Fun things to do in Manila

  • lots of shops
    lots of shops
    by machomikemd
  • COLONIAL HOUSES, COBBLED STREETS
    COLONIAL HOUSES, COBBLED STREETS
    by davidjo
  • Fort Banifacio, Makati, Manila, Philippines
    Fort Banifacio, Makati, Manila,...
    by TrendsetterME

Most Viewed Things to Do in Manila

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    Ermita

    by machomikemd Written Dec 17, 2014

    Ermita District is where many of the Budget Hotels, Inns, some Major Hotel and again sleazy areas of the City of Manila Is (although most of the sleazy disco pubs and bars relocated to Pasay City and Burgos Street in Makati City). It is also home of many international restaurants serving a cornucopia of international food fare for every type of Budget, some Casinos at the Manila Pavilion Hotel and Hyatt Hotel and a Major Shopping Area, the Robinsons Place Manila and SM City Manila, and is where many of the Country's Historical Government and Churches are like San Agustin Church, Manila City Hall, Quirino Grandstand, Luneta Park and the Manila Ocean Park.

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    Monument to Legazpi and Urdaneta

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Aug 27, 2014

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    Miguel López de Legazpi was a Basque Spanish navigator and governor who established the first Spanish settlement in the East Indies when his expedition crossed the Pacific Ocean from the Viceroyalty of New Spain in modern-day Mexico, and founded Cebu on the Philippine Islands in 1565. He was the first Governor-General of Spanish East Indies which included the Philippines and other Pacific archipelagos, namely Guam and the Marianas Islands. After obtaining peace with various indigenous nations and kingdoms, Miguel López de Legazpi made Manila the capital of the Spanish East Indies in 1571.
    While his relative, Andres de Urdaneta, was a Spanish circumnavigator, explorer and Augustinian friar. As a navigator he achieved in 1536 the "second" world circumnavigation (after the first one led by Ferdinand Magellan and Juan Sebastián Elcano and their crew in 1522). Urdaneta discovered and plotted a path across the Pacific from the Philippines to Acapulco in the Viceroyalty of New Spain (present day Mexico) used by the Manila galleons, which came to be known as "Urdaneta's route." He is also considered as "protector of the Indians" for his treatment of the Filipino natives and the first prelate of the Philippine Islands

    Legazpi and Urdaneta together
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    Pasig River Ferry- A New Way to see Manila

    by machomikemd Updated Aug 7, 2014

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    the ferry service is now closed as of 2011

    Tired of the traffic and the gridlock? Take the river. It’s faster, cheaper and yes, cooler. The ferry service, a revival of the Starcraft ferry which had its heyday in the 1990s, traverses the 27-kilometer stretch of the Pasig River from Manila Bay to Laguna Bay.

    Pasig River Ferry has six stations: Guadalupe, Makati City, Hulo in Mandaluyong City; Escolta, near the LRT central station, Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP) station on the PUP campus, Lambingan and Santa Ana. The government-run Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission (PRRC) operates the stations, and charges a terminal fee of P5 per head, that is deducted from the ticket price. The stations boast of modern amenities, complete with digital swipe tickets and an air-conditioned waiting area. Uniformed guards usher passengers in and out of the station, and are courteous and accommodating.

    The boat itself is a thing of beauty; a twin-engine catamaran design with sleek lines and a modern, angular shape, wrapped around a fully air-conditioned cabin that seats 150 people in plastic chairs spread over three rows. The seats are comfortable and spacious. Onboard entertainment is provided by a single flat-screen television and a rather booming sound system. The ferry operator has set aside a bar counter for use as a mini canteen, but so far there have been no takers. It remains a nicely sculpted piece of wood at the back of the boat. An armed marshal from the Presidential Security Group (PSG) is assigned to each of the of the vessels, for security reasons, and because the route passes directly in front of the Malacaang Palace, the countrys seat of government.

    The ferry service is divided into two shifts: 5:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., and 2 p.m. to 11 p.m.
    Initial Charge is 25 Pesos that can run up to P45 from end to end.

    Ferry near Escolta Station Inaugural Inside the Ferry Guadalupe Station Clean Area inside station
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    Plaza de Roma

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Jun 19, 2014

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    In this lovely square, in the heart of Intramuros, you will find a statue devoted to the Spanish king Carlos IV, who, as you can read in the first picture annexed, helped the Philippines with the introduction of the smallpox vaccine, thus saving many lives of Filipinos.

    The Plaque The statue of King Carlos IV The Square
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    OBSERVE THE BARGES ON THE PASIG RIVER

    by davidjo Written Mar 21, 2014

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    Quite a few barges are tugged up and down the Pasig River, usually transporting fuel to different depots. Oil spills have occurred on the river which is already heavy polluted, so think twice about throwing your cigarette butt in the water. From the bridge behind the Immigration department i saw around 20 barges, more than i saw on previous trips.

