Masjid, Peshawar

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  • By Zarin Khan
    By Zarin Khan
    by Kalashtravels
  • By Zarin Khan
    By Zarin Khan
    by Kalashtravels
  • Ali Masjid Fort - Khyber
    Ali Masjid Fort - Khyber
    by WAHEEDASLAM
  • ALI MASJID & FORT

    by WAHEEDASLAM Written May 10, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ali Masjid Fort - Khyber

    Near the narrowest point of the khyber pass, about 15 Km from Jamrud is Ali Masjid and a large fort and a british cemetry. The valley walls bear insignia of British regiments that have served here. In the cemetery here are the graves of British soldiers killed in the Second Afghan War of 1879. This was the famous battle of Ali Masjid. Regimental insignia are carved and painted on to the rock faces at several places along the road, with the Gordon Highlanders, the South Wales Borderers, and the Royal Sussex, Cheshire and Dorset regiments standing in one doughty group. After the gorge, the pass opens out into a wide fertile valley dotted with Pashtun villages. True to form, however, these villages look more like forts, with high, crenellated mud walls running between watch-towers pierced with narrow gun slits.
    The Ali Masjid Fort is located at the narrowest portion of the Khyber Pass, through which only a loaded mule or Camel could pass till as late as the mid nineteenth century. The fort was built by the British in 1890.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • MOSQUE OF MAHABAT KHAN...

    by WAHEEDASLAM Written May 10, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    MOSQUE OF MAHABAT KHAN...

    The only Mughal Mosque in Andar Shehr in Peshawar to survive the depredation of the sikhs, its entrance a narrow gateway between jewellery shops. Built in the 1670s, this beautifully proportioned Mughal structure, named after a regional governor who served under both Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb, is orthodox in design. Its open courtyard has an ablution pond in the middle and a single row of rooms around the sides. The prayer hall occupies the west side, flanked by two tall minarets. According to the turn-of-the-century Gazetteer for N.W.F.P, the minarets were frequently used in Sikh times "as a substitute for the gallows" by General Avitabile, an Italian military advisor to Ranjit Singh.. A fire that raged through the Andarshar Bazaar in 1895 (the Gazetteer continues) failed to destroy the mosque thanks only to the "unremitting efforts of the faithful". The interior of the prayer hall is sheltered beneath three low fluted domes and is lavishly and colorfully painted with floral and geometric designs.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Mahabat Khan's Mosque In the...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mahabat Khan's Mosque
    In the middle of Ander Sher Bazaar you see the entry of the Mahabat Khan's Mosque. In fact this entry is nothing more then a small gate in between the
    jewellery shops. Mahabat Khan, the governor of Peshawar, built it in 1630 during the reign of Moghal Shah Jahan.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    The open courtyard has a basin...

    by filipdebont Written Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The open courtyard has a basin for ceremonial cleaning (in the middle). A guide told us that during the Sikh-period, the minarets were used a lot as gallows.

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