Shahi Qila (Lahore Fort), Lahore

20 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Shahi Qila (Lahore Fort)
    by illumina
  • Shahi Qila (Lahore Fort)
    by illumina
  • Shahi Qila (Lahore Fort)
    by illumina
  • lahoree's Profile Photo

    Shahi Qila (Lahore Fort)

    by lahoree Updated Feb 14, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lahore Fort is located adjacent to Walled City of Lahore and right in front of Badshahi Mosque. Origin of fort is believed to be even before the conquest of Lahore by Mahmood of Ghazni in 1021 AD. In 1981, the fort was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is a huge architectural masterpiece measuring 1,400 feet long and 1,115 feet wide.

    See my travelogue for details and pictures.

    Was this review helpful?

  • tabrez603's Profile Photo

    THE ROYAL LIVING HERITAGE.....

    by tabrez603 Written Aug 8, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lahore fort Alamgeeri Gate view.
    3 more images

    :: ROYAL FORT- LAHORE
    Although most parts of the Royal Fort were constructed around 1566 A.D. by the Mughal Emperor, Akbar the Great, there is evidence that a mud fort was in existence here in 1021 A.D. as well, when Mahmood of Ghazna invaded this area. Akbar demolished the old mud fort and constructed most of the modern Fort, as we see it today, on the old foundations.

    The Royal Fort is rectangular. The main gates are located alongside the centre of the western and eastern walls. Every succeeding Mughal Emperor as well as the Sikhs, and the British in their turn, added a pavilion, palace or wall to the Fort. Emperor Jehangir extended the gardens and constructed the palaces that we see today in the Jehangir?s Quadrangle, while Shah-Jehan added Diwan-e-Khas, Moti Masjid (Pearl Mosque) and his own Sleeping Chambers. Aurangzeb built the impressive main gate which faces the Hazoori Bagh lying in between the Badshahi Mosque and the Fort. The Famous Sheesh Mahal or Palace of Mirrors is in the north-east corner of the Fort. This is the most beautiful palace in the Fort and is decorated with small mirrors of different colours set.

    The part of the wall of the Elephant Steps towards the Fort?s inner gate are scarred by bullet marks, bearing testimony to the Sikh Civil War of 1847 A.D.

    The Sleeping Chamber of Mai Jindan houses a very interesting museum with relics from Mughal and the Sikh periods.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - A UNESCO World Heritage Site

    by Pakistaniguy Written Jan 4, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hey! We VTers had lots of fun visiting Lahore Fort. Here in this picture u will find Matthew (zinneke) in Pakistani national dress in white on the left and Usama (xest) on the right. This was a very nice VT meeting :-)

    In this picture, these VTers are standing right in front of Dewan-e-Aam - The hall for public audience for the Mughal kings nearly 700 years back until the 19th century when the Britishers killed the king.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mughal Lahore

    by Digi Updated Feb 16, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A view of the enterance to the fort.

    Being one of the major cities of the Mughal Empire, Lahore is littered with many examples of classical Mughal architecture. Most of this can be found in the old portion of Lahore, and the centerpeice of that area is the Lahore fort.

    The fort is an extremely large complex that housed the Mughal court in the city. Within it are numerous buildings ranging from mosques, to prisons, to gardens, to halls. A lot of history is contained within, and a trip to the fort would make a great day trip.

    Despite the vast amount of sights in the fort, a lot of them are not as beautiful as they once were. Unfortunatly, a lot of the buildings were plundered in the 19th century by the British, and are only a shadow of what they once were. The fort must have been quite a spectacle at it's peak.

    The admission is about five rupees. You can hire a tour guide for about twenty five rupees. If you are a foreigner, a couple of them will probably rush to meet you. I recall seeing a Chinese gentleman escorted by about three at once.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bokhari76's Profile Photo

    Shahi Qila -The Royal Forte

    by Bokhari76 Updated Apr 17, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside Lahore Fort (Shahi Qila)
    4 more images

    Shahi Qila is situated in front of Badshahi Mosque. It is a huge forte bounding a lot of beauty. A great ancient work of architecture. Without Visiting Lahrore Forte your visit to Lahore is incomplete.

    History of Lahoe Forte is very old. Originally It was built some 1000 years ago. But current Lohore Forte was built by Mughal Emperor Akbar in 1566 AD. Then his son Jehangir added his Palace. Jahangir's son, Shahjahan, built Sheesh Mahal (Mirror Palace).

    You can see several Royal palaces, gardens, fountains, Baths, Retiring rooms of Mughal period. There is a museum inside the forte. It is also worth visiting place.

    Lahore Fort has been listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site along with Shalamar Garden since 1981.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort

    by illumina Updated Sep 22, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    In the north-western corner of the old walled city of Lahore is Shahi Qila, the royal fort, a large complex of fortifications, marble mosques and palaces. It is still uncertain how long a fort has stood on this site (archaeology suggests the area has been occupied since at least the eleventh century CE), but the current structure was established during the reign of Mughal Emperor Akbar, in the 1580s, during the period of 14 years when Lahore was his capital city. It was regularly updated by subsquent rulers, but despite later renovations and additions Akbar’s work can generally be distinguished as the red brick constructions.

