Fun things to do in Pakistan

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Pakistan

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Observing Indus Valley Civilization

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    I strongly recommend that travelers should study ancient Indus Valley Civilization and then see Pakistan as its extension in the present age.

    The civilization flourished between 3000 B.C. to 1500 B.C along the Indus River and its several tributaries in areas now comprising India, Pakistan and northeastern Afghanistan.

    In the words of Sir Mortimer Wheeler, famed British Archaeologist, "No part of the world is richer in vestiges of a varied past than Pakistan." He also writes, "Pakistan boasts of Indus Valley Civilization, which was one of the first three mature civilizations of the world".

    Whereas it’s contemporary Egyptian and Mesopotamian / Babylonian civilizations were known for their pyramids and temples / hanging gardens respectively, the Indus valley civilization was known for its city architecture. The city as well as house designs seem to be work of a central authority. All towns were designed according to one specification and individual houses too had a similar 3 rooms, one courtyard design.

    While the individual citizens of Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations were poor and lived in thatched huts, the Indus valley civilization was a 100% middle class trading society the inhabitants of which lived in the comfort of houses with an advanced drainage system and without any military, ruling or a priestly class. All its cities were therefore, self-governing in accordance with an unwritten code of law.

    Although ruins have been discovered in east Punjab in India and even up in northeastern Afghanistan, it is mainly in Pakistan that the traces of this civilization have been found in the ruins of Moen-jo-Daro, Amri (on the right bank of the Indus in Sind), Kot Diji (on the left bank), up in the plains of the Punjab at Harrapa (near the city of Sahiwal), and in Rehman Dheri near Dera Ismail Khan.

    Lack of any army probably brought the demise of this civilization also at the hands of invading marauders.

    Statue of the King Priest, Moen-jo-Daro
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    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Road Trip

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    LAHORE FORT

    by Rumi-fan Written Nov 6, 2006

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    When in Lahore visit the Lahore Fort and the Mosque (next to fort). Foreigners will pay more entry fee but its negligible really. Do take advantage of the unofficial tour guides. One man attached himself to us and took us on a tour of the Fort - his knowledge was excellent and well worth the 300 rupees ($6 AUD).

    Take time to observe the mogul architecture and detail of the artwork on the buildings.

    Lahore Fort Elephant Gate at Lahore Fort Parliament area.

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    River Rafting

    by imranthetrekker Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    One of the sports that is getting fame for almost a decade in Pakistan.
    Let me tell you something about the mountainous regions of Pakistan.
    When we look at its north, many rivers, rivulets flow across the narrow valleys which invite the adventurers to come and explore likewise river Kunhar in Kaghan valley, river Chitral in Chitral valley and Indus in the valleys of northern Pakistan.

    Personally I have done some rafting in both rivers with some groups and some parts are really challenging.

    Time:
    Best time for these rivers April and May early spring season in these parts, and the month of September.

    Rafting in Chitral
    Related to:
    • Water Sports

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    Rock Climbing

    by imranthetrekker Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    As this land is blessed with mountains and rocky ridges which invite the adventure lovers from all over the world because when one looks at their tops, they are standing with pride and asking to come and explore them.

    In 2004, we had done some climbing in Khanpur a small town located almost at the distance of 35, 40 km from Islamabad towards Karakoram Highway.
    Later on in October 2004, at Shoghore , a small village from Chitral town located at the distance of 25 Km,, enroute for Grama chashma (village of geysers at Pak afghan border) in the famous mountain range of Hindukush.

    The rocky ridges very straight and breathtaking and a real adventure is there for mountain lovers.

    Time:
    Khanpur is located in the south so it is accessible and suitable for Rock climbing all year round but for Chitral from April till September.

    In Khanpur Rock Climbing in Chitral
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    • Mountain Climbing

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    Honoring Buddhism in Pakistan

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Jul 19, 2005

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    I have uploaded one photograph of a small statue of the 'Fasting Buddha' below. This statue was discovered in the archaeological sites in the North West frontier province (NWFP).

    Buddhist civilization flourished in parts of both Afghanistan and Pakistan. whereas the statues of Buddha have been desecrated in the Taliban's Afghanistan (at Bamyan), Pakistan’s SWAT Valley of NWFP (some 100 miles north of Peshawar) still boasts of several sites, especially at its southern entrance near capital Saidu Shareef. All of the sites are still intact due mainly to the peaceful nature of swat's inhabitants.