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    Jeepney

    by Madasabull Written Feb 5, 2014

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    Take a ride on a Jeepney, they are cheap and really cheerful. These trucks where leftover American army vehicles from World War 2, and where soon put to good use by the locals.

    They are not just used as buses following a set route, the are also used as private vehicles too for family use. When they are used like this, you will likely see a sign on them stating that they are not for hire. It might say Family Use or Private on the back of somewhere else.

    I am told they have become a symbol of the culture here, and it is easy to see how that has happened. They are decorated in all kinds of ways, including chrome and metallic paints, and some really fancy trim and accessories. Like a teenager who would make his car look more than it actually was.

    London has a Black Cab and Double Decker Bus, New York the Yellow Cab, and the Philippines has the Jeepney.

    They can carry as many as 18 people, more probably, and are cheap. There are said to be around 50.000 Jeepney's in use on a daily basis in Manila, but production is said to have dropped a lot, as the heavy cost of repairs and maintenance, as well as fuel is taking it's toll, and cheaper vehicles are being used more to ferry people around. Sad really, but they are still there, like the UK's Double Decker Bus, they will be around for a very long time.

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    Manila a really modern city.

    by Madasabull Written Feb 4, 2014

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    This was not the small city I was imagining before the trip. I was expecting a fair sized city, with poverty and luxury kept far from each other. But this is not what I found.

    I found an amazingly modern city, with all the things and places you would get in any modern city, with no sign of poverty being kept separate and hidden.

    The heart of the city had huge paved area with no access for cars, lined with bars and restaurants, and statues and sculptures, water features and gardens.

    Manila is modern, and from what I am told, is developing at super speeds.

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    The poorer areas.

    by Madasabull Written Feb 4, 2014

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    Amongst the wealth of the city, are patches of houses were the people who generally service the city live. Sure, these are poorer areas, but no where near as poor as I thought I might see.

    In fact, most of these area's looked really quite nice, and people seemed to take a real pride in their homes and streets.

    I like getting in these area's, and I really enjoyed these area's here in Manila. I like to see how it really is away from the Malls, high priced restaurants and bars, and everywhere we went people were smiling and letting on to us.

    So from what I experience, don't be afraid to get away from all the tourist attraction, and get out amongst it with the locals.

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    Quiapo District

    by machomikemd Written Nov 6, 2013

    Quiapo District is the old shopping area of Manila, way before progress and the ginormous malls began sprouting around the Metropolis. Quiapo District is home of the Hawkers, street stalls, street markets, counterfeit DVD and CD sellers, Photography shops, religious and mystical shops and more, plus the Catholic and Islamic Heritage of the Philippines as the Roman Catholic Quiapo Church and the Golden Mosque are just a stone's throw away. If you want to experience Philippine folk art and culture, you must go to Quiapo.

    according to wikipedia:

    Quiapo is a district and a primary city square of Manila. It derives its name from the water cabbage (Pistia stratiotes), which is named Quiapo or Kiapo in the Tagalog language. Referred to as the "Old Downtown of Manila", Quiapo is home to the Quiapo Church, where the feast of the Black Nazarene is held with millions of people attending annually. Quiapo has also made a name for itself as a place for marketplace bargain hunting.

    Plaza Miranda, in the heart of the Quiapo district, is a town square named after Jose Sandino y Miranda, who served as secretary of the treasury of the Philippines from 1853 to 1863.[2] It is located in front of the Quiapo Church, and has become a popular site of political rallies. On August 21, 1971, while the Liberal Party held their Miting de Avance in the plaza, a bomb exploded, killing nine and injuring almost 100 civilians.

    The Quiapo district is also home to a sizable Muslim population in Manila. The Golden Mosque and Green Mosque are located there.

    A veritable army of fortune tellers and stores offering herbal products surround the Quiapo church. Ongoing sales of pirated goods and thievery are prevalent in the district.

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    DRIVING LICENSE, DEGREES, BIRTH CERTIFICATES

    by davidjo Written Oct 26, 2013

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    Recto Avenue is located in Binondo ( the nearest MRT stop is Recto Avenue or Doreteo Jose ) and the street is lined with countless stalls selling fake I D s, ranging from simple Identity Cards to University Diplomas, Police Clearances, Land Titles etc.... Fake documents are available from 80 pesos and upwards. The sellers sit on the sidewalk with bulletin boards openly showing their work. I cannot understand why the authorities don't close them down as several people have been caught working as doctors, lawyers and school teachers with these false documents.

