Sagada Nightlife

  • Nightlife
    by schurman23
  • Nightlife
    by schurman23
  • Nightlife
    by schurman23

Most Recent Nightlife in Sagada

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    Damnoan Road: Silent Night

    by schurman23 Written Nov 1, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Unfortunately when we visited Sagada, there was no nightlife in this side of the planet. Even the restaurants closes shop early and we found ourselves knocking at any available place to dine after our exhausting caving and spellunking.

    Dress Code: Flashlights or outdoor lamps

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    • Food and Dining
    • Backpacking

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    Vincent's Eatery and Snacks: Vincent's Eatery and Snacks

    by kemisteryoso Updated Feb 22, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nothing fancy about this place and can only accommodate few guests. So if you want someplace not crowded go to this place if there’s still space left for you. I tried this one because I’m too tired to go farther up from George Guesthouse. The bar only plays soft music and their Redhorse beer costs P40 pesos.

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    Kimchi: Kimchi

    by kemisteryoso Updated Feb 14, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I love this bar located in front of Igorot Inn. It is frequented by foreigners because of its international ambiance and they have good singer that belted out mixed and reggae music. I think this one is the only place where you can party while listening to live music. It is also a good place to mingle with fellow tourist and exchange experiences about the town.

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  • Lake Danum: Bonfire Dinner at Lake Danum

    by gabz Updated Oct 16, 2010
    Roasting marshmallows & hotdogs...yuuhmmm!!!
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    After having our quick afternoon nap to recharge ourselves, our group then headed to Lake Danum for our Bonfire Dinner. We've just waited in our Guest House's mini-living room for Sir Raymond and his SAGGAS acquaintances, who were then buying some bonfire foods and their very special viand called "Pinikpikang Manok" that they've suggested for our dinner. Lake Danum ia a small lake which can be found at the borders of Sagada and its neighboring municipality, Besao. Lake Danum, which literally means “lake water,” is four (4) kilometers away from the municipal hall of Sagada, so we decided to hire a jeepney (but Sir Ray was able to get us a comfortable van!) that would bring us to the bonfire ground. We were supposed to catch the sunset at the lake, for it's also been known as a perfect spot for sunset viewing, but unfortunately, the weather turned bad as the rain started to fall at around 1300-0330, so we didn't get the chance to capture the sunset. But our adventure wouldn't be completed without our Bonfire Dinner experience, so we've decided to push it through despite of the sudden weather changed, and just prayed that everything would work out just fine once we started our bonfire dinner (otherwise, we're goin to have our petromax dinner inside our van, nyahaha).

    FELLOWSHIP UNDER THE STARS: A GREAT BONFIRE DINNER

    It was already past five when the sky started to clear, so we then proceeded to our last rendezvous together with of course our wholehearted guides (Sir Raymond, Sir Erwin & David).
    We were chasing the sunset along the valley as our van tackled the uneven clay road up to the lake. The sky was heavily overcast and the sun was unfortunately unable to break
    through the thick flat clouds that covered the heavens.

    We arrived at the Lake around six in the evening. It took us one hour to reach the place because of our stop-overs at Youghurt House and Souvenir Shop. It looks like the the lake has been reserved for our group that evening, because nobody among the tourist in Sagada had bravely tried to have a bonfire or just a visit at the lake that evening. Perhaps, they weren't a risk-taker like us who would challenge the unpredictable weather. The moment we stepped out of the van, we got an answered prayer, because the heavily overcast sky that afternoon had turned into a beautiful night. The sky that evening was covered with a blanket of thousands of stars, that seemed like falling on the other side of the Lake (gee, the other stars were amazingly surprising because they're at the ground level that i thought was just a light from a forest house!). A visit to the lake may not be as beautiful if the purpose is to see the sunset, however, there is still a magic in this tranquil lake during the cold night, and it could still be the best picnic ground for dinner and some drinks over a bonfire. I could say that this is the perfect spot to enjoy the nightlife in Sagada where you could have bonfire dinner/gatherings, overnight camping/jamming/parties or even just a simple stargazing (you could asked your guide to have it arranged for you). It is a silty lake carpeted of thick grass (a carabao grass, if i'm not mistaken) surrounded by layered of trees in a misty forest going up to Mt. Ampacao. And though it rained, the ground was surprisingly clean, without any traces of muds or patches of rainwater.