    The fort is an UNESCO World Heritage site together with the Shalimar Gardens. Entrance fee for non-Pakistanis is Rs 200.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lahore Fort....

    by WAHEEDASLAM Updated May 19, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lahore fort...Lahore

    The massive walls of Lahore Fort, built by Akbar in 1560s,tower over the old city of Lahore,and the huge rectangle they define, 380 by 330 meters(1,250 by 1,080 ft), is filled with buildinds from a verity of periods.A complete tour of the fort takes about 2 hours.Opens from 9am to 4pm in winter & 9 am to 5pm in summer.The entrance is through Alamgiri Gate, the Maktab Khana (Clerks' House) is a small cloistered court surrounded by arcades in which clerks sat recording the names of visitors. The inscription outside tells that it was built by jahangir in 1618.

    The Moti Masjid (Pearl Mosque) is entered via steps rising from the comer of the large courtyard north of the Maktab Khana. This little gem was built by Shah Jahan 1644. The Diwan-e-Am (Hall of Public Audience) is an open pavilion with 40 pillars built by Shah Jahan in 1631 to shelter his subjects when they appeared before him. The marble pavilion and red sandstone balcony at the back of the Diwan-e-Am are originals built by Akbar. Here the emperor appeared daily before the public-who, in his day, crowded under a canvas awning. The serpentine sandstone brackets are typical of Akbar's commissions, with the depiction of animals showing Hindu influence and reflecting Akbar's policy of religious tolerance.His two-story Diwan-e-Khas (Hall of Private Audience), built in 1566, is behind the balcony and is reached by stairs on the tight.

    Masti (or Masjidi) Gate is cast of the Diwan-e-Am. It was the original main gate to the fort built by Akbar in 1566. Jahangir's Quadrangle, north of the Diwan-e-Am, and one of the fort's most attractive areas, was started by Akbar in 1566 and finished by Jahangir in 1617. The buildings on the east, west and south sides of the court reflect typical Akbari style, with richly carved red sandstone columns and elaborate animal-shaped brackets. Behind the buildings to the east is Akbar's Court.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • It is the historical fort of...

    by haarisonline Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is the historical fort of Pakistan,more beautiful than the red Fort in Dehli.A must see site....
    A historical site is always worth seeing .U can visit the Fort and see for yourself hoe the Mughals used to live there and how they managed their affairs.

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - Gates

    by illumina Written Sep 22, 2012
    Alamgiri Gate

    Lahore Fort has two main gates. The entrance used by most visitors today is the Alamgiri gate, facing west towards the Badshahi Mosque, which was built by Aurangzeb in 1674 as a private entrance to the royal quarters. The gate opposite it to the east is the older Masjidi Gate which was built by Emperor Akbar in 1666.

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - Diwan-i-Aam

    by illumina Written Sep 22, 2012
    1 more image

    The Diwan-i-Aam (Hall of Public Audience) was built by Shah Jahan in 1631, with an upper balcony added by Akbar. It's where the emperor would make a daily public appearance, receive official visitors and review parades.

    Sadly only the columns and footprint are original, the arches and roof being a British-era reconstruction.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - Diwan-i-Khaas

    by illumina Written Sep 22, 2012

    The elegant white marble pavilion dominating Shah Jahan's Quadrangle is known as Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of Private Audience), and was probably built by Shah Jahan for receiving guests. However, it is also sometimes referred to as Chotti Khhwabgah or Khwabgah-e-Khurd (Minor Sleeping Chamber), although this name may have been given to it during Sikh rule. Changes were made to the building at this time and during British rule; it was reconstructed during the British period restorations, utilizing the original elements, but it is likely that the roof structure was modified during reconstruction.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - Shish Mahal

    by illumina Updated Sep 22, 2012
    1 more image

    The Shish Mahal (Palace of Mirrors) was built for the empress and her court and installed with screens to conceal them from prying eyes. It was constructed by Asif Khan the then governor of Lahore for Emperor Shah Jehan in 1631-32. Embellished with mirror work, stucco tracery, gilding and pietra dura and fretwork in marble, the palace consists of a lofty spacious hall with several rooms behind and on either sides and a vast courtyard in front.

    The Shish Mahal is where the Sikh ruler Ranjit Singh constantly displayed his prize possession, the fabulous Kohinoor diamond, and arranged "grand entertainments" for his foreign visitors. It is also the pllace where after the annexation of the Punjab by the British, the sovereignty of the Punjab, along with the Kohinoor diamond, was passed into the hands of the British.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Lahore Fort - Shah Burj Gate

    by illumina Written Sep 22, 2012
    1 more image

    In addition to the two main gates giving access to the interior of the fort, is the Shah Burj (Royal Tower) Gate, which was a grand entrance to the private areas of the fort, exclusively for the use of the Emperor. Of particular note as one walks along the ramp (the Hathi Paer, or Elephant Path), is the fine painted tilework of the outer wall, known as the Picture Wall.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Mysterious Fort

    by Rezonance Written Apr 4, 2008
    4 more images

    Located opposite the Badshahi Mosque the Lahore Fort is 1400 feet long and 1115 wide. It has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site but there is uncertainty surrounding when it was built and by whom. Some archaelogical digs have suggested that the fort was built long before 1025 AD.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • kalahomme's Profile Photo

    see the under hole where there lives a spirit

    by kalahomme Written Nov 9, 2003

    there is this little hole in the fort where people have seen spirits of an old man worshipping God...people thought it was some religious old man's spirit so they went there to see him and now they have put rods infront of the holew soo ppl may not go there and bug the spirit

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Lahore

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

79 travelers online now

Comments

View all Lahore hotels