldn't miss trekking. No matter which part you go for trekking you will always find traveler just like you. Either you can go for Everest Base camp trek or heading for Annnapurna Circuit, the world highest trekking pass around 5600 m.
    When it comes to trek in himalayas in Nepal people always get mistaken as mountain climbing. In fact you are not going to climb a mountain with all those mountain gears like crampoons,harness, ice axe etc.... All you will do in trek is walking up and up and up.You shouldn't be a mountaineer to do a trek. all you need is a basic preparation like walking few hours daily. its very essential you are physically sound.Generally most of people are physically okay to go for a trek.Doing a trek is an unforgettable memories and which will makes you come back again and again because you will see the people of different minorities welcoming you with their smiles with open heart. you have a chance to chit chat with locals who are very much keen to talk and share how their life is and their customs. In general its kinds of human museum where you can explore and will come out with amazing results you never had been even think about it. Enjoy the most adventure trip in your life time.

    Fondest memory: When i was away from Nepal I always miss the snow capped mountains and surrounding of the mountains. I never forget when i was on the way to Kalapatthar, one the of place where you can view mount Everest clearly.There was snowing at that time and the chances i see Mt Everest is very low. Even though I didn't give up cause it's not easy for me to make it upto Kalapattar.I keeps on walking and walking until I reached Kalapattar almost around 5500m and i am lucky enough to have a glace of MOUNT EVEREST( 8848 m) . In a couple of second all i saw was cloud . you can't see the everest anymore cause the weather is getting worst. Though i just have a glance of Everest i feel so glad . just can't tell you how i feel after a long tiring walk.

    snow capped mountain in NEPAL
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  • into-thin-air's Profile Photo

    Why I now take a Porter/Guide on trek

    by into-thin-air Written Jul 23, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: First of all, I trekked AC, EBC from Jiri including Gokyo, Langtang and ABC including Poon Hill and then back up to Muktinath and flight out of Jomsom as an independent trekker without any trekking staff and thoroughly enjoyed my experiences.
    Then I trekked Upper Mustang and my only alternatives were to join a group, which had No Appeal or organise my own trek with trekking staff, I opted for the latter and had an Excellent time.
    So, my next trek was another one in Langtang and I decided to take along a porter/guide, this mainly because I no longer took the same enjoyment, nor felt in necessary to carry a large rucksack when for a relatively small price I could employ someone else to both carry the bulk of my gear as well as answerer a lot of my questions about the area I was trekking through.
    I also soon found out that doors that were previously closed started to open up for me, one good example was that Kancha, my Porter/Guide in Langtang told be about the Gompa above Langtang Village and took me up there, I felt so privileged as we were invited inside and sat in a corner and watched the monks that were chanting – If it hadn’t been for Kancha I wouldn’t have known about this Gompa which turned out to be one of the highlights of the trek.
    I also then took a Porter/Guide on my shortened Helambu Loop and this time was recommended a small lodge at Gul Bhanjyang which was by far the best lodge we stayed in, then as we had limited time on this trek it was our Porter/Guide that found the way back to the valley floor to shorten the loop – We could no doubt have found our own way, but it was a lot easier with having someone to keep asking the way as we were by then well of the main trekking route.
    But it was my last trek, The Arun Valley that taking along trekking staff made a Huge difference, I might well have invented a new position, that of Guide/Cook
    This was actually the cook from my Upper Mustang Trek, he was knowledgeable and spoke reasonable English and was an excellent cook, so I asked my agent if he would be prepared to carry around 15k of supplementary food and act as cook as well as guide, he happily agreed to do so and this made a huge difference to our diet as The Arun Valley is very remote and the teahouses usually only had Dal Bhat – Personally not something I would like to live on for 2 weeks ;-)
    But as well as this he guided us through a remote area where the trekking maps were often at best vague + enabled us to visit the Gompa in Sanam by getting us the key
    Then when we hit the main trail Tej had quite an easy time as we knew the way and really didn’t need a guide, but he always kept an eye on things in the kitchen and I never had a single stomach problem in 22 days trekking – This I put down to Tej

    To me it is a matter of choice, if people wish to trek independently without trekking staff then they should be allowed to do so, but f you are getting a bit older (And Possibly wiser) and your budget isn’t as tight as it once was then taking along a Porter/Guide certainly has its advantages
    However – If I hadn’t been allowed to do all my independent trekking on my earlier trips to Nepal then it is doubtful that I would have returned so many times, I expect that this also applies to a lot of other trekkers and regular visitors to Nepal – Maybe something that the rule makers that should think about before implementing the proposed changes to Independent Trekking in Nepal!!

