Palawan Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by davidjo
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by davidjo
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by davidjo

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Palawan

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    BE AWARE OF THE UNDERTOW

    by davidjo Written Mar 10, 2014

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    LOOKS BEAUTIFUL BUT BE CAREFUL

    Be very careful if you are swimming on the west coast of the island as there are some dangerous undertows that will drag you out to sea very quickly. If you feel that the current is strong head for shallower water straight away before it is too late. If the current does drag you out to sea don't try to swim against it as this will tire you out and you won't be able to fight it anyway. Try to swim to the left or right of the current and you should be able to escape from it and swim ashore safely. Sabang Beach will have red flags flying if the conditions are unsafe. Nagtabon is extremely dangerous as well as City Beach a little south of there. Generally there will be no problem on the east coast of the island.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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    DON'T TAKE MANGOES ON THE PLANE

    by davidjo Written Feb 23, 2014

    Some mangoes on Palawan are infested with the mango pulp weevil and the mangoes are not allowed off of the island Also palm seedlings can be infested with a bug and those too are not allowed off of the island. If you are caught doing so you may expect a heavy fine as the rules are strictly enforced.
    Mango trees are not all infested with the weevil but only certain areas, and the local officials will come round to any farmer who has mango trees and spray them Also mangoes from certain areas are taken to be x-rayed and infested ones are destroyed. I think it costs 1 peso to x-ray 4 mangoes and after doing so they are stamped so people know that they are safe to buy. Likewise the local authorities will come round and drill a hole in the coconut trees and inject a liquid which will kill the bug infesting the coconut trees.

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    ROAD CONDITIONS

    by davidjo Written Feb 18, 2014
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    If hiring a motorbike or using public transport be aware of the road conditions. Basically there is one road from Rio Tuba in the south of the island and another road from El Nido in the north of the island, both starting from Puerto Princesa and around 530 kms in total length. The road mainly runs up the east coast until you reach Taytay in the north and other roads branch off to the west coast. There will be a road constructed in the coming years from km 23 on the southern highway that will take you through Napsan and down the west coast via Quezon, Rizal, Sikud and ending up near Rio Tuba as the authorities want to open up this beautiful area to tourists. Already there are one or two stretches here and there that have already been concreted. So here are some detailed information regarding road conditions.

    SOUTH HIGHWAY
    Puerto Princesa to Aborlan----good road, recently completed 68 kms
    Aborlan to Narra----good road, recently completed 30 kms
    Narra to Brookes Point---- most of it is in good condition but there are places where the road is unsurfaced and road building is taking place. Be careful of pot holes 67 kms
    Brookes Point to Rio Tuba----excellent road, completed in 2011 60 kms

    KM 23 junction to Napsan----the road is under construction and 50% concreted , but the rest is slow going because of pot holes and loose stones. 30 kms
    Approx 10 kms north of Rio Tuba there is a junction to Rizal. Unsurfaced except for a couple of stretches, many hills, many potholes, loose stones and muddy during rainy season---slow 67 kms
    Rizal to Quezon---Slow going, unsurfaced, slow going, many hills---60 kms
    Quezon to Napsan----unsurfaced except for a few stretches, extremely bad in places, particularly between Berong and Aparuwan where there are large stones on the road and very hilly. --100 kms

    NORTH HIGHWAY
    Puerto Princesa to Roxas---very good condition, ----approx 140kms
    Roxas to Taytay--- good condirion----approx 60 kms
    Taytay to El Nido---mostly good condition but still 30% to be surfaced----approx 60 kms
    Junction to Port Barton (Km 115?)---extremely difficult in the rainy season, unsurfaced 25 kms
    Salvacion to Sabang (km 39?)---surfaced and fairly good conditions but have to be careful in a couple of stretches---45 kms
    KM 23 Junction to Nagtabon----road being constructed 50% completed, rest unsurfaced but good except the last hill leading to Nagtabon----12 kms

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    THEY ITCH LIKE HELL!!!!!!

    by davidjo Written Jul 7, 2013

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    DO NOT SCRATCH!!!!!!

