Khyber Pass, Peshawar

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  • SHAGAI FORT...KHYBER
    SHAGAI FORT...KHYBER
    by WAHEEDASLAM
  • Bab-e-Khyber...Peshawar
    Bab-e-Khyber...Peshawar
    by WAHEEDASLAM
  • Khyber pass Bridge in view...
    Khyber pass Bridge in view...
    by WAHEEDASLAM
  • Kalashtravels's Profile Photo

    Khyber Pass

    by Kalashtravels Written Apr 21, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most famous pass of the world, the Khyber Pass, is 16 km from Peshawar. It has been, throughout history, the most important gateway to the plains of the South Asian sub-continent both for migration and invasion. Starting from the foot-hills of the Suleiman Range at the Jamrud; 11 miles from Peshawar, it extends beyond the border of Pakistan at Torkham, 36 miles away and it gradually rises to an elevation of 1,066 meters above sea level. The pass is 1 ½ km at its widest and only 16 meters at its narrowest.

    Michni Post at Khyber Pass:

    The last point “tourists” are allowed to go to is the Michni Checkpost where journalists and VIPs get briefed. Just beyond Michni Checkpost at a journey time of around half an hour is the Border at Torkham, which leads to Afghanistan.

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    KOHAT PASS

    by AliJoe Updated Jun 25, 2004

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    KOHAT PASS

    KOHAT PASS : Do not surprise, this place is a Tribal Gun Factories, whose fame has spread far and wide...about 40 Kilometers south of Peshawar in a small strip of tribal territory in the Kohat Pass.Here strange, fierce looking tribesman, their rosy complexions darkened by smoke, turn out hand made weapons including pistols, Riffles and Machineguns by primitive methods.

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    PESHAWAR'S HANDICRAFTS

    by AliJoe Updated Jun 25, 2004

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    Peshawar is famous for its handicrafts and cottage industry products. Copper jars and cups, brass trays and samovars, bellied brass water jars and pots, Chitral daggers and tribal knives, exquisite ivory products and carved-wood pieces,rare rugs and carpets, silk scarves and Kashmir shawls. There is so much to buy and one buys so much. I promise to myself, I will buy on my way back to home....yes another 5 years to go !!

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  • SHAGAI FORT

    by WAHEEDASLAM Updated May 12, 2004

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    SHAGAI FORT...KHYBER

    Shagai Fort is an imposing red fort.It was built by the British in the 1920s and is now manned by the Frontier Force.The Fort was an important base in the tribal zone of Pakistan.For many years it is the headquarters of the Khyber Rifles - the traditional guardians of the pass and it is stragically placed at the centre of the Kyber.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • BAB-E-KHYBER(GATEWAY OF KHYBER PASS)

    by WAHEEDASLAM Written May 10, 2004

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    Bab-e-Khyber...Peshawar

    Bab-e-Khyber. The Khyber Gate was built in 1964, at the mouth of the Khyber Pass, where the Jamrud Fort is also located. Once way-out of the city, today Peshawar extends through the Hayatabad bazaar, that threatens to en-gulf the Bab-e-Khyber.
    Bab-e-khyber has a great importance in the history.Great warriors, leaders of ancient history passed through its ways.

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  • HISTORICAL KHYBER PASS..

    by WAHEEDASLAM Written May 10, 2004

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    Khyber pass Bridge in view...

    The most famous pass of the world, the Khyber Pass, is 16 km from Peshawar. It has been, throughout history, the most important gateway to the plains of the South Asian sub-continent both for migration and invasion. Starting from the foot-hills of the Suleiman Range at the Jamrud; 11 miles from Peshawar, it extends beyond the border of Pakistan at Torkham, 36 miles away and it gradually rises to an elevation of 1,066 meters above sea level. The pass is 1 ? km at its widest and only 16 meters at its narrowest.
    It is not the view but the idea of the place that attracts so many people to the Khyber. The Khyber isn't at the border of Afghanistan but it stretches through the Suleiman Hills for miles on both sides. In Peshawar, you're in Government administered land. The area behind the Smuggler's bazar gives way to the Khyber Agency, one of the seven agencies which make up the Tribal areas. Signboards appear by the roadside warning motorist snot to wander off the main highway because in these Tribal areas, Pakistani Law gives way to Tribal law a few metres off the main road. Hence visitors must be accompanied with an armed escort at all times.

    The pass itself is about 25 miles long.Khyber Pass has been a silent witness to countless events in the history of mankind. As one drives though the Pass at a leisurely pace, imagination unfolds pages of history.

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    Afghanistan from the Khyber...

    by jillikins Written Dec 7, 2002

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    Afghanistan from the Khyber Pass, would be off limits these days, I should think!!
    What a marvellous engineering feat this was.Tunnels for trains, the winding road, and always a Fort on top. My husband's g/father was here in the 1890's.

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    On the way to the Khyber Pass....

    by jillikins Written Dec 7, 2002

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    On the way to the Khyber Pass. Typical scene, old forts, and walled houses, with lookouts. Several families live in these, and they come complete with gardens, where they grow veges or whatever they can in this dry place.

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    We had to get permission to go...

    by jillikins Written Dec 4, 2002

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    We had to get permission to go to the Khyber Pass, and had to have two armed guards on our small bus with us. We met some of their 'mates' also, and they allowed my husband ,Michael,to have a photo with one of their rifles!!Michael was in the Pakistani gear,he likes to get the feel of a culture!!

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    Along the pass we see men...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Along the pass we see men smuggling bicycles, these bikes will be sold in Pakistan soon. It is a kind of funny view as these bikes are only partly unpacked, they unpack them just enough so one can ride with it.

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    When you travel along the...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

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    When you travel along the Khyber Pass, you will see the big houses of the Phanthans families; they look like forts, reinforced houses, with high mud
    walls, with loopholes, with watchtowers, and a big Iron Gate. The gate is so big because it must give access to the big trucks with smuggled goods.

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    The reason they join you is...

    by filipdebont Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    The reason they join you is security. Don't forget this is Tribal Area. In this area there was (and still is) a lot of smuggling (drugs, weapons,...) and these actions aren't without risk and danger.
    As we pass the gate, we see the Jamrud fort, we are not allowed to make a photo, so next photo comes from a tourist brochure.

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    Khyber PassThis is the road...

    by filipdebont Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Khyber Pass
    This is the road from Peshawar to Kabul in Afghanistan, is one of the highlights of this region.

    The people who live along this Khyber Pass are the Phanthans (also called Pushtuns or Puktuns). These combative Phanthans have always considered themselves as a special race, a chosen people. They never were beaten; no one ever managed to subject them. The Mongols, the Afghans, The Sikhs, the British and the Russians, thy all had the worst of it. Our guide described the Phanthans as aggressively elegant, colourfully attired, hospitable and considerate, fierce in enmity, kind in friendship, and a strongly self-possessed people who are punctilious over religion yet fond of pleasure.
    This legendary Pass has played an important role on the trading roads from India via Pakistan to Afghanistan and Persia.

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    The Khyber bazaar, is full of...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The Khyber bazaar, is full of doctors, dentist and lawyers, you just can't
    miss the dentist as you can see their big billboards where they are advertising with giant dentures. This is also the departure place for the busses to the Khyber Pass and Kohat.

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    Panorama picture of the Khyber...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Panorama picture of the Khyber Pass, on the right you see the pass and a bit higher the railway with some tunnels.

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