Baguio Local Customs

  • Vendors and people (view from the Grotto)
    Vendors and people (view from the...
    by labyrnth29

Most Recent Local Customs in Baguio

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    Riding the jeepneys

    by joiwatani Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    Like many other cities and places in the Philippines, taking the jeepney as the mode of transportation is basically part of the lives of the local residents. Many more affluent families though have their own cars driven by their own salaried drivers.

    The jeepneys usually pass through Session Road, Magsaysay Avenue or Bonifacio Street to cater to most of their passengers who are university students from St. Louis University, University of Baguio, Baguio Colleges Foundation, Baguio Central University and University of the Philippines. However, some jeepneys just loop around the side of Burnham Park.

    When taking the jeepney, you have to flag them down and the driver will stop. You say "Para, Mama!" ("Para" means stop and "Mama" means Mister or Sir!" (very complicated to explain).

    The jeepney driver will stop to the most convenient and safest place after you said "Para, Mama!"

    When paying your fare, make sure to give the exact change and pass it to the next passenger who will give it to the driver.

    Make sure to pay before you say "Para, Mama!" so the driver know that it was you who paid!

    I am not really sure how the jeepney driver can memorize all those passengers who paid and those who didn't. It's probably through years of experience as a jeepney driver.

    Some jeepney drivers are driving fast and they don't follow lanes. This causes a lot of traffic but it is just part of the culture of the jeepney drivers.

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    Canao

    by joiwatani Written Apr 27, 2009

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    Canao is still performed in Baguio City. Most of the local residents still perform Canao especially those who are more affluent.

    They do Canao on weddings. And even on funerals. Canao is an event where the host or hostess slaughter cows and pigs to offer to their Gods. There is also dancing involved and drinking of wine.

    The horns of the cows are taken out later and they save them and put them on top of the hostess' ceilings to show many cows being slaughtered. The more horns in the ceilings mean that they have more Canaos done. It also shows the economic status of the owner of the house.

    The beef and the pork are actually boiled and cut into small pieces and distributed to the attendees. They eat this by dipping it in soy sauce with lots of red chillies. They eat this with boiled rice.

    Most of the Canao are still done in the outskirts of Baguio especially in Tuba and in Sablan.

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    Speak in English rather than Tagalog

    by joiwatani Written Apr 27, 2009

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    Most Igorots and residents originally from Baguio City rarely speak in Tagalog. Most older Igorots speak and understand English better than the national language because of the influence of the Americans.

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    Prudent people

    by JaneCajuguiran Written Feb 8, 2006

    The ilocanos (the people in baguio) are known to be one of the wisest in money management. So, when buying in baguio, it might be good to ask the vendor for their last price then ask them to bring it down at least 30% more. Chances are they won't give it to you but they'd give you a price just a bit higher than what you're asking for which is definitely less than what they originally gave. but of course you have to feel your way around. the most you can get is a squirk or a head shake.

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    They call you "Ading"

    by labyrnth29 Written Mar 24, 2008
    Vendors and people (view from the Grotto)

    Usually, the vendors call you "Ading" while shopping for your "pasalubongs". (take home stuff) I'm really not sure if "Ading" is translated as brother/sister. If so, it sure is nice. :)

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Baguio Local Customs

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