    After a while, the temperature had started to drop down, so Sir Raymond decided to set up the bonfire fueled with pine woods while David and Sir Erwin had already started cooking our "Pinikpikang Manok" in a large biscuit can (yeah a biscuit can!). Pinikpikan is a ceremonial dish from the Cordilleras. It is prepared by beating a live chicken using a stick before cooking, the bruises from the beatings, supposedly enhanced its flavor. Animal rights people may cry foul over this practice but this custom has been around since time immemorial in this part of the Philippines. It is said that after the chicken dies, it is then sliced open to unveil a prediction in its gall bladder: if it's hidden the guest were safe, otherwise, the guest will be in trouble or needs to be more cautious. We're lucky to have a chicken with a hidden gall bladder, so we're all safe! The chicken is then turned over a few times on the bonfire to cook its skin and completely remove its feathers. And afterwards, left to stew on a veggie broth until fully cooked.
    The cooking process for "Pinikpikang Manok" took quite some time. So while waiting for our dinner, we've all circled the inviting bonfire and started to warm-up ourselves with some shots of "The Bar" (gee, we forgot to try their Rice Wine!). Sir Erwin initiated to roast our hotdogs artistically strucked in long sharpened edge sticks and marshmallows in a sharpened edge magic wand look-a-like sticks with so many little branches, so we could roast up to five marshmallows in just one magic wand (weee, that was fantastic!), over the bonfire. I've never been interested in marshmallows when I was a youngster, until I've learned how to roast a marshmallow over the bonfire that night (oh i just love the crispy melting marshmallow inside my mouth,yuhhmm!). That evening, in the light of a bonfire, our fellowship with our guides made us feel how they were proud of their heritage and how well they preserved their undisturbed cultures and traditions.


    After a couple of hours of deep conversation with our guides (our newly-found friends) and some food tripping over the bonfire, with Sir Raymond sneaking some stolen shots of us (we really looked funny on our stolen shots,harharr!), our "Pinikpikang Manok" and pork liempo was finally served on a long & whole banana leaves (freshly cut along the lake) with steaming white rice evenly sliced into eight, like a pie..a rice pie! That was really a unique bonfire banquet that cap off that day’s events! The chicken meat was a bit chewy and I was a bit uncomfortable eating without a table, but it really has a unique palatable taste of a native chicken (yuuhmm!) and the warm soup was delightly audible (mmmm, i forgot my dizziness from the vodka shots)! As the evening strucked ten, everyone had their fill of the Pinikpikan and a
    few more light conversation were passed around. The bonfire was about to go out, and the air was getting colder and colder. The night was about to engulf us; it was finally time to go back.

    Even though I was unable to fully explore Lake Danum, it was still a fun experience; the late afternoon ride to the lake, the cool mountain air, the warmth of the bonfire, the roasted marshmallows and hotdogs over the bonfire, the laughs and stories passed in betweens and the Pinikpikan dinner finale. This is, as Sir Raymond puts it, Sagada’s version of a night out.

    That was my first time to have a bonfire, and I could have no regrets if that will be the last, because I couldn't asked for more than what I've gratefully experience and that really gives me a whole satisfaction! Whooohooo!!!

    Dress Code: Windbreaker Jacket/sweater/thick long sleeves or fleece, dark colored trekking pants/jogging pants/cargo pants, shawl, bonnet/cap/hat, trekking shoes/rubber shoes

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  • baddict's Profile Photo

    Our guest room: Drink and be merry !!!

    by baddict Written Mar 12, 2008
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    There's a strict curfew of 9pm in Sagada so my friends and I opted to just drink gin and orange mix in our guest room. Bring your portable speakers and ipod ut be conscious to keep the volume low in consideration of the curfew. Our guest room had a balcony so we drank al fresco...we saved on food and pulutan because we packed a lot of canned goods, instant noodles, bread and coffee :)

    The booze, the bottle of gin, the fresh chilly weather, good conversation and close friends made the nightlife a very happy one.... best of all, if you drink a little too much, all you have to do is hop into bed :)

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  • ging&rose's Profile Photo

    Alibama: Bohemian nite in Alibama

    by ging&rose Written Nov 15, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    becuase of the 9pm curfew it's best to eat dinner by 6pm so tht by 7pm you can go straight
    to alibama. it's on the left side further down the road passing traveller's inn. you will not miss the sign but u'll be wary since you will not hear nor see anything once you go down the stairs.

    it's at the back of the small building. enter the door on your left and alas! you enter
    a place so colorful with free videoke!

    we stayed till 10pm because after our nth song, the manager whispered to us that after 2 songs we have to stop the singing but can still stay for drinks.

    Dress Code: come as you are =)

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  • rain_forest's Profile Photo

    Starry nights

    by rain_forest Written Jun 12, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is no nightlife in Sagada - that is if you're looking for a band/clubs that can play all night. Do as the locals do - they go out of their houses, chat a little and go to bed promptly at nine. Don't, for the love of God, watch TV. That's why you're there in the first place, to take in the serenity and peacefulness of the place. The world will not change a lot if you won't see the little box for a while. But it can do wonders for your peace of mind.