    Kancha on day 1 Rasham in the snow Kancha the barman Kancha on the bus to Kathmandu Post trek party
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  • HimalayanSherpa's Profile Photo

    Mt Everest

    by HimalayanSherpa Written Feb 2, 2011

    Favorite thing: Hi During the mid April, you can directly can go to Syangboche from Kathmandu. Many people do not know and most of the people insist to take the helicopter flight from Kathmandu but is really expensive to charter the flight.
    If you are really looking forward to see the Mt Everest closely the best option is just take a regular flight by Tara air to Lukla and they have a connecting flight to Syangboche by Pilatus porter. Tara air base 2 pilatus porter during the main season time in Lukla. But you have to be sure it when you book the ticket in Kathmandu. They only operate if you fly Kathmandu/Lukla by Tara air. Otherwise they do not operate. The fare for Lukla/Syabgboche is abour USD 75.00 for one way.
    I also have a tour to Manche bazaar which is doing in a same way.
    Itinerary is like this
    Day 1 Fly to Lukla. Upon arrive fly to Syangboche by pilatus porter. Upon arrive trek down to Namche Bazaar. 1 hour hiking. Visit Namche village and enjoy the view of himalayan ranges incluing Mt Everest.
    Day 2 Climb up to Syangboche air strip. Fly back to Lukla by pilatus porter. Upon arrive in Lukla airport fly back to Kathmandu by regular flight.

    If you need any assistance please, do let me know.

    HimalayanSherpa

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  • reliable guide in Kathmandu

    by Bert1958 Written Apr 7, 2010

    Favorite thing: HI,
    I just returned from Nepal two weeks ago. We did the Manaslu 20 days tenttrekking and it was fantastic. We had everything organized by a Nepali guide from Kathmandu, Palsang Tamang, and he was very friendly, helpfull, honest and reliable. I would certainly recommend him. (Palsang Tamang, e-mail: palsangtamang2003@yahoo.com, cellphone: +9779841506950). He will do everything for you: pick you up from the airport, book you a good and cheap hotel, arrange the trekking permits, etc. etc. He also has a group of reliable porters, cooks, etc.
    Anyway, you'll certainly have a good vacation!
    Bert

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  • reliable guide in Kathmandu

    by Bert1958 Written Apr 7, 2010

    Favorite thing: HI,
    I just returned from Nepal two weeks ago. We did the Manaslu 20 days tenttrekking and it was fantastic. We had everything organized by a Nepali guide from Kathmandu, Palsang Tamang, and he was very friendly, helpfull, honest and reliable. I would certainly recommend him. (Palsang Tamang, e-mail: palsangtamang2003@yahoo.com, cellphone: +9779841506950). He will do everything for you: pick you up from the airport, book you a good and cheap hotel, arrange the trekking permits, etc. etc. He also has a group of reliable porters, cooks, etc.
    Anyway, you'll certainly have a good vacation!
    Bert

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  • test Blue Skies and Beaches

    by girafontheroad Written Oct 4, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Please enter the single most important activity or site you would take someone, if they had never been to Nepal before.

    Fondest memory: Please share your best memory of Nepal or what you miss the most when you are away from Nepal.

