Local traditions and culture in City of Manila

  • Local Customs
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  • Local Customs
    by machomikemd
  • Local Customs
    by machomikemd

Most Viewed Local Customs in City of Manila

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    How to render Respect

    by theguardianangel Updated Dec 10, 2011

    Filipinos have their own way how to give respect to the elders.
    In general, They use "ate" (female) and "kuya" (male) before they mention the name. In a family, "ate" is also used in calling their older sister, "kuya" for older brothers, "lola" (grandmother), "lolo" (grandfather), "tita"/"auntie" (aunt), "tito"/"uncle" (uncle).

    They still show respect even talking with someone they don't know by calling them "Manong" (male) and "Manang" (female).
    When having conversations with the elders (male/female), "po" and "opo" is being used. "Opo" means yes in english while "po" is being inserted during a conversation.

    The young blesses the right hand of the elderly by holding the right hand of the elder in their forehead as a sign of respect. In Filipino, they call it "Mano po". Usually this is done by they uttering the words of "Mano Po" before holding the hand of the elderly.
    This happens every after mass, when arriving or leaving the house.

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    Philippine Lengua De Gato

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Spanish influence is evident in many of the names of local Filipino baked goods, though the actual product differs from the Spanish original, which include lengua de gato, polvoron, leche flan, and brazo de mercedes.Lengua de Gato in the philippines differs in Spain since in Spain it is shaped like Ladyfingers and in France, is called Langues de chat, which are classic French cookies are oval buttery cookies, with a blonde center and lightly browned edges while in the philippines, it's a deliciously rich, tongue-shaped butter cookie. Hence, the literal translation "Cat's Tongue."

    The Best Lengua De Gato in the Philippines are made by Tartland Baguio, Based in Baguio City in the Northern Philippines!

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    Carabao Mango! World's Sweetest!

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 23, 2008

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    The Philippine Carabao Mango is the world's sweetest and juiciest mango as certified by the guiness book of world records in 1995, specifically in the Zambales province. The meat is not fibrous or pulpy unlike the Tommy Atkins of florida or the the Ataulfo Mango of Mexico (which was cross bred from carabao mangoes coming from the philippines during the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade in the 18th century) or the Alphonso Mango of India. Due to the controversy regarding the name manila mango, it is exported worldwide under the Philippine Carabao Super Mango Brand. It costs 60 pesos a kilgram here (about 3 to 4 mangoes a kilogram)

    see pictures for comparion of the "original" Philippine Carabao Mango and Mexican Ataulfo "Manila Mango"

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    Christmas Season at Manila

    by victorwkf Updated Dec 11, 2007

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    Christmas is one of the best season to visit Manila because there will be lots of decorations, shopping sales and other Christmas activities happening in the city because Philippines is predominantly a Catholic country. I was in Manila in late November 2007, and already could feel the Christmas atmosphere (and the Christmas trees and decorations are great!).

    However, there will be no snow but you get lots of beautiful beaches here :)

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    Buko-Pandan Dessert!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    First, a little background on pandan. The pandan leaf “comes from the Screwpine tree, which can be found in Madagascar, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and the tropical areas of Australia”.

    Aside from its aroma and flavor, pandan serves some medicinal value too. Buko or young Coconut isvery abundant in the philippines and we have more coconut based foods than thailand, vietnam, malaysia, indonesia or any other asian countries but we lacked the advertising and marketing aspect hence iam posting these yummy filipino foods here!

    To make buko pandan, you can either use boxed pandan-flavored gelatine or the native gulaman (gelatine) bars AND bottled pandan flavoring. If using gulaman, choose the green-colored variety.

    When buying buko (coconut), tell the vendor you want the mala-kanin kind (meaning soft) but thicker meat in contradistinction with mala-uhog which is much more tender but quite thin and runny.

    NOW for the TRIVIA: this wondeful dessert was INVENTED by noted Filipino Foodie and Chef CLAUDE TAYAG in the 1980's and was initially served to Patrons of Cafe Adriatico in Manila labelled as "Claude's Dream" (Claude Tayag and the owners of the restaurant are bosom buddies). from then it catched on and it's popularity soared and is now a staple in filipino desserts but very few know that Claude Tayag invented it.

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    Coconut Sport (Macapuno)-The Next Nata de Coco!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    The "sport fruit" of the coconut is the makapuno. It is a form of mutant coconut developed by the Philippine Coconut Authority. It has has developed macapuno trees that yield 80 per cent macapuno fruits. The trees grow in abundance in Albay where the Authority's research center is and its popularity to the other islands of the philippines. It will reach the popularity of Nata De Coco in a few years that other Asians will copy it like what they did to the Nata De Coco. (Thailand already has a macapuno island for the propagation of the coconut saplings from the philippines and vietnam is now experimenting with macapuno cross breeds in their coconuts!) Considered a delightful delicacy and largely used for making preserves and ice-cream, it cannot be kept in storage and will not germinate. It has three layers: semi-acid, soft and hard meat.

