Durbar Square, Kathmandu

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  • Kasthamandap Temple
    Kasthamandap Temple
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Tribhuwan Museum
    Tribhuwan Museum
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Kasthamandap Temple
    Kasthamandap Temple
    by vinod-bhojak
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    Kasthamandap Temple

    by vinod-bhojak Written Jul 11, 2014
    Kasthamandap Temple
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    Another interesting religious site to see in Kathmandu Durbar Square is Kasthamandap. According to legend this structure was built using wood from a single tree. Originally a community hall, Kasthamandapa eventually became a temple dedicated to Gorakhnath. The name of capital city is named after this temple. Once a year a huge ceremony is performed in the temple. On that day people gather around the temple, and they stay up all night. The people share the legendaries stories about the temple, and enjoy themselves with different varieties of foods. This temple is one of the major tourist attractions too.

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    Tribhuwan Museum

    by vinod-bhojak Written Jul 11, 2014
    Tribhuwan Museum
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    Located in the Hanuman Dhoka Palace. This palace was the main seat of the Shah kings for many years. Here is an exhibit that highlights the life of King Tribhuvan Exquisite stone carvings, several impressive thrones, jewel-studded ornaments used for coronations, weapons, furniture, wooden temple carvings.plenty of hunting photos and a coin collection are on display at the museum. King Tribhuwan's bedroom, study and personal effects have been recreated and preserved here.

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    Shiv-Parvati Temple

    by vinod-bhojak Written Jun 22, 2014

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    Shiv-Parvati Temple
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    It is one of the famous temples in Kathmandu Durbar Square The long low building on the northern side of Durbar Square contains the beautiful shrines of Shiva and Parvati. This somewhat unusual building is believed to date from the time of Bahadur Shah. It is probably a reconstruction, the stepped platform on which it stands being considerably older than the temple itself.

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    Kumari Ghar:The Living Goddess of Nepal

    by vinod-bhojak Written Jun 22, 2014

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    Kumari Garh where the goddess live is a very nice building built in Nepali architecture style.We stood hoping for a glimpse of the Kumari but unfortunately we haven't seen Kumari.I think we were there at the wrong time...no photos are allowed anyway so we bought some postcards.The Kumari is a young girl who is believed to be the incarnation of the demon-slaying Hindu goddess Durga. dating back at least to the Middle Ages, the cult of the Kumari is popular among both Hindus and Nepalese Buddhists - another notable example of the mingling of religious traditions in Nepal. There are about 11 kumaris across Nepal, but the Kumari Devior( Raj Kumari - royal goddess) in Kathmandu is the most important.

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    Kathmandu Darbar square:cultural heritage of nepal

    by vinod-bhojak Written Jun 21, 2014

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    Kathmandu Darbar Square
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    Kathmandu Durbar Square is a excellent depiction of architecture and culture of Nepal. A spot where one learns about the Nepalese architecture and can also buy some handicrafts and its located heart of Kathmandu. You may easily find, from thamel you have to walk just 15 min. It’s a one most popular monument zone and heritage site. There are around 50 temples in the vicinity including the temple Taleju Bhawani which was brought from Indian continent by Mallas with them in around 9th Century. The Durbar is divided into two courtyards, the outer comprising Kasthamandap, Kumari Ghar, and Shiva-Parvati Temple, and the inner consisting of Hanuman Dhoka and the main palace. Important ceremonies, including the coronation of the Nepali monarch, are held in the Kathmandu Durbar Square. If you are in Kathmandu please do not missed to visit this place.Kathmandu Durbar Square is located heart of Kathmandu. You may easily find, from thamel you have to walk just 15 min. I was there so many times with mine friends. It’s a one most popular monument zone and heritage site. You have to issue entrance fee then you may visit all place. There are around 50 temples in the vicinity including the temple Taleju Bhawani which was brought from Indian continent by Mallas with them in around 9th Century. The Durbar is divided into two courtyards, the outer comprising Kasthamandap, Kumari Ghar, and Shiva-Parvati Temple, and the inner consisting of Hanuman Dhoka and the main palace. Important ceremonies, including the coronation of the Nepali monarch, are held in the Kathmandu Durbar Square.

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    durbar square

    by call_me_rhia Written Mar 3, 2014

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    durbar square is kathmandu's vibrant heart, with amazing ancient temples, a royal palace and the kumar devi's house. each temple and stupa presents the richest intricate carvings you can imagine. The square is closed to traffic, so it is pleasant to explore. Entrance is 750 rupees,, vut this includes the royal palace museum.