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  • Mel&Mike's Profile Photo

    Brilliant Guides

    by Mel&Mike Written Feb 23, 2007

    Favorite thing: Our trip was possible due to a great group of people including guides and porters. Joel who is apart of Project Himalaya has been in the trekking business in the Himalayas and India for years and his experience is invaluable. His Nepalese right hand man Lapka was my shadow and ensured that I was not only on the right track but warm and comfortable. His hospitabitality extended as far as his own home and we were lucky enough to visit his village, his home and have some fab potato pancakes made by his wife. Also, on the trip were our porters, who happen to be the niece and nephew of Lapka. The strength of these people was amazing and sitting by the fire with them at night was good fun. His niece had the best smile and her husband was quite experienced and had been up to the South Col and was aiming for the Summit next climbing season. Her brother, Nuro (excuse the spelling) was happy young man just starting out as a porter. He had great fun climbing at the head of the pack with Mike and the two could be seen sprinting down the mountain at a racing pace.

    Fondest memory: Its hard to pick one best thing about Nepal, the whole package of views, people and trekking is pretty hard to beat.

    Joel and the girls from Tashie's place Lapka on Kalla Pattar with Mike Last morning with the team
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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    Visa for Nepal

    by MrBill Written Dec 26, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Taking into consideration the time, hassle and expense of applying for a visa before you leave it is not worth it. You can buy your visa at the airport in Kathmandu on arrival. it costs 25 euro or $35 dollars, so it is nominally cheaper to pay in euros at $1.3000. Well, in any case, bring a passport photo along with your passport. Depending on the line it will take 15-30 minutes to pass through both passport control and get your visa. The sign also indicated that you could pay in a variety of currencies, all the major ones in any case? There is a currency exchange there where you buy your visa just in case. In general, I found all the exchange booths similar in rates and commissions. Maybe the hotels a little more.

    passport and extra photo needed
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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    water & electricity

    by MrBill Updated Dec 26, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Nepal is a poor country. Income earned from tourism is important for the local economy. But visitors also mean related problems. Nepal is also a high, alpine country with almost one-third of the country what I would consider mountainous. Although technically there is no shortage of water there is a lack of water and sewage treatment infrastructure.

    Also, parts of Nepal have a shortage of trees used for cooking and heating, so they either use dung or are now part of the electric grid. However, in this respect tourism, especially large lodges designed for foreigners, although they bring in needed income, also compete with the locals for existing electric capacity.

    The more lodges that are built, the fewer Nepalese homes that are connected to the power grid and the more they have to rely on wood as a source of fuel. Of course, this means that in a high, dry climate that de-forestation is also a serious problem that can lead to soil erosion as well. Therefore, always be mindful of how much water you use and please do not waste power. Thank you.

    help conserve water 650 kw power plant at Thame 7000 foreign visitors in October alone washing clothes on the side of the road everything gets carried including firewood
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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    choosing your guide

    by MrBill Updated Jun 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In planning our trip to Nepal for hiking and trekking we are in the process of choosing our travel company. We have hiked with ASI before in Mallorca and in La Reunion. Our experience with them has been good, but as always it depends on who you get for a guide and in which group you end up in. This time we are also considering Wikinger as we have friends that have hiked with them before and were satisfied. Comparing the trips side by side, they are very similar in their basic routes, itineraries and in cost. It will come down to availability and whether we trust ourselves to try a new company for a change.

    ASI

    Asi is the largest trekking & adventure company in Austria. Their groups are primarily aimed at German speaking hikers. ASI as it is a little more expensive tends to attract a slightly older clientele, but it depends on whether the trip is light, medium or strenuous in terms of terrain, altitude, technical difficulty, number of meters climbed and distance per day.

    ASI describes their Nepal trip as middle to strenuous (mittelere bis anspruchsvolle), but this is the first year they are choosing this new route, so they make changes to it in years to come. This typically means you will cover 500 to 800 meters per day and hike on average 3-4 hours not counting any lunch breaks or pauses.

    In this particular trip they will hike a total of 122 km over 8 hiking days. The trip itself is a total of 16 days including flights and 2 nights in Katmandu. In total you will climb 5150 meters and the trip will cost 2.725 euros or $3.434 using today's exchange rate of $1.2600.

    The one disadvantage of using an Austrian or German tour company right now is that the dollar is quite weak and the euro fairly strong, so you may pay more for your trip regardless of whether local costs in Nepal stay the same or change.

