Padre Burgos Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by missmarianne
  • able to see one in here
    able to see one in here
    by barbie_sunrise
  • Rock climbing at Borawan island
    Rock climbing at Borawan island
    by Milliecious

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Padre Burgos

  • Walking to reach rock formations

    by Milliecious Written Nov 27, 2011
    Rock climbing at Borawan island

    Be careful in geting off the boat and walking to reach rock formations. At Mag-asawang bato rock formations, most flat rocks are either covered with mosses or embedded with sharp shells.
    Rock climbers are very adventurous. I talked to a tourism council member and heard that rock climbing in Borawan island is not yet approved as safe by the council.

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    the first CUt is the dEEpest..

    by missmarianne Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    of this sea Urchin.

    ADMU Biology Major, Jaypee Tan described it as...

    one of the most hated and feared sea urchins in Philippine waters. Usually black with extremely long spines, pink and creamy white morphs have been seen. The spines are very brittle, hollow, and needle-sharp. Do not touch.

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    down by the sea.. nanana I think I saw..dadada

    by missmarianne Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    (singing Collective Soul's song)

    a sea snake whahahah!!!
    am sure I've seen one.
    on our way Up to the house, this sea snake welcomed us by crossing the rocky path I was about to step on. whew! d big brothers didn't make fuszz about it, but I know.. am truLy aware of ................its danger!

    Jaypee Yan of ADMU, researched on this, and....

    here... ..

    Laticauda colubrina, a common sea snake in the Indo-Pacific area.Docile and non-aggressive, this venemous animal should not be aggravated. Can be seen in mangroves, seagrass beds, and coral reefs.

    If bitten, get to a hospital with the snake that bit you, so antivenom can be manufactured. Rhabdomyolysis will occur, making muscles spoogy and uncontrollable. This may lead to death.

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    don't get boxed by this thing!

    by missmarianne Written Nov 6, 2008

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    1 more image

    it's a box jellyfish that we chanced upon the clear water sorrounding the islaNd that we stayed at. Thank God for the miracle....... oh btW, here are some tips when you come accross this mindless yet deadly creature:

    The Box Jellyfish is mostly a problem from October - May.
    Symptoms:
    - severe pain
    - headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea
    - skin swelling/wounds/redness
    - difficulty breathing, swallowing and speech
    - shivering, sweating
    - irregular pulse/heart failure
    Stings treatment:
    - pour vinegar over tentacles. Urine does not work on the Box Jelly or Irukandji.
    - lift off any tentacles with a stick or similar.
    - use pressure-immobilisation on limbs if possible. i.e. quickly wrap a light bandage above and below the sting [if you can't get two fingers under the bandage, it's too tight].
    - Immobilize/splint the stung area and keep it at heart level [gravity-neutral] if possible. Too high causes venom to travel to the heart, too low causes more swelling.
    - Do not drink alcohol, or take any medicine or food.
    - get medical treatment urgently or apply antivenom if available.

    Irukandji [Carukia barnesi and several other unidentified species that produce irukandji syndrome] - also lurks in the waters of Northen Australia, mostly near Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef. Irregular sea currents can easily move it to the shore.
    It is extremely painful and occasionally deadly.
    Irukandji has been seen as far south as Brisbane.
    It's mostly a problem from November - May, but has been recorded in all months except July and August.
    Symptoms [as little as 5 minutes after apparently mild stings]:
    - lower back pain, intense headache.
    - muscle cramps and shooting pains, nausea, vomiting.
    - catastrophically high blood pressure.
    - restlessness and feeling of impending doom.
    - death from heart failure or fluid on the lungs.
    Stings treatment:
    - pour vinegar over tentacles.
    - lift off any tentacles with a stick or similar.
    - compress the wound area with a bandage.
    - take pain killers.
    - get medical treatment as soon as possible.

    additionally...,

    Travel Safety Jellfish Information:

    There are around two thousand species of Jellyfish in the world but less than one hundred are considered dangerous to human animals. They are not in fact fish but invertebrates with none of the organs we would associate with higher life forms.

    Jellyfish eat mainly zooplankton and do so by capturing them with toxic tentacles which range from a few inches to a few hundred feet long. They travel around the oceans on self propulsion, tide and wind, in warm and cold waters alike.

    The complete lack of a brain means that if a jellyfish stings you it really can't help it - unless it's Chironex fleckeri which can control itself efficiently, even without a brain.
    If its stinging cells [nematocysts] make contact with your skin they will release their poison into it.

    The Box jelly species, known as Cubozoa [ie. cube shape], includes Irukandji as far as scientists are concerned, though laymen think of the Box jelly as the big one and Irukandji as the little 'un. The biological names are: Chironex fleckeri [the Box] and Carukia barnesi [the Peanut]

    Dangerous Jellyfish:

    Box Jelly [Chironex fleckeri - pictured above left and resulting scars right - and 20 near relatives] is found off the shores of Northern Australia, PNG, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. This marine animal has a boxy bell head the size of a basket ball and three metre tentacles that can kill a man in a couple of minutes, though there are recent reports of much smaller Box jellies that are just as deadly.
    It has 3 million stinging cells every centimtre of its tentacles!
    The Box jelly is responsible for at least one death a year around Australia and has killed 67 people since records began in 1883, though the total is misleading since many deaths attributed to heart attacks or drowning could have been caused by toxic jellies.
    Problem shores are usually signposted, and this is one serious bubblepack to be avoided at all costs - the most poisonous creature in the world.
    New Scientist magazine [Nov '03] revealed that Box jellies are not 'dim-witted ocean drifters' but 'fast, active predators that hunt and kill with incredible speed and brutality.'

    am no jellyfish genius.......ahki....just spreading the info for ya folks..!

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    Box Jelly Fish

    by barbie_sunrise Written Nov 4, 2008

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    clearer pic of the jelly
    1 more image

    It is the third in the top list of most poisonous creatures. It lives in Pacific Ocean. It has 3 m tentacles around it. If you somehow touch it, this means that you live the last 5 minutes of your life.

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