    The macapuno fruit looks like the regular coconut except that it is bigger and when you open it, it has very little or absent coconut juice. Farmers have a way of knocking on the nut to determine if they have macapuno or coconut. The macapuno meat is as thick as the coconut but softer, making it easy to grate. Macapuno is cooked with sugar, sometimes with dayap for flavor, and served as a dessert. Local ice cream makers also have macapuno flavors which they sometimes add with ube (purple yam) and Pie Makers also Make Macapuno Pie!

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    Buko Pie-Philippine Coconut Pie!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Buko pie is one of the most must-try product and specialty of Laguna Province. It is a traditional Filipino pastry style, young-coconut-filled pie. It has proven to be a popular dish for Filipinos. It is almost like a coconut cream pie, only it is made with just young coconuts (buko in Tagalog) and has no cream. The pie is made with buko meat of malakanin (soft rice consistency and texture). There are also variations of the pie, which are similar but use slightly different ingredients, such as macapuno pie (from Coconut Sport), that uses a special type of coconut which differs from ordinary coconut as it is thick and sticky. Ube (Purple Yam) can also be added to the pie to make it better!

    To make your own buko pie, first make a pastry. To make the pastry, combine flour, salt and sugar in a bowl. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Combine egg yolks and ice water and blend into flour mixture until it turns into dough. Add a little more water if dough is still crumbly. Refrigerate for 30 mixtures. With a rolling pin, roll dough thinly, about 1/4 inch thick, on a lightly floured board. Make the pastry.

    Bake the piecrust, set aside and cool. Combine pie-filling ingredients except cornstarch mixture in a deep saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly. When boiling gently, add cornstarch mixture, stirring fast, until combined mixture has thickened. Pour mixture evenly into prepared piecrust. Let cool, then refrigerate until firm. Top with toasted sweetened coconut flakes just before serving.

    Collette's Buko Pie Makes the Best Pie in Laguna Province!

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    Eat Pancit-Filipino Version of Stir Fry Noodles!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Pancit Bihon (aka Bijon) is what foreigners traditionally associate with the word "pancit": very thin rice noodles fried with soy sauce and some citrus (kalamansi) and possibly with patis (fish sauce), and some variation of sliced meat (chicken and pork), wooden ear mushrooms, squid balls and chopped vegetables. The exact Bijon composition depends on someone's recipe but usually, Chinese sausage and cabbage are the most basic ingredients in a pancit bihon.

    "Pansit" is stir-fried noodle dish, common in the Philippines, though of Chinese origin. This food is second in popularity to rice in the country. It's similar to Pad Thai thai noodles or yakisoba Japanese-style stir-fried noodles. The word pancit is derived from the Hokkien (Min Nan) word pian i sit, which literally means something conveniently cooked fast

    The first pancit that landed in the Philippines is likely to have been made from wheat noodles brought as provisions by a Chinese traders from Fujian Province. Sometime later, another Chinese merchant probably tried his hand on making his own noodles when his provisions ran out. With inquisitive natives by his side, he may have experimented with batch after batch until he produced something that looked like what he may have had in his homeland. But since rice, not wheat, was on hand, he made rice noodles. Rice starch differs in nature from wheat, having less gluten that provides that familiar “bite.” Rice noodles are whiter in color and have less “muscle” in body. But that may not have mattered much to the homesick Chinese trader; pancit was pancit, and anyway rice noodles could be had in China as well.

    There are lots of Variations for Pancit like Molo, Luglog, Palabok, Canton, Habhab, etc. it depends on the region or town you are going.

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    Mango With Sticky Rice!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Mango with sticky rice is a sweet south east asian invention. It is composed of Ripe yellow Mango with glutinous sticky rice and lye and sometimes flavored with brown sugar or coconut milk. I don't really know which country started it but it is the BEST DESSERT ever! Here in The Philippines it's called "Suman sa Lihiya at Mangga" and in Thailand, it is called "Khao Niaw Ma Muang" Look at the Pictures here for the similarities of Both! But however, as I said before, Philippine Carabao Mangoes are aknowledged by the Guiness Book of World Records as the Wolrd's Sweetest and Juiciest Mango.

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    Fruit Salad Filipino Style, Very Sweet!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Fruit salad is a dish consisting of various kinds of fruit, served either in their own juices or a syrup. In different forms fruit salad can be served as an appetizer, a side-salad, or a dessert. When served as an appetizer or as a dessert, a fruit salad is also known as a fruit cocktail.

    However, there are a number of home recipes for fruit salad that contain different kinds of fruit, or that use a different kind of sauce other than the fruit's own juice or syrup. One variation is a Waldorf-style fruit salad, which uses a mayonnaise-based sauce. Other recipes use sour cream (such as in ambrosia), yogurt or even mustard as the primary sauce ingredient. An ever-popular variation also uses whipped cream mixed in with many varieties of fruits (usually a mixture of berries), and also often include miniature marshmallows. Rojak, a Malaysian fruit salad, uses a spicy sauce with peanuts and shrimp paste.