    ASI flies from Vienna to Katmandu with Austrian Airlines direct.

    www.asi.at

    Fondest memory: Wikinger

    The trip by Wikinger is remarkably similar. About 40 hours of hiking over the same distance of about 120 kms while covering slightly less vertical, only about 4300 meters versus 5150 meters. But the overall trip is at a higher altitude, from 2900 to 4550 meters, or about 1000 meters higher than the ASI trip.

    The Wikinger trip is slightly less expensive, and this is why they typically attract a slightly younger crowd. However, this particular trip is billed as a comfort trekking trip, which means hotel rooms with bathrooms instead of huts and tents with the barest of the essentials in terms of luxury. As we are going quite late in the year, November, this may be a bonus, as if we hit inclement weather, it will be nicer to be in a warm hotel instead of a cold hut.

    This is Wikinger's first year with this comfort trekking tour in Nepal as well. Their other hardcore trip is 22-days instead of 17-days with a few more actual hiking days that are longer and higher and end at the base camp at the foot of Mount Everest.

    Despite being a comfort trekking tour, Wikinger is slightly cheaper than ASI. The trip costs 2.148 euros or about $2.706 using $1.2600 as a euro exchange rate against the dollar. That is about 20% cheaper than ASI and would go along way to making up for spending money during the trip. Of course, they may be economizing elsewhere, so it is hard to compare, unless you know the standards of each hotel, meal, transfer, etc.

    On disadvantage is that Wikinger fly from Frankfurt am Main to Katmandu via Doha, which naturally makes the trip longer, but also if you come from anywhere else in Germany or Austria you also have to pay an extra 250 euros for the connecting flight. As we will be flying from Cyprus, we will try to catch a flight directly to Doha and then join the group from there? If we do not end up paying double for the airfare that is.

    www.wikinger.de

    take group, add leader, mix and go our guide Dr. Robert Lessmann Sherpa Pasand Dawa Sherpa Kayla Sherpas Kayla & Lakpa
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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Annapurna Base Camp

    by victorwkf Updated Nov 1, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Walking in the snow covered Himalayan mountains, with 360 degrees view of snowy capped mountains from 6000-8000 metres. The photograph (with my Sherpa friend) was taken at the Annapurna Base Camp. More photos & tips are at my VT Annapurna Himal page and VT Pokhara page.

    Annapurna Base Camp, Nepal
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  • BarbaraForza's Profile Photo

    Responsible tourism

    by BarbaraForza Written Sep 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Thousands of trekkers visit Himalaya each year, so potentially the damage is huge. If you are an independent trekker stay in a lodge that uses kerosene, do not take hot showers more than necessary and anyway only when the water is heated with solar energy. Let's try to keep Nepal green!

    Along the trek
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  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Trekking

    by nepalgoods Updated Sep 5, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When you go to Nepal the best thing you can do is to go into the mountains. Many people in Nepal still live in villages without a road to it and without water-toilets and electricity.

    To get an idea how hard their live is and what it means to walk 3 hours or more per day to school or to the next village, hiking is the best experience.

    Annapurna Himal
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  • herzog63's Profile Photo

    Rhododendrons on the hillsides

    by herzog63 Written Jun 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Before I went to Nepal I had heard about the Rhododendron Bloom from a couple of different guide books. I wasn't there for the peak of the bloom and the area that I hiked in was being deforested at an alarming rate! I met a European Volunteer that had been there for a long time and she told me that she had seen drastic changes in the many years she had been there. I was hoping to see hillsides covered in bloom but actually only saw a few scattered on my trek.

    Rhododendron
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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Trekking

    by SirRichard Updated Feb 26, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you don't come here to meditate, you probably come for trekking!
    Popular treks from Kathmandu are the Everest Base Camp, and the Helambu and Langtang treks.
    From Pokhara, the most popular are the Annapurna Circuit and the Jomsom trek. Less-travelled alternatives require more planning, but include the Kanchenjunga Base Camp trek, the Dolpo region, Mustang and Rara Lake.

    A valley near Kathmandu
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