Banaue Local Customs

  • The Moma or Nga-Nga (Sorry... a bit queasy)
    The Moma or Nga-Nga (Sorry... a bit...
    by Pinoy_Traveller
  • Ifugao Mom and Son
    Ifugao Mom and Son
    by Pinoy_Traveller
  • smiling back is not such a hard thing to do is it?
    smiling back is not such a hard thing to...
    by reeya

Most Recent Local Customs in Banaue

  • Pinoy_Traveller's Profile Photo

    Odd Ifugao's Oral Health Practices : Nga-Nga

    by Pinoy_Traveller Updated Mar 10, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Moma or Nga-Nga (Sorry... a bit queasy)

    Ifugaos have long regarded this conspicuously odd health practice, chewing Nga-nga as a way of life.

    This entails chewing of Moma - a melange of scraped portion of oblong nuts called betel nut (pronounced: bee-tel) with lime paste, sometimes with a piece of cured tobacco and wrapped in heart-shaped leaf.

    This is then perpetually chewed (oh yeah) at least once a day to fortify tooth strength and keep the oral cavity from bacteria. The odd thing about this practice is that the person is refrained from swallowing nga-nga and therefore spews out this visually unpleasant brick-red colored material almost anywhere possible (Define anywhere possible?: It’s anywhere without people).

    Lucky you if they notice that you are there down below....

    Consequently, Ifugaos are on the way to painting their town red... :-)

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinoy_Traveller's Profile Photo

    Ifugaos: American Style Hospitality

    by Pinoy_Traveller Updated Mar 10, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ifugao Mom and Son

    Where in the Philippines can you find a tribe that speaks English? Answer… only in Banaue. Yes, although Ilocano (a Philippine dialect) is widely spoken, it was hilariously unbelievable to find yourself talking to a deceivingly clad native who speaks English in the remotest part of the Cordillera highlands. Not only that, if you say ‘thank you’, be prepared to hear a common response that goes ‘you’re welcome’. Remember, this is one of the remotest part of the mountainous region…

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • reeya's Profile Photo

    Rituals

    by reeya Written Oct 30, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    locally called Bulul or the rice god
    1 more image

    The Ifugaos have a lot of rituals and cultural practices. The rituals would mostly involve invoking of spirits of their ancestors or nature gods. Some of these rituals are done privately but if you are invited to witness one, by all means go and observe. Ask permission before snapping your camera. On more common Christian occasions like weddings, baptism, etc.. anyone is invited. No one will care if you don't know anyone related to the hosts. Just be prepared to be part of everyone's photo albums though.

    Was this review helpful?

  • utchie's Profile Photo

    Say HELLO with a smile!

    by utchie Written Dec 29, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Locals here in Banaue are very friendly and accomodating.. You'll find them smiling most of the time, youngsters almost always greets hello or hi as you pass by..

    (We were in a jeep on our way to Batad and our 4 foreign co-passengers are simply amazed and really enjoys waving back to everybody).

    So if you notice them looking at you, just smile and greet!

    Was this review helpful?

  • myspices's Profile Photo

    Skulls and Bones ... decorative pieces

    by myspices Written Nov 3, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Decorative pieces at entrance of Ifugao house

    The skulls and bones of hunted monkeys, buffaloes, deer are hung at the entrance of the Ifugao house. Asked if these are hung to ward away evil spirits, the Ifugao lady said that they are actually hung as decorative items ....

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • myspices's Profile Photo

    Drying Stalks of Grains

    by myspices Updated Nov 3, 2006
    Stalks of rice are bundled up to dry everywhere

    Almost each family along the rice fields will dry their stalks of rice this way - tie them in small bundles and spread them either on any concrete slabs or on a mat placed along the road. It 's rather fun to see pigeons having a great fill from the drying grains.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • myspices's Profile Photo

    What's that red stuff ......

    by myspices Written Nov 3, 2006
    Stained concrete steps

    If you happened to see lots of patches of red stains on the concrete, do not think that it's blood stain. It is actually the spit of those locals who love to chew the betel leaves with some kind of white paste. Old and young love to chew on them and this will cause their teeth to be brick red in colour. When chewing these betel leaves, they salivate a lot and thus spit out on the floor. According to them, it is addictive because chewing these leaves with the paste brings out certain sensation and it was said that it refreshes the teeth...

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dyesebel's Profile Photo

    Dance Show

    by Dyesebel Updated Apr 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    If you are going to Banaue and staying in Banaue Hotel, makes sure it's weekend, because there's a cultural show.You will learn about different types of dances, tribes and tradition of the Ifugaos.And it's really very interesting and entertaining.
    As u see in the picture, women's traditional skirts are not the same.It is because those class lines are marked with appropriate symbols of social deference.
    From L-R: A skirt with white band in the middle(Kadangyan)=owns tracts of land and other material possessions
    A skirt with just black and white stripes(Nawatwat)=poor families,no land or property
    A skirt with colorful stripes(Natumok)=less affluent or middle class
    In spite of class divisions,kinship remains to be one of the powerful integrating forces in society

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • bike_packer's Profile Photo

    Ifugao Cultural Show

    by bike_packer Written Dec 1, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cultural Show
    1 more image

    During weekends, the Banaue Hotel showcases the Ifugao customs and traditions by holding a Cultural Show at the hotel's lobby. Very educational, as well as entertaining. Local customs, traditions, rites, dances, songs/musical instruments.

    Guests should never miss the join-in dancing with the dance group at the finale. Great photo-op with traditionally-dressed Ifugaos.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Banaue

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

69 travelers online now

Comments

Banaue Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Banaue local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Banaue sightseeing.

View all Banaue hotels