Intramuros, Manila

4 out of 5 stars 124 Reviews

Roxas Blvd., Manila

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  • COLONIAL HOUSES, COBBLED STREETS
    COLONIAL HOUSES, COBBLED STREETS
    by davidjo
  • OLD COBBLED STREETS
    OLD COBBLED STREETS
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  • SAN AUGUSTIN CHURCH
    SAN AUGUSTIN CHURCH
    by davidjo
  • asianbelle's Profile Photo

    The Walled City

    by asianbelle Updated May 25, 2008

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    Intramuros

    Intramuros literally means "within the walls", coined from 2 Spanish words "intra" and "muros". During the Spanish occupation of the Philippines, Intamuros became the political, religious, and military seat of the country. Churches, schools, and government offices were built including Palacio del Governador or equivalent to present day Malacanang Palace. At that time, only Spaniards and Mestizos (mixed Filipino and European) were allowed to reside within the walled city, although native Filipinos and Chinese were allowed to visit or enter Intramuros.

    During the Philippine revolt against Spanish rule, many Filipino revolutionaries, foremost is the national hero Dr. Jose Rizal, were incarcerated in the several chambers of the fort. In fact, Dr. Rizal spent his last night in one of the cellars and began his walk to his death at Luneta from Intramuros.

    The walled city was heavily bombarded during World War II, particularly towards the end of the war. Every structure within its walls lay in ruins except for San Agustin Church, considered the oldest surviving church in the Philippines.

    In the '80s, former First Lady Imelda Marcos directed the rehabilitation of Intramuros as part of her "beautification" campaign. Old buildings were refurbished, plazas and gardens were resurrected, fine dining restaurants were established, and while new buildings were constructed, they were patterned after European architecture to retain the Spanish-era influences.

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    The Church of San Agustin

    by barbskie Written Apr 27, 2008

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    The oldest stone church in the Philippines. Its construction was started in 1587 and was completed in 1607 under the supervision of the Augustinian Fathers; Francesco de Bustos, Ildefonso Perez, Diego de Avila and Brother Alonzo de Perea. The architect was Juan Macias. It has withstood many earthquakes from 1645 up to the present. It has survived the British invasion in 1762, the Spanish-American war in 1898 and the Japanese invasion in 1942.

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    Manila Cathedral

    by barbskie Written Apr 27, 2008

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    The Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, as the new Manila settlement came under the patronage of La Purisima Inmaculada Concepcion. The Church provided all the religious dealings for the new settlement.
    The original structure was made from local materials, the same used in the buildings of local native huts of the time, principally of nipa and bamboo. Later, during the first Spanish occupation of the Philippines, both the new settlement of Manila and the Church grew. On 6th February 1579, Pope Gregory XIII issued the Papal Bull establishing the Diocese of Manila. From this time onwards the Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception was elevated to the level of cathedral, under the title of Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. With the elevation to Cathedral status also came the rule of a Bishop. The Bishop of the Manila Diocese was Bishop Domingo de Salazar. In September 1581 Bishop Salazar put steps in place to start the building of the Manila Cathedral, under the advocation of the Immaculate Conception. By December 1581 the old parish church of Manila was built into the Manila Cathedral.

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    Intramuros

    by barbskie Written Apr 27, 2008
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    The walled city and the old capital of Manila. It was built in 1571 and remains monumental , a relic of the Spanish period in Philippine history. It is a city within a city, separated from the rest of Manila by its crumbling walls. This ancient capital had well-planned streets, plazas, the Governor's Palace and churches. However, many buildings were reduced to shambles in World War II. The popular point of interest in Intramuros are, the Manila Cathedral, San Agustin Church and Fort Santiago.

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    Casa Manila - a view of old Spain in new Manila

    by GenuinelyCurious Updated Apr 14, 2008

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    CASA MANILA
    Casa Manila's restoration was apparently inspired by the notorious Imelda Marcos who seemed to spare no expense re-creating a 19th century Spanish grandee's home. The 40-cm wide hardwood floor planks and the abundant Narra wood furniture are a testament to the realistic restoration of the place.

    Case Manila gives a sense of both the pace of life and the scale of support it must have taken to maintain a house in those olden days. Though not hugely comfortable by today's standards, it's clear that there was time and care given to comfort within the limits of the day's technology. The way the kitchen area works is particularly insightful and the views of the city hall from the formal entertainment area are noteworthy

    Right next door to Casa Manila is an art gallery by noted artist Amado (Odama). Take a look at his creative flights of fancy starring himself.

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    Centuries-old church maintains traditions

    by GenuinelyCurious Written Apr 14, 2008

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    SAN AGUSTIN CHURCH
    San Agustin is well worth a look if you're interested in religion, history, architecture or organ music. This church has been maintained and re-built after earthquakes and wars and is one of the oldest catholic churches in Asia.

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    Intramuros gives insight into an interesting past

    by GenuinelyCurious Written Apr 14, 2008

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    FORT SANTIAGO
    I did a walking tour of Intramuros with a friend who has a good sense of the country's history and was able to fill out the rather dry and under-documented displays on offer here with interesting side bars.

    We spent the bulk of our time in Fort Santiago where Jose Rizal, the country's inspirational poet/doctor leader was imprisoned in the last century before his execution. The site also honors the hundreds of filipinos who died at the hands of the occupying Japanese.

    The sense it gave me was the the Philippines has long been ill-used by one occupying or another or even from corrupt internal officials. There's a certain abiding hope under a lot of resignation. This site overlooking the river really doesn't make a huge difference given how few people visit, but it's an important reminder of times gone by.

