Patan, Kathmandu

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  • Patan
    by Skibbe
  • Patan
    by Skibbe
  • Patan
    by Skibbe
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    Patan's Durbar Square

    by Skibbe Written Jul 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Durbar Square in Patan is said to have the best remaining examples of Newari architecture. There is a lot of Buddhist influence here and most of the buildings were erected between the 16th and 18th centuries. I especially liked the museum here, which helped me understand the history much better (I rarely hire guides because I don't trust their information and fear scams).

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    Patan

    by IreneMcKay Updated Feb 11, 2011

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    We actually walked to Patan from Kathmandu which took a couple of hours. The most interesting part of the walk was on the Kathmandu side of the Bagmati River where there was a lovely temple and an area with wild monkeys on one side and a very poor looking shanty town on the other side. The walk on the Patan side was fairly disappointing as it simply followed a main road until we reached the old part of town.

    The area south of Patan's Durbar Square was interesting. There was a street market and several colourful temples.

    Patan's Durbar Square cost 200NPR to get in. The tour guides who hang around the ticket office trying to get you to hire them turned really nasty and aggresive when we said we wanted to go round by ourselves.

    Patan's Durbar Square has a large palace most of which is now the Patan Museum (open daily except Tuesdays and public holidays from 10.30am to 4.30pm, additional entrance fee.) We did not go in the museum. We just entered one of the palace courtyards and looked at the temples outside on the square.

    One of the temples, Chyasin Deval is octagonal in shape and made of stone. It was built by the daughter of an 18th century king in memory of his eight wives who threw themselves on his funeral pyre.

    The Hari Shankar Mandir Temple has guardian stone elephants.

    A statue of a garuda faces the Krishna Mandir temple.

    The Bishwanath Mandir temple is also guarded by elephants. This temple was rebuilt after it collapsed in the monsoons in 1990.

    The final temple is the Temple of Bhimsen dedicated to the god of traders.

    There was also a sunken water spout and some trinket stalls.

    There are several rooftop cafes with good views over the square. We had a very pleasant meal in one of these.

    All of the buildings in Patan's Durbar Square were well kept and it was very pretty though fairly small. Worth visiting but avoid those aggressive guides.

    To the north of Patan's Durbar Squre Patan's Kumari Bahal - temple of the living goddess and the golden temple were also interesting.

    Temples on Patan's Durbar Square Inside one of the palace courtyards - Patan A view over Patan Durbar Square from rooftop cafe temple on the Kathmandu side of the Bagmati Bridge
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    Patan

    by PierreZA Written Feb 8, 2009

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    Patan, also known as Lalitpur, is the second largest city in the Kathmandu Valley. It is located just across the Baghmati River, only a few kilometres from Kathmandu.
    It has an extremely beautiful Durbar Square full of temples, statues etc, which I thought to be more impressive than the one in Kathmandu.
    As you make your way towards Durbar Square you will see many examples of Newari architecture.
    The city has a more relaxed atmosphere, compared to the hustle and bustle of Kathmandu.

    Also in Patan, is the Golden Temple, which is located no far from Durbar Square. This building dates back to the 1400’s.

    It costs Rs200 (Dec 2008) to enter through the city walls.

    Durbar Square - Patan The Golden Temple - Patan
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    Patan

    by xiquinho Written Dec 26, 2007

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    If not for the natural boundary of the Bagmati River, Patan would have been swallowed by Kathmandu's sprawl years ago. However, with more than 50 major temples and over a hundred monasteries, the sub-city rivals its large neighbour. The Temple of a Thousand Buddhas, with a thousand Buddha's carved into its terracotta bricks, and the Krishna Mandir with its stone carved stories from the Hindu holy books are among the highlights. Visit the Palace to see the Patan Museum, a fantastic collection of art and artefacts from Nepal's history.

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    Patan Museum - A MUST

    by josephescu Updated Jan 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Austrian funds have helped renovate the former royal palace and transform it into “one of the finest museum’s in the subcontinent”, as per LP.

    Do not even think of going to Patan and miss the museum – exhibitions are realised in a professional and didactic manner, which allows you to learn the most important gods in the Buddhist and Hindu Pantheons, how to recognise them, understand the symbolism of ritual various objects, as well as the scenes and typical positions and postures. Even the stages involved in the production of hammered sheet-metal relief designs and the “lost-wax” methods of casting the face of Buddha. And….photos are allowed inside the museum!

    Opening hours 10,30 am – 5,30 pm
    entrance fee – 250 rupees

    Can visit my Patan pages for more info, pics and tips.

    Patan Museum, Kathmandu valley the throne of the Kingof Patan Patan Museum, Kathmandu valley Ganesh, Patan Museum, Kathmandu valley Patan Museum, Kathmandu valley
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    Allow one full day for Patan…or be sorry!

    by josephescu Written Jan 28, 2007

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    When planning Patan, consider temple overload and the shopping opportunities. Therefore, allow a full long summer day in Patan, and start early morning. Commence with the Patan Durbar square and with the Patan Museum, and afterwards try and see as many as possible from the temples scattered around the city, which are depicted in the broshure you received when paying the 200 rupees entrance in the Durbar square.

    A lunch at the restaurant back in the Patan Museum (do not miss the coffee, it’s real) will give you enough strength to dive in for another round of sightseeing. Finish only after you drop dead because of too much shopping, and be sure not to miss Patan Industrial Estate (closes around 6 pm).

    Remember not to spend everything and keep 100 rupees for the taxi back in Kathmandu.

    Can visit my Patan pages for more info, pics and tips.

    statue of the King of Patan Patan Degutalle Temple, Patan Patan durbar square Patan durbar square
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    Patan - The crown jewel of the entire valley

    by josephescu Updated Jan 28, 2007

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    “The most picturesque collection of buildings that have been set up in so small a place by the piety of oriental man" as per Percival London, Patan boasts some of the finest examples of Newari architecture in Nepal, as well as the highest concentration of monuments within the valley – over 1200 temples, stupas, bahals of various shapes and sizes scattered throughout the squares and the fascinating backstreets in and outside the old city.

    The most important and visited monument of the city is Patan Durbar Square, which has been listed by UNESCO, but the other monuments such as Hiranya Varna Mahavihar (the Golden Temple) and Kumbeshwor temple definitely worth a visit.

    Can visit my Patan pages for more info, pics and tips.

    Durbar square, Patan Garuda statue at Krishna Mandir Temple,  Patan Krishna Mandir Temple,  Patan Krishna Mandir Temple,  Patan Taleju and Degutalle Temples, Patan Durbar sq.
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    Patan city - City of Arts and Crafts

    by MASRYNA Written Jan 7, 2007

    The square is full of ancient palaces, temples and shrines, noted for their exquisite carvings. Its also place of former Royal palace complex, centre of religious and social life, and houses a museum containing an array of broze statues and religious objects. One remarkable monument here is a 16th century temple dedicated to the HIndu go Krishna, buit entirely of stone.

    Patan city
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