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    Kathmandu's Durbar Square

    by Skibbe Written Jul 28, 2012
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    Three of Nepal's major kingdoms--Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur--are all within a fairly short distance of each other. These are where the kings were crowned and ruled and the main religious ceremonies took place. Kathmandu is the one that eventually won out over the others. Most of the buildings in its square (Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square) were built in the 17th and 18th centuries though an earthquake in the last century did much damage. Some of the buildings were interesting but I admit it was my least favorite of the three I saw. Too chaotic and too many places I wanted to see that were marked "No Entry."

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    Feel the ambience of Durbar Square

    by Ramonq Written Jul 9, 2012

    This is the iconic landmark of Kathmandu and definitely one of the must-do in the city. It is actually a complex of Hindu temples, government offices and even a palace where Nepal was once ruled. This is the historical heart of Kathmandu which has a lot of character.

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    DURBAR SQUARE

    by davidjo Written Mar 29, 2012

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    DURBAR SQUARE
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    Durbar Square contains a series of palaces, courtyards and temples with quadrangles in between them. There is spectacular architecture by the Newari artists and craftsmen. The first palace was built on this site 1,800 years ago and through the centuries the buildings have been continually rebuilt. Many souvenirs are for sale in the area so bargain well. It is just interesting to find yourself a perch by one of the buildings where you can appreciate the square.

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    "Kumari Mahal" in Kathmandu Durbar Square.

    by mittoo Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Entrance to

    On Saturday(19-11-2011) was extremely lucky to get a glimpse of the "Living Child Goddess(Kumari)" at the Kumari Mahal situated in Durbar Square.The "Child Goddess" occasionally comes to the balcony of the building to wave out at tourists and at first glance i thought i was viewing a 'Toy doll", such was the unique childlike innocence beauty of the present "Living goddess" in Kathmandu.She is controlled by a monk who stares down from the balcony and tells tourists not to photograph the "Living Goddess".Photographs of the "Living Goddess" are sold in postcard form outside the building, hence the ban on personal photography.Don't forget to visit "Freak Street" which is the lane exiting from Durbar Square and the street that made Kathmandu famous as a "Backpackers Hippy Paradise" in the 1960's/70's before Thamel was developed.

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    Kala Bhairava

    by Liatris1 Updated Sep 3, 2011

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    Kala Bhairava

    North in Durbar square, there is a huge stone relief of Kala Bhairava, the fierce manifestation of Shiva, associated with annihilation. Carved from a single piece of stone the ferocious six-armed Bhairava is depicted crushing the demon Vetala underfoot. In his right hand he holds a kapala (a skull cup) while his left hand displays the vyakhyana mudra (thumb as ring finger). The Nepalis come here to settle disputes, believing that anyone who tells lies in front of Kala Bhairava will spit blood. You will se people offering, putting food in its mouth.

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    Taleju Temple

    by Maria81 Written Jul 18, 2011

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    Built in the middle of the 16th century, the temple can, unfortunately, be only seen outside by the non-Hindus (even for Hindus, entry is restricted to the Dasain festival) - it's dedicated to the protector goddess of the Malla dynasty in the 14th C.

    At over 100 ft high, the temple towers over the Durbar square, surrounded by a wall erected on one of the 12 'stages' of the structure, with richly decorated miniature temples (each with a spire) and gates. One of the reasons for such domination is that, until recent times, it was considered 'unlucky' to build a house that would be higher than the temple.

    There is also a 1,000-year old Garuda statue nearby.

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    Kathmandu Durbar Square

    by IreneMcKay Updated Feb 10, 2011

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    Young child playing with a dog in durbar square
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    Entrance is NPR300. We took our passport and photos to the site office and got a pass for our whole stay. This was useful because sometimes you want to nip off the square and back on, or come back on a different day to visit one of the square's many rooftop cafes.

    Durbar Square is really three temple filled squares next to the royal palace. Entrance to the royal palace is extra- we did not go in. The door to the royal palace is guarded by a statue of the monkey god hanuman dating from 1672. It does not look like a monkey as it is smeared with red paste and shaded by an umbrella. There is a colourful gate into the palace next to this statue. This gate is guarded by soldiers.

    There are several temples next to the gateway to the royal palace including Jagannath Mandir and Gopinath Mandir. The temples are multiroofed and generally covered with pigeons. The Black Bhairav sculpture is in this area. This fierce god with his necklace of skulls and eight arms was believed to punish anyone who lied in front of him by making them bleed to death. Criminals used to be dragged here to swear their innocence. The White Bhairab is nearby but was located behind a grating. It is only revealed during a Hindu festival when beer spills from its mouth.