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    Moment of Silence

    by Erebos Written Dec 16, 2006

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    Nights spent in Sagada are nights of reflection, meditation, and prayer. At 9pm, no one's expected to be outside their houses/ hotels. People are probably sleeping already. This will give you time to think about things of importance to you. Or just chill and relax. You won't have trouble sleeping in Sagada. It's ambience guarantees to lull you to sleep.

    Dress Code: comfortable clothes

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  • gareth13's Profile Photo

    Somewhere out there: Night Walking.. waheheheh

    by gareth13 Updated Dec 14, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nowadays!!! night life in SAGADA is emerging....

    Alcohol bars are emerging,, and,, they are located outside the town......

    if u want to drink beer or wine etc.. at night time.. ask someone to pin point where u could go.

    These are establishments that open at night...

    Alen's Billiards- location: Ambasing
    Pines Town -- Kapinitan...
    and more...

    if u want the best nightlife in SAGADA... Arrange a Bonfire.. Tell the Guides....

    Dress Code: naaaaaa.......... u can wear any....

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    Terrace: Endless Chills and Banters

    by greensalad Updated Nov 15, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's Good to be in Bed at Night
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    There's no way you can have a night life in Sagada the way you imagine a nightlife in Manila. Apart from the 9:00pm curfew they impose, the restos are already closed after 10:00pm. So what better way to enjoy your night? By doing what you imagined to do in one Sagada night. RELAX.

    Relaxation can mean sleeping early, soul-searching or going senti alone, or just chilling out with friends. We had a nice time enjoying the night sky so we stayed at terrace of George Guest House and just stared at the stars. I haven't seen those numerous stars in Manila. (Obviously, it was way polluted in the urban jungle for stars to peek through smoke.)

    After getting our nerves cold, we went inside our rooms to talk, talk, and talk. We chatted about different things and recalled what happened during the day. The girls had a fun time seeing the pics and laughing at them while retelling the stories behind each photograph.

    Hay, it's good to be off to dreamland in Sagada.

    Dress Code: Night dresses or pajamas or shirts or shorts. The choices are endless. Haha! Make sure you're tucked in bed with flanella blankets or those thicker ones. Bring sweaters, or shawls, or cardigans to keep off the cold.

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  • myspices's Profile Photo

    Early to Bed....early to rise.. (No night life)

    by myspices Written Oct 21, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ... early to bed.

    In Sagada, there is no night life. By about 6pm, the sky is already getting dark. Most of the people have their dinner early. Curfew time is 9pm. According to the locals, it does not mean that you are not allowed out of your house/lodge after 9pm, it just that you are not supposed to be rowdy and make a lot of noise in the town. Most of the locals would have retired to bed by 9pm. Some visitors usually hang out in restaurants and cafes for a cuppa... while others would prefer to snuggle in bed because of the cold nights.

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  • nimato's Profile Photo

    No Life At Night

    by nimato Written Oct 7, 2006

    There is really no nightlife to talk about in Sagada. In all my three visits here, the 9pm curfew was consistently implemented. Not that Sagada is an unsafe place for locals and strangers alike but they say that it's just a preventive measure. I really don't know the answer, if you'd ask me.

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  • monina_c's Profile Photo

    Drinking Beyond Curfew

    by monina_c Updated Sep 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    All bars and restaurants in Sagada close up at 9:00 pm. But you can circumbent this rule by buying your drinks from the stores that line the roads in Sagada and taking them into you hostel/inn. Most owners let guests drink beyond the curfew as long as they don't get rowdy and loud. Just to be safe, ask permission first before opening your brew.

    Dress Code: :D

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  • badbaronan's Profile Photo

    your bed!: Dream Catcher

    by badbaronan Written Apr 22, 2006

    Sagada has a 9Pm curfew, and St. Joseph's Resthouse has a 10PM curfew. Nightime is for you to relax to recharge your energy for the next day's activity. If you cant fall asleep, stay in the lobby you'll find yourself having conversation with other tourist waiting to become sleepy just like yourself. or recharge those batteries =)

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    Cafe St. Joe: Cafe St. Joe

    by carisse Written Mar 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Generally, there is no nightlife in Sagada. this is because the local police impose a 9pm curfew. all establishments are usually closed by this time. however, during our trip there we were able to have drinks at cafe st joe after having dinner at another restaurant. sometimes local bands perform here, playing a wide range of music (pop, country, ballads, reggae).

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