Harappa Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Harappa

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    Eid Gah - Masjid

    by besal Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    Eid Gah, as it was called, appeared to have been built sometimes in between 15th and 17th century. It may have been built at the same time a sufi saint Baba Nur Shah Wali who may have lived. It was constructed utilizing the bricks from Harappa’s remains.

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    Citadel Area: Mound AB

    by besal Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    Central Area
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    Northern Area: This mound show remnants of a well planned city, revealing east-west streets, brick covered drains, and sewerage treatment area pits,. To the north and south of the streets were houses, connected with small lanes. This mound dates back to 2200 BC. Several of the bricks in the upper structures were taken away by contractors who built the Lahore-Multan rail link in 1870s.

    Central Area: The high level mound here is a result of continuous rebuilding by the inhabitants of the city. In the lower areas there are remains of a large well and bathing or washing area. Some of these wells were privately owned by well off Harappans, and some were for general public.

    Southern Area: This mound is a large area measuring 1500 x 800 feet. Houses found in this area were made of mud or baked bricks; and have been reburied to protect them from decay (unlike Moen-jo-Daro which has been excavated).

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    Granary

    by besal Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    Path leading to Granary

    Leading further north from the masjid is the remains of an old granary, which shows that the Harappans were a civilized and organized foreseeing need for storing grains and other commodities. We didn’t go that far as it was too hot, and our kids were exhausted from walking.

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    Cemetery R – 37

    by besal Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    This site was discovered in 1937 by Shastri, and further excavated by Wheeler (1946) and Dales and Keynor (1986-88). 57 graves were found in this cemetery, with pots and personal toilet instruments. The graves are of poor order, meaning they were for average citizens and dates 2600 - 1900 BC. A male skeletal was discovered here and is displayed in the museum.

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    Cemetery H Civilization

    by besal Updated Apr 26, 2010

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    New born child or a fetus
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    Excavation of this site was started in 1926 by Madho Vats, revealing several cemeteries of people who lived here. Two different levels of burial were identified.

    The upper level graves consisted of large painted jars in which the skulls and bones were buried. The fragmented skeletal remains showed that corpses were exposed to the elements, and later the bones were placed in urns. Along with these urns, smaller vessels or pots were placed around with offerings and provisions for the dead.

    In the lower levels burial, graves were made in rectangular shape, oriented in different directions; most commonly head facing east and feet pointing west. Various potteries were placed around, and were of unique shapes painted with various motifs.

    The designs on the burial urns comprised of various motif depicting peacocks, eyes, stars, birds, bulls, fish, plants and occasionally human beings.

    Cemetery H was from the final stage, and it is also believed they were the destroyer of the Harappa civilization.

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    Rakh Forest

    by besal Updated Apr 26, 2010

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    Rakh Forest
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    There are several indigenous thorn forests vegetation or the Rakhs comprising of Salvadore oleodes (Wan, Jal), Tamarix aphylla (Frash, Phalwan), Prosopis cineraria (Jund) and Capparis decidua (Kareer). Hundred years Rakhs formed one of the most remarkable landscapes of Punjab. There wood was main source of firewood, fodder, and food for the population. They also provided stability to the fragile eco-system supporting wildlife. Extension of the irrigation system, introduction of fast growing species and increasing trend towards water logging led to the disappearance of the original vegetation. Only 2% are now surviving. Hundred of trees ranging over hundreds of years are still surviving and regenerating inside the Harappa museum, protected by WWF and Punjab government (source: Harappa Museum).

    This is the site you see first when you enter the archeological site. To the left is Cemetary r-37, and going left Cemetary H and the remaining sites.

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    Harappa Museum

    by besal Updated Apr 25, 2010

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    Female Skeleton
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    A small museum houses majority of the artifacts excavated from the site. There is a female skeleton with all its ornaments, and potteries around it which depicted the burial custom of Harappans. It also houses a male skeleton excavated from Cemetery R-37.

    Fees is nominal for local, but foreigners a hefty Rs. 200.

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    Baba Nur Shah Wali Shrine

    by besal Written Apr 25, 2010

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    The shrine dates back to 17th or 18th century. The tomb is quite long, almost 9 meters. Some say that this saint was very tall. The tomb is located right behind an old mughal masjid, on path leading towards the granary.

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    History of the Subcontinent

    by pakistanibrain Written Dec 27, 2005

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    Harappa is one of the oldest cities in the subcontinent. It's been there for more than 8000 years, if I remember the words of our tourist guide correctly.

    Some of the buildings of that time are still in quite good condition and are open for visits of tourists. You enter the city through a small museum with some items that have been found when the city was freed of the sand that covered it until a few decades ago.

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    The old market

    by l_joo Updated Jan 26, 2005

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    It was quite hidden inside the town not that easy to be found from outside. The two local friends treated us some of the local melon juices and some extreme sweet desserts, I don't know what that call in name but was very sweet and I had so much.

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    Non humankind watching 3b

    by l_joo Written Aug 13, 2004

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    Non humankind watching 3b is similar tip as 3 but slightly dissimilar, if you look carefully using the way of non humankind watching to watch. This tip is actualy for Non humankind but I uploaded it anyway.

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    Humankind watching

    by l_joo Written Aug 13, 2004

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    This tip shows a VTer trying to perform one kind of kneeling techniques to make himself look more Harappanizable to entertain himself while visiting this location full of Non humankinds being watched by humankins worldwide.

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    The activity of activity

    by l_joo Written Aug 13, 2004

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    The activity of activity is an activity which we should pay more attention to. If you visit this location, this activity of activity is a must do activity to activate your activitiness of the activity of activity.....do you understand?

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    A visitor to Harappa

    by l_joo Written Aug 13, 2004

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    Here is a proof of my sandal and my foot to let you see we have a visitor coming to Harappa. This tip shows also the geological condition of how a sandal in contact with it to give our audience an impactful feel of the real Harappa.

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    Public Sexual Intercourse

    by l_joo Written Aug 13, 2004

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    Sexual intercourse on the street is very common here in Harappa town, just anywhere you like or they like. While I was watching this kind of street sexual intercoursing act. A local Harappa guy pops up from nowhere and he hurled a stick onto what I was watching. Well, they probably think this kind of sexual activity should not be seen so casually or perhaps some other reasons.

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Harappa Things to Do

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