    The next square contains the tall Maju Deval Shiva Temple with its three roofs and steep plinth. You can climb up this for good views over the square and surrounding streets. The nearby Navadurga Temple has a famous painted image of Shiva and Parvati gazing out over the square. Nearby is the Kasthamandap - house of wood. Kasthamandap marks the very centre of the city. It gave its name to Kathmandu and is said to have been constructed from a single piece of wood.

    The Kumari Bahal (house of the Living Goddess) is nearby. You can enter the courtyard of this house and can take pictures as long as the living goddess is not at the window. It is forbidden to take a picture of the goddess. The living goddess is choosen from a selection of girls aged around 4 or 5. Her feet must never touch the ground. She remains the living goddess until she starts menstruation. The Kumari Bahal has beautifully carved peacock windows.

    The final square is the Basantapur Square which is filled with trinket sellers. One side of it is lined by the walls of the royal palace.

    There are several rooftop cafes giving good views over the squares.

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    Narayan Hiti Palace of King Birendra Vir Vikram.

    by goutammitra Updated May 22, 2010

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    The palace as of today.
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    It was the Royal Palace of the Late King, His Majesty King Birendra Bir Bikram Shahdev of Nepal. The Shah kings moved to this palace from their old palace in the late 18th century. The new edifice was inaugurated in 1970 on the occasion of the wedding of His Majesty king Birendra Bir Bikram Shahdev. The palace takes its name from the Narayanhiti, a famous historic waterspout situated at the southern corner of the Palace. The Palace compound is immense, surrounded by high walls and guarded by soldiers.

    The Great King and his entire family is believed to be shot dead by using an Uzi Machine gun by Crown Prince Dipendra in 2001 at a family dinner party. Those who survived was later found dead after 3-12 months in accident. Who killed them, Prince Dipendra was already dead. Whatever it is many Nepali and Indians believe that they were assasinated by somebody close to the Royal family.

    (20.05.2010)I wrote the above lines in 2007 but then democracy in Nepal. King Gyanendra ( First cousin of King Birendra Shah Dev), who became the King after King Birendra was also ousted from the palace and the palace was converted in to a museum. I went there at 9.00AM sharp with a hope to see the palace but I was told by the sentry at the gate that it opens at 11.00AM to 3.00PM for four hours only for the visitors. I had to leave for the airport at 1.00PM , so I did not take a chance to venture. Earlier, stopping and photography was not allowed but today it is open to public. I requested the sentry to take my picture at the gate. I will have to come back again to see the palace.

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    Visiting Heritage Site Hanuman Dhoka/Durbar Sq

    by Saagar Written Mar 10, 2010

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    Durbar square
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    The original centre of Kathmandu goes by the name Basantapur, Hanuman Dhoka and Durbar Square, all denoting pretty much the same location. Like the royal squares of the other city kingdoms of Kathmandu Valley Patan, Bhaktapur and Kirtipur, Kathmandu's Durbar Square is made up of various historical royal and governmental institutions mixed with temples of different styles and ages. It is roughly L-shaped seen from a pedestrian's view. Cars are half-heartedly kept away, but local drivers pass. Surprising how many they are! The guards are better at catching tourists who have to pay a fee to enter the area. If you stay for a while, bring a passport photo and stick it to your ticket, get a stamp and you will be done with that one-time fee.

    The centre pieces appear to be Hanuman Dhoka (limited access) and the Kumari temple, but both arre hyped up compared with some of the other temples around.

    The place can be noisy and confusing, but if you have a lot of time and patience with providers of all kinds of mostly unwanted services, you'll be seeing some of the finest templescapes in the world. it is a living museum, with commercial activities, religious ceremonies and all sorts of things going on as may have been the case since the 14th century.

    My favourite is to climb atop one of the pyramid shaped pagoda temples and just enjoy the view for a while. Durbar square is a fantastic place for photography, just ask people first if it is ok.

    Durbar Sq is a good place to pick up a souvenir to them back home, just beware of the quality and price. On the actual market square there are rows upon rows of souvenir sellers - old-looking stuff, but for the most part quite recently made. Next to the square are two of Nepal's best tea shops also, Everest and Nepal Tea Shop. There is a night market toward New Road, and plentyof shopping for all kinds of clothes and knick-knacks up Asan and Indra Chowk roads.

    For a description of Durbar Sqauare and events there, look at the brochure you get with your ticket as you enter, or any guide book. If you have not seen this place, you have not seen Kathmandu - so important it is for the city's identity and history. You really need to see this.

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