    There, amongst other archaeological relics, you can still find a giant statue of fasting Buddha engraved on a rock of limestone. The nearby town of Marghazar with a royal palace also wears the same white color.

    Fasting Buddha
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel

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    In the capital city of Pakistan

    by imranthetrekker Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    One of the places should not be missed during a trip to Islamabad.
    One of the largest mosques in the world which can accommodate more than 70,000 people and it is pretty famous in the Muslim world because of its architecture done by a Turkish architect, Vedat Dalokay, and fund was provided by Saudi Government and it is named according to the name of the King Faisal.

    The work started on it in 1976 and completed in 1986 and interior calligraphy and mosaic work was done of the famous Pakistani artist Gul Jee.

    The focal point of the capital of Pakistan and one of the most prominent buildings not only in Islamabad but in Pakistan as well.

    Please leave your shoes at the entrance and female travelers should cover the heads with the scarves or shawls and becareful about your clothing before your visit to the mosque.

    Shah Faisal Mosque
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    A piece of architecture, Mohabbat Khan Mosque

    by imranthetrekker Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    Peshawar the city past karavans, bears great attraction to the tourists from Pakistan as well as other parts of the world.
    Let me take you to one of the attractions of the old city of Peshawar I hope that you would like it.

    In the center of Peshawar city, is located Mohabbat Khan Mosque, in the gold market from Qissa Khawani Bazar (story tellers bazaar) a narrow entrance would lead you to the mosque, one of the significant specimen of Mughal art and architecture in Peshawar.
    It was built by the governor of Peshawar, Muhabbat Khan, in 1670 during the era of great patron of art in Mughal dynasty, Shahjehan.

    Floral designs are visible inside the walls of the mosque and done by natural colours, the artisans of that period from different parts of the world.

    Muhabbat Khan Mosque, Peshawar.
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Mazar-e-Quaid in Karachi

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Feb 3, 2009

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    The best time to visit Mazar-e-Quaid, the final resting place of the Founder of the Nation, is before dusk. This allows visitors to enjoy gardens and flowers, reflecting pools, the sunset, and finally the Mausoleum lit by lights from 4 different directions. Another impressive ceremony not to be missed is changing of the guards.

    At a lower level at the side of the Mazar, there are 4 other graves, including those of the 1st murdered prime minister of the country - Liaqat Ali Khan and Quaid's sister - Fatima Jinnah.

    Unfortunately, I don't have a picture of the Mazar-e-Quaid. Therefore, I am borrowing one from member Asalaam Aleikum at travelpod.

    Pakistan is a democratic and an Islamic Republic. It was a part of British India until 1947, when the Pakistan Movement for a state for Muslims of the northwestern provinces of British India, led by Muhammad Ali Jinnah, more commomly known as Quaid-e-Azam or the Great Leader, and the Muslim League resulted in the independence and creation of the state of Pakistan.

    The idea of a separate state was first introduced by the poet philosopher Allama Iqbal in 1930. Subsequently, the name Pakistan (meaning land of pure, but actually made up of letters ‘P’ from Punjab, ‘A’ from Afghania or the Frontier Province, ‘K’ from Kashmir, ‘S’ from Sindh, and ‘Tan’ from Balochistan) was proposed in 1933.

    Pakistan is the sixth most populous country in the world. It is a fairly large country spanning over 810,000 square kilometers.

    The Mausoleum Asalaam Aleikum at travelpod
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    Day trips in Chitral

    by imranthetrekker Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    Salut Mes Amis,

    If you are in Chitral and do not have much time to make the things easily then you can hire a jeep from Chitral town and can make day trips to Kalash valleys (Birir, Bamborate and Birir) which are almost located at the drive of 2 hrs from Chitral town and within a day you can visit almost 2 valleys and come to the third valley and stay overnight there.
    Next day back to Chitral and leave for Hot spring valley (Garam Chashma) at the drive of 2 hrs from Chitral town and can stay over night there.

    A bien tot,

    Warm welcome to Pakistan
    ,

    Towards Kalash valleys
    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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    5000 YEARS OLD CITY

    by maztek Updated Sep 23, 2007

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    WORLD HERITAGE SITE

    Moen Jo daro is the site of 5000 years old Indus civilization. It is located 400 kilometers from Karachi and 26 Kilometers from the town of Larkana.