    amazing that the authorities do nothing

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    DON't MISS THE OLDEST SIKH TEMPLE IN THE COUNTRY

    by davidjo Written Oct 22, 2013

    The Sikh Temple, Khalsa Diwan is the oldest Indian Temple in the country and visitors are made welcome by the Sikhs on duty and will gladly show you around. The temple was built in 1829 so Sikhs had a place to worship while they were away from their own country. after viewing the temple you may have the opportunity of eating a free meal in the langar (kitchen) which occupies the ground floor. When entering the temple you must remove shoes,socks, stockings and have your hair covered by a handkerchief (provided for you if you need one). There is also a faucet before you go upstairs to the main worship hall, and it is appreciated if you wash your hands and feet. Upstairs there are no icons but you will see the holy book in the main altar which is covered by a linen cloth, as you are not allowed to touch it accept for the high priest.

    the temple sign inside the entrance, donations welcome the worship room upstairs the altar with the holy book under the linen the room to leave your shoes

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    STATUE OF LAPU LAPU

    by davidjo Written Sep 8, 2012

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    Lapu lapu is a delicious red fish that can be eaten at Philippine restaurants but the more famous Lapu Lapu was the ruler of Mactan Island , next to Cebu, who was famous for being the first native to resist the Spanish colonisation. He fought in the Battle of Mactan where Magellan and several of his men were killed. It is widely accepted that Lapu Lapu himself killed the Spanish leader. You can see his statue in Rizal Park.

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    OLD TREASURY BUILDING

    by davidjo Written Sep 8, 2012

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    You will find the burnt out shell of the Treasury Building next to Immigration, but it was destroyed by fire in 1972. Surprised that nothing has been built on this lot, the real estate must be worth a fortune.

    burnt out treasury building

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    ADOLFO LOPEZ MATEOS

    by davidjo Written Sep 8, 2012

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    Near the Immigration Office you will find a small square where there is a statue of the Mexican President and a plaque commemorating 400 years since the expedition by boat from Mexico arrived in the Philippines. 1564-1964

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    Nice to look at.

    by planxty Written Jan 28, 2012

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    Readers of my other pages on VT will know that I like to research what I write carefully in order to give the best information I can, and sometimes this research leads to interesting discoveries. Such is the case with the Manila City Hall. I was looking at the attached website for information about the building and stumbled upon this quite wonderful quote,

    "Ready or not, some day it will come to an end.
    There will be no more sunrises, no minutes, hours or days.
    All the things you collected, whether treasured or forgotten,
    Will be passed to someone else.

    Your wealth, fame and temporal power will shrivel to irrelevance.
    Your grudges, resentments, frustrations and jealousies will finally disappear.
    So, too, your hopes, ambitions, plans, to-do-list will expire.
    The wins and losses that once seemed so important will fade away.
    It won't matter where you came from,
    Or on what side of the tracks you live at the end.

    It won't matter whether you were beautiful or brilliant.
    Even your gender and skin color will be irrelevant.
    So what will matter?
    How will the value of your days be measured?
    What will matter is not what you bought,
    BUT HOW YOU BUILT.
    Not what you got,
    But WHAT YOU GAVE.

    What will matter is not your success, but YOUR SIGNIFICANCE.
    What will matter is not what you learned, but what YOU TAUGHT.
    What will matter is every act of integrity, compassion, courage,
    Or sacrifice that will enrich, empower, or encourage others
    To emulate your example.

    What will matter is not your competence, but YOUR CHARACTER.
    What will matter is not how many people you knew.
    But how many will feel a LASTING LOSS WHEN YOU'RE GONE.
    What will matter is
    HOW LONG YOU WILL BE REMEMBERED,

    BY WHOM AND FOR WHAT.

    Living a life that matters doesn't happen by accident.
    It's not a matter of circumstance but of CHOICE.
    Choose to live a life that matters.

    The capitals are not mine but I think that this stands as a very good description of the Philippines in general. A relatively new country in itself, and with what appears nto be a fairly young populace, it is looking to the future whilst remembering the past, specifically that of about 60 years ago.

    To the tip itself, the City Hall is an extremely busy place and I am of the impression that you cannot access it unless you have business there. Interestingly, at the side of the building I saw a number of people with folding tables and plastic chairs offering btheir services as "notaries", basically second class lawyers. It pleased me to see the parasitic group generically called lawyers cast out in the street here they belong. My hatred of the legal profession is long, abiding and well-documented.

    The building itself, even from the3 outside, is impressive and large, to the design of Antonio Toledo. Apparently, in it's early days, it was disliked by the local people but has now come t be much loved and a landmark in central Manila. It is certaqinly worth a look.

    The other images are of a memorial to the front of the building documenting the liberation of the city from the invading Japanese in the Second World War.

    City Hall, Manila, Philippines. Memorial, City Hall, Manila, Philippines. Detail, memorial, City Hall, Manila, Philippines.
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