    SANDFLIES, known locally as NIK-NIKS are common on many of the beaches of Palawan, especially Sabang, Port Barton and El Nido. Sandflies are very tiny (1-2mm) but don't sting you--- they bite, but you will not notice the bite until it is too late. Ten minutes later you will start scratching but this should be avoided as you may end up with a big wound on your leg.
    Unfortunately there is not much you can do once you are bitten, just resist the temptation to scratch, (the itchy sensation may last for 2 or 3 days).
    To avoid being bitten the natives rub themselves with coconut oil, and if you should be lucky enough to purchase some, try mixing the oil with 'OFF' or similar.

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    STONEFISH--IMPOSSIBLE TO SEE BUT EASY TO STEP ON

    by davidjo Written Jul 7, 2013

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    ugly creature

    The stonefish (which belongs to the scorpion group of fish, such as the lionfish) lurks around Palawan's beaches in as little as a meter of water and you will know when you stand on one. It is one of the most poisonous fish in the ocean and can kill you if you have a weak heart. It has a big head, a warty body, sometimes covered in algae and to complicate matters it changes color according to the seabed. Most of its body will be buried in sand as it waits for its prey to arrive, so it will be almost impossible to see it. It has 72 spines, each with venom in the end, and the spines can penetrate light sneakers and should you stand on one you will certainly know about it. When it stings you the affected area will turn blue and red, accompanied by excrutiating pain and swelling, and unfortunately there is nothing you can do to relieve the pain. You may experience shivering, high fever, vomiting and paralysis of your hands and feet, so seek medical treatment immediately.
    You can move the broken spine and pour hot water on the area as the venom is killed in this way. Deaths normally occur within 8 hours but if you survive, which is most likely the paralysis and pains can continue for several weeks. And morphine does not help!!!

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    JELLYFISH CAN RUIN YOUR DAY

    by davidjo Written Jul 6, 2013

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    DANGER LURKS
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    At certain times of the year the sea around Palawan will have many jellyfish (January-March) which can give you a sting, rather like a prick from a pin. However the quantities of jellyfish are diminishing due to fishing, and there are quite a few jellyfish buying stations around the island that reportedly collect 20-30,000 umbrellas a day (heads without the tentacles). The dried jellyfish are repacked in Manila where they are exported to Japan and Korea.
    The box jellyfish is an entirely different matter as they can be extremely painful and quite dangerous. They are almost transparent and have long tentacles and are found around the island. Should you be stung by one it is extremely painful and you must pour vinegar on the stings to neutralise the affect. I would assume that we are not about to carry a bottle of vinegar with us, so you can also urinate on the affected area or sometimes petrol.
    I was actually stung by a box jellyfish 20 years ago, up in Coron and the small raised marks where it stung me did not disappear for over a month.

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    beware of snakes

    by davidjo Written Jun 13, 2012

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    There are many snakes on Palawan and i usually see at least 6 a year on my land. I am afraid i try to kill them all as many are poisonous and there does not seem to be too much information about them . I have seen cobras and a small snake that has black and white hoops, 2 feet long and the last 3 cms of its tail is bright red. This is what is locally known as an okku-okku or VIPER to us. If you are bitten by one you only have up to 5 hours to live. The big problem is that there is no antivenom on the island as far as i know.

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    Monkeys or Water Snakes

    by yellowbell Written Aug 19, 2004

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    Limestone Karst near St. Paul Subterranean River

    Being a UNESCO world heritage listed site, you can't swim in the waters near the St. Paul Subterranean River, Palawan.

    Just admire those limestone karst landscape, walk amongst the lizards and the monkeys. Sorry, are we blocking the view?

    Watch out for monkeys that roam around the trail going to the St. Paul Subterranean River. Don't feed them as they are encouraged to grab those plastic bags thinking you have food in there. Be careful! One tourist got her hand bitten by a monkey.

    "Don't stick your hand out in the water." cautions your boatman as you go inside the bat-lined cave. Just admire the stalactites/ stalagmites that form the apostles, the holy family and fruits. Stalac what? Check out those science books.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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Palawan Warnings and Dangers

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