Santiago Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by joiwatani
  • Local Customs
    by joiwatani
  • Local Customs
    by joiwatani

Most Recent Local Customs in Santiago

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    Lobsters for $1.00 a piece

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 16, 2010

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    Small lobsters
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    There are some women who carries around a basket on their heads and sell their catch of the day. Sometimes they sell lobsters, shrimps, fish, stingray, etc.

    The lobsters here are for sale for $1.00 a piece.

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    Eat the famous"Filipino pancit"

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 11, 2010
    A big pot of pancit
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    There are three famous Filipino food: pancit, lumpia and adobo. Other than these, a lot of foreigners don't like to eat any of our food because it's not very delightful to see compared to our sisters in Southeast Asian cuisine.

    Pancit is made of rice noodles sauteed in pork or chicken. It is sauteed in garlic, shallots, onions, green and red bell pepper, cabbage, carrots, celery, ***ake mushrooms, shrimps and sprinkled in fish sauce and soy sauce. It is served with "calamansi" (lemon) and garnished with chopped green onions.

    It is best eaten when it's hot with a fork or chopsticks!

    Pancit is usually prepared during birthdays. It is believed that it gives the celebrant long life because of the long noodles!

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    Eating "Sinuman"

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 10, 2010
    Sinuman (Sticky rice wrapped in banana leaves)

    In my Santiago webpage tips, I have to introduce you with our local customs and as you noticed, I have been introducing you with my local Ilocano food! When I go home to Santiago, I ask people to cook for me since most of the stuff that I love to eat, I can't cook. (I love to cook but the local ingredients especially the local vegetables and ingredients I can't find them where I live).

    "Sinuman" is actually a delicacy in the Ilocos region. It is a sticky rice steamed in banana leaves. Before they wrap the sticky rice, they have to boil the rice first until it is half-cooked. They boil it with freshly-grated coconut milk and added with brown sugar and a little bit of salt.

    The half-cooked rice is wrapped in banana leaves and steamed for about an hour. "Sinuman" is served warm or cold and it is great with coffee or coke!

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    Eating "Bibingka" (Rice cake)

    by joiwatani Written Oct 10, 2010

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    Bibingka (rice cake)

    The best part of going to Santiago is eating the rice cake called "Bibingka". It is made of sticky rice, coconut milk and raw sugarcane bars.

    There is a lady in barangay (smallest Filipino political unit) Nalasin who has a specialty in cooking bibingka. People order them a day in advance and delivers them to the house.

    The rice cake is usually sweet and sticky. It is paired with coffee, tea or softdrinks. Bibingka is a delicacy of the Ilocanos and this is served during birthdays and other parties.

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    Eating "lechon"

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 10, 2010
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    Have you been to a Filipino wedding? Most of the time, there's the lechon on the table. Lechon is a slowly-roasted pig ( a whole pig ). The cavity of the pig is stuffed with spices and the skin is roasted to a brown color and it gets really crunchy.

    The whole roasted pig is served on a table and an apple is usually placed on the mouth of the pig.

    Filipinos love this and they usually eat it with boiled plain rice.

    Sometimes, it is served chopped into small pieces so it is easier to eat.

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    Eating "Karrot"

    by joiwatani Written Oct 10, 2010

    When with the locals, eat like the locals! That's the only way you get to know the culture. The Ilocanos of the Philippines eat different kinds of foods and I was once told that the Ilocanos will never starve because they eat everything!

    There's this tuber that the rice farmers eat. It's called "karrot". The farmers eat this tuber during the rainy days when this tuber is abundant.

    The farmers form a group and go to the mountains and gather them. They usually bring them in backpacks made of bamboos covered in banana leaves. They then cleanse them with water and cook them with oil or just plain steam them. When the tuber is still raw, the color is white. Once cooked, the color turn into yellow. They eat this with salt or sugar.

    This staple is a substitute for rice.

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    Eating "Kilawen" ("pupu")

    by joiwatani Written Oct 10, 2010

    The Ilocanos are fond of eating "Kilawen", an Ilocano dish made out of roasted goat skin. The men usually eat this food when they drink beer or gin. It's a famous Ilocano food.

    During weddings, birthdays, or any occasion, a goat is roasted and the roasted skin is separated from it's meat. The skin is cut into bite-sizes and mixed with vinegar, salt, pepper, shallots, ginger, onions, and squeed 'calamansi" or lemon. It is served with beer, gin or whiskey!

    It is called "pulutan" in the local dialect.

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    Eating "Ginataan"

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 10, 2010

    During the rainy season, the farmers go up in the mountains and gather tubers called "Kamangeg". It's a tuber that is elongated and covered with small roots. This is also found in the mountains of Japan and it's also eaten by the Japanese.

    When cleaning this tuber, they have to remove the outer layer and boil them - kind of like boiling sweet potatoes. They sometimes cut this into smaller pieces and mixed with coconut, peanuts, rice balls and mixed with a little bit of sugar. The local delicacy is called "ginataan" meaning mixed in coconut milk.

    This served as a "merienda" or snack.

    This delicacy is usually served during the rainy days to farmers after they come home from planting rice. Nowadays, the farmers in Santiago serve them during holidays and birthdays!

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    Eating sea snails

    by joiwatani Written Oct 10, 2010
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    The best part of visiting the Philippines is eating different classes of colorful fishes and eating different kinds of snails from the ocean!

    If you are not as adventurous on your taste buds, eating these different snails maybe not your cup of tea but for me, I will eat everything as long as I see them boiled! (ha! ha! ha!)

    When my brother came home with seashells, I thought I will be bringing them as gifts for my children only to frind out that it is our lunch!

    My brother boiled them and cracked the shells and it was delicious....Yummy!

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Santiago Local Customs

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