Pundaquit Things to Do

  • Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales Philippines
    Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales...
    by elhombre30
  • Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales Philippines
    Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales...
    by elhombre30
  • Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales Philippines
    Nagsasa Cove, Province of Zambales...
    by elhombre30

Most Recent Things to Do in Pundaquit

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    Explore Pundaquit River

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    bungalow by the river
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    The road in Pundaquit ends when you reach the river, but you can usually wade across it if it is not the rainy season. From the other side it is only 3 or 400 m to the end of the beach where sometimes you will find a small stream emerging. Follow this stream 200 m inland and you will come to Pundaquit Falls where it is possible to splash around in the small pool. Views from the beach up the river are very picturesque as you can see the green hills on the south side of the river. Sometimes the river is cut off from the sea due to a lack of water and the villagers must dig through the sand so the bangkas have access to the river.

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    CAMARA ISLAND

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    seems like two islands, but it is only one!!!

    Trips can be taken to Camara Island for around 700-800 pesos. From the shore it looks as if there are two islands but it is possible to walk between them at low tide as they are actually only one island that is connected by a white sandbar, not visible from the shore at Pundaquit. At high tide the sandbar disappears as it is covered by water. There are also interesting rock formations on the island which are good for sheltering you from the sun.

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    • Beaches
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    EXPLORING CAPONES ISLAND

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    overhanging cliffs
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    We settled on the beach at the rear side of the island, but also explored another two, all three beaches were sandy but when you entered the water the sand was soon replaced by slabs of rock. It would probably be better if you visited the island at high tide. The rock formations are quite interesting with some overhangs. It would have been nice to climb to the highest point on the island which would have offered a great view but unfortunately there did not seem to be a way up. With a machete and a little more effort i suspect the hill could be conquered.

    Many locals camp on the island at weekends and i would recommend that you should go to the island with friends, a case of beer, meat and fish to BBQ, and a tent for an ideal weekend. Bring plenty of water with you and don't leave your rubbish behind.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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    RENT A BOAT TO CAPONES ISLAND

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    Capones Island
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    Most bangkas were heading towards Anawangin Cove so we decided to avoid the crowds and decided to head off to Capones Island, perhaps a 30 minute or less bangka ride from the shore. Just head along the beach and ask anyone with a bangka to take you there, but bargain about the price as you will be asked for inflated prices. We bargained our Bangkero down from 1,200 to 800 pesos, which i believe was a fair enough rate. I know that some time ago the regular price was 700 but i was prepared to believe the boatman when he said it was more expensive due to inflation (maybe i was fooled!). The boatman dropped us off on the is;and where we never saw another soul. The boatman anchored away from the shore and tried his luck at fishing and when we felt that we had had enough we signaled for him to take us back.

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    EXPLORE THE VILLAGE

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    THE BIRTHING STATON
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    If you walk away from the beach, turn left about 200 m before the road ends and head inland you will see the part of the village that few tourists see. The village probably goes back at least 500-600 m and you will be invited to drink or play cards with the friendly locals. The village straddles the river as it goes inland, but the only way to cross the river is by bangka or swimming. I saw many villagers playing the local card game, Tongit,( similar to rummy), each gambling for small stakes. There were also locals playing Mahjong, the Chinese game with tiles and it seemed to me that not so many people were working, but were probably gambling their tourist income away , or benefiting from remittances abroad. We came across the brand new birthing station, where the ladies go to give birth with the help of a midwife, which is quite common to see in Philippine towns and villages.

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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    FANCY A SNACK???????????

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    too early, not much for sale.

    Visit the local bakery which is about 50 meters down a small lane next to Megan's Resort. You will see it on your right hand-side with the freshly baked items in a glass counter. Best time to go would be towards noon when there is a fresh supply of local cakes such as spanish bread, pan de coco , pudding and other local favorites available. If you are looking for pandesal early morning, forget the bakery as it is not baked here.

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    OBSERVE THE FISHERMEN

    by davidjo Written Jul 20, 2013
    Preparing the fishing nets
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    Wander along the beach early morning or late afternoon and you will see the fishermen repairing their nets or preparing their boats for the night's fishing. Most fishermen will leave late afternoon and arrive back in Pundaquit between 6 and 9 am the next morning. When their bangkas arrive there is no shortage of locals to help carry the boat up the beach while the local ladies rush to see what the catch is, hopefully to buy the fish and sell around the village. Many of the fish go straight to San Antonio to be sold in the town market.
    Unfortunately the one or two boats that i observed arriving on the beach barely had enough fish to feed the fishermen's family. Quite disappointing for a full night's work.

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    • Fishing
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  • recommended boatman

    by ellesil Written Nov 22, 2011

    you can go snorkling and mountain trekking in anawangin and capones island.a very relaxing place and a very fresh tourist detination. you can go ask for assistance to kuya jay-r who accompany us in our tour. this is his number:09173809104.

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  • kemisteryoso's Profile Photo

    Capones Island

    by kemisteryoso Updated May 2, 2011

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    capones island
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    Capanones Island was my next destination after Camara Island and it took 25 minutes to get into this island. It was a splashy journey for me. I thought we will go directly to the western shore facing Camara but we docked to the eastern shore of the island. The captain said it is not possible to dock on its western shore because of the waves and it is the usual jump off point because it is much safer though much tougher for me if going to the light house.
    The island is so great and like Camara Island it is a good subject for photography.The island is mostly rocky shores with nice rock formations but it also has an area in which you can lie down and feel the fine sand. What I like this Island is the hike to its center, the view here is perfect and of course the lighthouse.