    Here in the Philippines, The Variation is that Mostly Topical Fruits are made the main ingtredients (such as nata de coco, sugar palm, macapuno, yam, tapioca, pineapples, jackfruit, durian, papaya, pears, apples, etc.) and instead of syrup, cream is mixed with condensed milk hence the ultra sweetness of the dessert! (why many filipinos are diabetic!).

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    Philippine Dried Mangoes, World's Best!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Philippine Dried Mangoes are exported the world over. it has a sweet, slightly tangy taste that is to die for! here in the philippines, it is sold in 100 to 200 gram packs and costs 65 pesos (1.25 USD) and 90 pesos (1.99 USD). Thai dried mangoes are cheaper at 90 baht (128 pesos or 3.20 USD) per 500 grams but does not have that distinctive sweet and tangy taste of dried philippine mangoes. Mangoes grow year round in selected areas in the philippines. Dried Mangos are sold in the states at 30 ounces pack (850 grams) at $16.50 (740 pesos)

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    Pili Nut Candy, Comparable to Macadamia Nut

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    The Pili nut (Canarium ovatum), is one of 600 species in the family Burseraceae, is native to the Philippines and is abundant and wild in southern Luzon (bicol region), and in parts of Visayas and Mindanao. The most important product from pili is the kernel. When raw, it resembles the flavor of roasted pumpkin seed, and when roasted, its mild, nutty flavor and tender-crispy texture is superior to that of the almond. Pili kernel is also used in chocolate, ice cream, and baked goods. The largest buyers of pili nuts are in Hong Kong and Taiwan, the kernel is one of the major ingredients in one type of the famous Chinese festive desserts known as the "moon cake".

    It is a famous "pasalubong"(souvenir) and is available locally as plain dried nut, as Ice Crea, as caramelized candy, as a nougat and my favorite, as a candy.

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    Purple Yam "Ube" A Sweet Dessert!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    A variety of a true yam, which is known as “ube” or “ubi” in the Philippines. Ube (or ubi) is the Filipino word for purple yam (Dioscorea alata). It contains pigments that gives its violet colorIt has rough textured, dark colored skin and a light purple colored flesh. Purple yam is very gnarled looking in appearance and grows on a vine rather than underground. Purple yam is used to make ube powder, which is a starchy substance added as an ingredient to sweet baked goods, cakes, ice cream, jams, and curries. All varieties of the purple yam are used to make both sweet and savory dishes as well as ground starchy substances used as flavorings and ingredients for other foods.

    ube is cooked with sugar and eaten as a sweetened dessert or jam called ube halaya which is a bright violet color. Ube is also an ingredient in the fruity dessert halo halo, another popular Filipino dessert.

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    Puto Bumbong! Heavenly

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Puto bumbong is a purple colored glutinous rice cake steamed upright in a bamboo shaft topped with fresh grated coconut and brown sugar or even rice rolls made in specialized bamboo sections made out of pirurutong or purple sticky rice with the addition of ube (purple yam) as a coloring and flavor enhancer. It is then wrapped in banana leaves then is served after a few minutes. This steamed delicacy is served with butter or margarine, sugar (preferable the muscovado kind) and grated coconut. It is usually a christmas meal in the philippines usually served to farmers in the spanish times for Dawn Masses. It is usually paired with Bibingka (wheat flour with butter, sugar and grated coconut plus salabat (ginger tea)) but since it's popularity has sky rocketed, it is available all year round! Via Mare Restaurants make the best Puto Bumbong!

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    Bibingka! A Must Eat!

    by machomikemd Written Sep 25, 2007

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    bibingka is a Popular Filipino Cake, it was originally eaten only during the christmas season wherever the Dawn Masses (Misa De Gallo) would start but it spread in it's popularity that it is available today all year round. It is available into 3 types, the Bibingka made with Flour, The Bibingka Galapong, Made with Rice Flour and the Cassava Bibingka, made with rootcrop Cassava. It is also popular in Goa in India, East Timor and Macau where it is known as Bebinca. In the portugese version it is made with flour plus Ghee (a kind of indian butter).

    In the Filipino method of preparation, rice flour or wheat flour is used and sliced salted duck eggs plus quesong puti, a semi-soft white cheese made from carabao's milk (similar to bufala mozzarella) are added into the batter before baking (the baking process is similar to that of the bebinca). Before being served, butter or margarine is spread and sugar is sprinkled over the bibingka. It is typically served with grated coconut.

    baking the bibingka is no small matter. the batter is poured into a clay pot or coconut shell lined with banana leaf--the leaf is there to make it easier to lift the bibingka out, but it also imparts a wonderful aroma to the cake. the pot is placed on small clay coal-fired oven, and then a metal tray covered with more of the hot coal is placed on top of the pot, and the cake is carefully watched for a few minutes until it has gently risen, the cheese has melted, and the top has browned and blistered. once out, the leaf-lined cake is wrapped up in more banana leaves to keep it warm and toasty; then some newspaper, with a generous bag of grated coconut wrapped within, a final bind of twine and you are sent on your merry little way.

    Via Mare Restaurant makes the best Bibingka!

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