    There are 4 main archaeological areas to see in Moen Jo daro. SD area which was the administrative area, DK area which was rich residential area, VS area which was poor residential area and HR area which was the Industrial area.
    There is a rest house and a small hotel in Moen Jo Daro. It is a site which must be visited

    THE OLD CITY
    Related to:
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    • Architecture
    • Archeology

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  • babar_1's Profile Photo

    Unique Architecture Lahore)

    by babar_1 Updated Jun 6, 2005

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    The unique mughal architect is worth seen in Lahore fort. Beautifully decorated walls and top of the "Shish Mahal" (the glass palace) in Lahore fort is worth to see. The Wazir Khan Maosque in the walled city is another attrachtion.

    inside of lahore fort (www.hipakistan.com)
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Must Visit

    by maztek Written Sep 8, 2007

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    The Chitral Valley at an elevation of 1128 meters (3,700 ft) is popular with mountaineers, anglers, hunters, hikers, naturalists and anthropologists. The 7,788 meters (25,550 ft) Trichmir, the highest peak of the Hindukush mountain, dominates this 322km long exotic valley.

    Chitral district has Afghanistan on its North, South and West. A narrow strip of Afghan territory, Wakhan, separates it from Tajikistan. The tourist season in Chitral is from June to September.

    One of the major attractions of Chitral are the Kalash valleys-the home of the Kafir-Kalash or "Wearers of the Black Robe", a primitive pagan tribe. Their ancestry is enveloped in mystery and is the subject of controversy. A legend says that five soldiers of the legions of Alexander of Macedon settled in Chitral and are the progenitors of the Kafir-Kalash.

    The 3,000 strong Kafir-Kalash live in the valley of Birir, Bumburet and Rambur in the South. Bamburet, the largest and the most picturesque valley of the Kafir-Kalash, is 40km from Chitral and is connected by a jeepable road. Birir, 34km away is accessible by a jeepable road. Rambur is 32km from Chitral, the road is jeepable. The Kalash women wear black gowns of coarse cloth in summer and hand-spun wool dyed in black in winter. Their pictureque headgear is made of woollen black material decked out with cowrie shells, buttons and crowned with a large coloured feather. In parts of Greece even today some women sport a similar headcovering. The Kalash people love music and dancing particularly on occasions of their religious festivals like Joshi Chilimjusht (14th & 15th May - spring), Phool (20th - 25th September) and Chowas (18th to 21st December).

    Snow Covered Mountains Darosh Mosque
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Historical Travel

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    Sikh Gurdawara of Jogan Shah Peshawar

    by imranthetrekker Updated Mar 23, 2006

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    Salut Mes Amis,

    A Sikh Gurdawara of almost 5 centuries old, located in the old city of Peshawar and could be visited during the day time.
    It is located in a pretty complicated and populous area so better to keep some local person with you, but it is very colorful and one of the pieces of archtchitecture in the old city.

    A bien tot,

    Warm welcome to Pakistan

    ,

    Old city of Peshawar

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  • babar_1's Profile Photo

    Ancient Sites

    by babar_1 Updated Apr 15, 2004

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    For history lovers ...... Pakistan has lot to offer. From ancient Indus civilization in Mohen-jo-daro (Sindh), Gandhara civilization in Taxile (20 km from Islamabad), Islamic/Mughal civilization in Lahore and modern archtecture in Islamabad and Karach, there is endless variety for visitors.

    fasting budha in Taxila museum (from www)
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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    World heritage sites

    by babar_1 Updated Oct 2, 2004

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    Pakistan has inherited a wide array of heritage sites, six of which have been inscribed on the list of "UNESCO World Heritage Sites", A list of sites inscribed in the World Heritage List of UNO is given below:

    1. Archaeological Ruins at Moenjodaro
    (Larkana district of Sindh)
    2. Taxila (Near Islamabad)
    3. Fort and Shalimar Gardens in Lahore
    4. Rohtas Fort
    5. Buddhist Ruins of Takht-i-Bahi and Neighbouring City Remains at Sahr-i-Bahlol (15-km from Mardan city of North West Frontier Province)
    6. Historical Monuments of Thatta (Sindh)

    Shalimar garden in Lahore (from www)
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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