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  • kemisteryoso's Profile Photo

    Camara island

    by kemisteryoso Updated May 2, 2011

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    One can do island hopping for only P1200 whole day and 3 destinations. It can be cheaper depends on season and your haggling power.
    This is my first destination and it is the closest island from brgy. Pundaquit coast. I thought Capones and Camara are near to each other but as I approached the island they are not. I'm lucky the sea was calm though battering waves can be seen as you approach the island. It is a 25-minute boat ride.
    At Camara island, it's beautiful, clear water, rock formations and the view of the whole coastline of Brgy. Pundaquit and the towering mountains plus the open blue sea in between made everything perfect. The towering rocks dwarfs tourists actually. I climbed a rock there very carefully then I went down to see a cave like structure which can be a route to the other side of the island but the waves didn't allow me to cross. I tried but they were strong and I nearly hurt myself.
    Camara island looks like 2 islands during high tide but they are connected by a sandbar which is visible during low tide.

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  • IamPam's Profile Photo

    Camwhore in Anawangin

    by IamPam Updated Apr 30, 2011
    Rocky Shore of Anawangin
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    I have been hearing this camping sanctuary for almost 4 years now and I've been meaning to go here but haven't got the time so when I have finally got the chance to...Man oh man!

    As soon as we landed in Anawangin, my camera didn't stop flashing. What you want to do when you're there is to walk where the lake is and just go crazy! The scenery there is just breath taking, I highly recommend it.

    Anawangin has been a popular camping site so expect a tent city when you're there. And if you're planning to go swimming, I recommend that you bring some swimming shoes because some part of the beach is rocky plus the sand can be scorching hot during the day.

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    • Backpacking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

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  • kemisteryoso's Profile Photo

    Trek to Capones Light House

    by kemisteryoso Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    This is what I'm really after,the old lighthouse Faro de Punta Capones on the Isla de Gran Capon finished in 1890 and built to guide ships entering and leaving Manila Bay and Subic. Its operation ceased since 2006. It also reminds me of the Bojeador lighthouse of Ilocos except this one is smaller.The old structure was made of red bricks and it's very creepy.
    I'm actually jumpy and nervous because they said that the remains of a girl who fell on a well near the lighthouse was still there. I jumped out the window to have a photo of the whole lighthouse. The view here was spectacular. This is the main reason why I crossed the island. The mid day sun was not able to stop me to see the lighthouse
    The lighthouse is in pretty bad shaped with broken windows and rubbish littered on the floors. It's like the Guisi lighthouse ruins actually except that the lighthouse is well maintained. I took photos quick because I don't want to stay longer. The place was eerie and I had goose bumps.
    It reminds me the view in Guisi lighthouse.

    How to go there:

    Walk your way to the western shore by crossing the island then log your name at the marine detachment located on that area and start walking toward the northern shore. This is a rocky journey. There's a marker instructing tourist when to start the hike to the Lighthouse. Just follow the dirt path.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Anawangin Cove

    by kemisteryoso Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    My Last stop is the famous Anawangin cove. It is the most popular destination for campers and beach goers in Zambales because of its serene and unique beauty. It took me about 30 minutes from Capones to this Pine-invaded-cove. Once you reached the lone rock in the middle of the sea, you will notice the lush green trees at the base of the mountain. It is crescent in shaped cove with unusual towering pine trees flourishing round its vicinity with bamboo tables under it. I never saw any coconut trees. There are cottages ongoing constructions at the time of my visit. The place is very quiet and relaxing during off peak seasons not much tourist and not crowded. You can enjoy it more. I love the mixture of white and black sand or volcanic ash with and its clear water.
    They said, Anawangin is also accessible by trekking but it will take 4 to 6 hours to do that. There’s a fee of P50.00 for maintenance purposes.

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    • Beaches
    • Camping

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  • nagsasa cove

    by diet10 Updated Nov 23, 2010

    The anawangin cove is getting overcrowded and dirty, the other escapade you should try is the nagsasa cove, its like getting to new zealand without the black and white cow. :)
    Theres also a nearby waterfalls you can explore to complete your adventure..
    Its like getting out of the country..

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    • Camping
    • Beaches

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  • taguigboy's Profile Photo

    Anawangin Cove - Daytrip or Camping

    by taguigboy Written Mar 25, 2008

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    We made a daytrip to Anawangin cove, which is 20 minutes away by boat from Pundaquit Beach, or 2-3 hours if you go hiking. Anawangin is unique because the white sand beach is frayed by pine trees and surrounded by mountains. There is also a lagoon and a freshwater stream just on the other side of the beach.

    People go here to go camping overnight. There are around 4 toilets and deepwell pumps.

    You need to pay PHP 50.00 (USD1.25) per person since this is private property. I'm guessing you need to pay more if you're camping.

    Bring your own cooking facilities and food because there are no open kitchens here nor is there a market. It's just a cove with a white sand beach and pine trees and a stream with mountains as a backdrop. But it's hauntingly enchanting.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping
    • Beaches

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Pundaquit Things to Do

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