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  • Intramuros- The Walled City

    by phillygirlatheart Updated Apr 11, 2008
    Fort Santiago
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    Enjoy the history and Spanish architecture of the city ,within the walls. Follow the steps of Jose Rizal,walk the grounds of Fort Santiago,sit in the garden,take a ride in a horse drawn carriage,tour the museum, San Augustin Church, watch the people and absorb, Filipino history and culture.

    Intramuros, was the first historic place that my husband and I visited together, in the country , in which he was born. He had told me about-Intramuros, his school, Letran College, the Spanish Architecture and influences that shaped the Filipino culture and his character.

    We were pressed for time- give yourself the morning to enjoy the museum, fort ruins, and lovely landscaped grounds. It is a place worth seeing and exploring.We will have to go back to visit. Lots of walking. Too hot and too much walking in the PM for my elderly father. He still enjoyed the historic site., as we did.

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    The old city inside the walls

    by muratkorman Written Mar 29, 2008

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    Just over Intramuros

    Intramuros surrounds the old Manila city with many attractions inside worth visiting such as Manila Cathedral, Fort Santiago, San Augustin Church, Casa Manila. Another interesting thing is the golf course which is just beside Intramuros. You can spend a full day visiting this area which summarizes the history of Manila at a glance.

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    San Agustin Museum

    by TSC Updated Dec 1, 2007

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    San Agustin Museum was originally a monastery that was converted into a museum in 1973. The Museum showcases Filipino, Chinese, Spanish, and Mexican art treasures.

    Entrance fee: 80 Php. Keep your ticket; you may exchange it for a complimentary drink at their coffee shop. (I got my iced tea! Thank you, San Agustin! I needed it!)

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    The Intramuros and its DARK secrets

    by michaelxxx Updated Oct 14, 2007

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    Even how many times we've been to Manila, I never bothered to visit the Intramuros, not until 2005. I finally wanted to see how it look and i dont regret it.

    The Intramuros is like the old version of Manila. You will see alot of different architextures and buildings of the past, some even since the japanese war. But for me the best part here was taking a Calessa and feeling like a tourist in my own country! I love the Calessa ride! It takes you around the Intramuros. So if your fat and lazy like me, simply take a Calessa, its a better and relaxing way to see the Intramuros!

    But did you know Intramuros has a dark secret? From what I heard, that at night, spirits of the past linger around this area, and many people seen headless ghost that are roaming around the whole Intramuros. So if your planning to go to the Intramuros at night for some romance (A popular spot for romance at night) You better beware and watch out who your kissing! It might be a ghost!

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  • bsfreeloader's Profile Photo

    Manila's Old Spanish Capital

    by bsfreeloader Written Apr 28, 2007

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    With the exception of escaping as quickly as possible, there is precious little to recommend doing in Manila. It is, however, worth visiting Intramuros. A city within a city, Intramuros is the old Spanish capital of Manila. Constructed in 1571, much of Intramuros was reduced to rubble in World War II. Some of what remains has been reconstructed, with the highlights being the Manila Cathedral, San Agustin Church, the Casa Manila Museum, and the ruins of Fort Santiago.

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  • mikoykoy's Profile Photo

    Walled City of Intramuros

    by mikoykoy Written Apr 27, 2007

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    Entrance to the Aquarium
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    Intramuros is a district in Manila which was built during the Spaniards during their colonization of the Philippines in the 16th century. The walled city served as fortress during wars.

    Presently, the Intramuros Administration restored the city and retained the old Spanish look of the vicinity although present improvements around the district are continuously seen.

    For golf enthusiasts, an 18-hole course was built on the west, south and east side of the walled city.

    Things to see:
    1) Fort Santiago
    2) Manila Cathedral
    3) San Agustin Church
    4) Manila Aquarium
    5) Club Intramuros
    6) Museums
    7) or, just roam around the area riding a horse drawn carriage (calesa) and enjoy the buildings which were reconstructed with a Spanish architecture concept

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  • mikoykoy's Profile Photo

    Baroque Church of San Agustin

    by mikoykoy Written Apr 27, 2007

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    San Agustin Church is the oldest stone church in the Philippines. It was able to stand the test of time by withstanding numerous typhoons and earthquakes and wars.

    The church is also included as part of the World Heritage Site "Baroque Churches of the Philippines" in 1993. Other churches in the Philippines included in the list are Nuestra SeƱora de la Asuncion in Santa Maria, Ilocos Sur, San Agustin Church in Paoay, Ilocos Norte and Sto. Tomas de Villanueva Church in Miag-ao, Iloilo

    Similar to Manila Cathedral, the few instances that I visit San Agustin Church is during Visita Iglesia and weddings of friends.

    I am so proud that we Filipinos still have this churches that are preserved by heritage society. I hope the church can last another century so that our grandchildren can see the difference of modern and classic architectures particularly church architectures.

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    Manila Cathedral

    by mikoykoy Updated Apr 26, 2007

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    Bell Tower
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    Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception

    The first time I went to Manila Cathedral was during our educational field trip back in the 70's. At the time, we had the chance to visit the tombs of the past archbishops of Manila. They were laid at the basement of the cathedral. I am not sure if they still allowed people to visit the place.

    Presently, the only opportunity that I visit this church is during the visita iglesia which our family never miss every year (except last 2006 because I was in Qatar). Sometimes, I also had the chance to attend wedding of relatives or friends.

    The cathedral which is the seat of the archdiocese of Manila has been rebuilt several times. From what I read the present edifice is the 6th building church constructed on the site. The previous buildings were destroyed by fire, damaged by earthquake and bombarded during the 2nd world war.

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