Kranji Off The Beaten Path

  • Basking in the Sungei Buloh
    Basking in the Sungei Buloh
    by bpacker
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by bpacker
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by bpacker

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Kranji

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    The Resident Croc in Sungei Buloh

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Basking in the Sungei Buloh

    I was birding near the entrance of the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves (Singapore) when I heard some shouts coming from the far end of the bridge. Hoping for some excitement, I hurried over and saw some teenagers pointing to what look like a brown log in the water.

    The park ranger rushed over too, thinking someone might turn into an intrepid Steve Irwin .

    Luckily, for the ranger, there wasn't an Irwin wannabe but... Crickey, there was a 1.2m long crocodile in the water! The brown sod just basked in the afternoon sun and occasionally gave us that devil-may-care look from below the water.

    After deciding that all of us weren't going to attempt any nasty stunts, the ranger walked away after telling us a tasty tidbit or two. This croc, he said, was only 2 years old and a regular resident over here. He can be found near the visitor's entrance during the low tide.
    I wondered why.

    Was the croc waiting a careless tourist ( or in crocodile speak: juicy hors deurves) to fall off the bridge?

    Well, since I had no wish to be croc fodder, I watched my footing , snapped away and promised a few excited fellas there that I would post the photo to them so that they can show off the crocodile to their friends.

    Note: Yes, it's not unusual to see wild crocs in Singapore. Occasionally, we do have a few crocs who push their luck by venturing into the town areas of Boat Quay ( Singapore River ) , Anson Road and even residential areas like Woodlands Town Garden. Needless to say, these sods were captured and thrown into the zoo.

    Useless note: The malay name for crocodile is Buaya. But the term buaya over here is also used synomously with any male who loves to flirt .

    Name:Estuarine Crocodile
    Scientific Name:(Crocodylus porosus)

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    Asian Koel

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    Though this bird looks like hawk-like, it's an Asian Koel and a bane to all crows. Yes, over here in Singapore, these birds love to dump their eggs into the nests of the unsuspecting crows. So, yes, it behaves like a cuckoo.

    Name: Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea)

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    Yellow Vented Bulbul

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    This is the most common bird in Singapore, next to the house crow so chances are, you'll see this easily. Here's a nice shot of a mother and a hungry child in the flowering fig tree near the entrance of a park.

    Name:Yellow-vented Bulbul
    Scientific Name:Pycnonotus goiavier
    Malay Name: Merbah Kapur

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    Asian Glossy Starling

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    Also a common bird in Singapore, most locals mistake this chatty birds for crows. But this bird is smaller and has glowing red eyes, making it look a tad evil.

    Name:Asian Glossy Starling
    Scientific Name:Aplonis panayensis
    Malay Name: Perling Mata Merah

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    Collared Kingfisher

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    This chappie is the most common kingfisher and loves to perch around the banks of the river near the entrance of the reserve. He's a lovely sight to behold since he's in a soothing shade of turqouise blue.

    Name: Collared Kingfisher
    Scientific Name:Halcyon chloris
    Malay Name: Pekaka Sungei/Bakau

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    Black Naped Oriole

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    This is the masked bandit bird of Singapore. Yes, this yellow chappie wears a black mask making it look like the Zorro of Singapore.

    Name: Black-naped Oriole
    Scientific Name: Oriolus chinensis
    Malay Name: Kunyit Besar

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    Olive Backed sunbird

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    Singaporeans love to call this little fella a hummingbird but if truth be told, they cannot hover like a true hummingbird. And hummingbirds are only found in the Americas. This little fella prefers to sit on a branch and sip their nectar.

    Name: Olive-backed Sunbird
    Scientific Name:Nectarina jugularis
    Malay Name: Kelichap Bukit

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    Pink Necked Green Pigeon

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

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    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    Believe or not, these green pigeons used to be shot for food during the colonial days. I guess their full plumage didn't do justice to them and probably reminded the colonialists of savoury pigeon stews. In any case, they are not as plentiful in the old days but still can be found in parks.

    Name:Pink-necked Green Pigeon
    Scientific Name:Treron vernans
    Malay Name:Punai Kerichau/Gading (Malay)

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    Yellow Bittern

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    Don't get fooled by my picture. Even though this little fella looks big in closeup, he's only about 38cm big and is probably the smallest bittern in Asia. He's well camoufladged so see if you can spot him among the reeds in river.

    Name:Yellow Bittern
    Scientific Name: Ixobrychus sinensis
    Malay Name: Pucong Kuning

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    White Breasted Water Hen

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    This is a common water bird in Singapore and the can be seen in ponds, walking on lotus leaves, searching for tidbits.

    Name: White-breasted Waterhen
    Scientific Name: Amaurornis phoenicurus
    Malay Name:Ruak-Ruak, Uwak-Uwak, Ayam-Ayam

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    Mangroves

    by StayNuts Written Aug 14, 2008

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    Shaded areas indicate the extent of mangrove forest. The Kranji River is an example of a former mangrove estuary dammed to become a freshwater reservoir. It is also the type locality of the "Kranji series" of soils, a characteristic of Singapore mangroves. The mudflats beyond the tree line are continuous with the Mandai and Buloh systems. The Kranji mudflats (off KR 1 and KR 2) are probably the most popular site presently for weekend fishermen and their families, who exploit the mudflats for molluscs, crabs and fish.

    Mangrove forest cover has been reduced from an estimated 13% in the 1820's to only 0.5% of the total land area. Mangrove forest is now found only in small patches with the largest areas in the northern part of the main island and on Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Pulau Semakau. In the 90's, large mangrove areas west of the Causeway were developed for housing and other uses.

    The mangrove forests that remain are no longer complete ecosystems. As with habitats all over Singapore, animals at the top of the food chain have long since disappeared. In mangroves, this means the absence of tigers and crocodiles. However, this also means that it is relatively safe for researchers to explore without fear of disappearing!

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Photography

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    Spotted Dove

    by bpacker Updated Sep 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Though Singapore is highly urbanised, we do have large pockets of greenery and more than 200 species of birds over here. Here's a rough sample of birds that you can probably see in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves.

    I love the Malay name for this common Singapore bird - Terkukur . It sounds just like the sound that the spotted dove makes.

    Name:Spotted Dove
    Scientific Name:Streptopelia chinensis
    Malay Name:Terkukur

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    Mangroves

    by signedbytheo Written Jan 17, 2006

    Shaded areas indicate the extent of mangrove forest. The Kranji River is an example of a former mangrove estuary dammed to become a freshwater reservoir. It is also the type locality of the "Kranji series" of soils, a characteristic of Singapore mangroves. The mudflats beyond the tree line are continuous with the Mandai and Buloh systems. The Kranji mudflats (off KR 1 and KR 2) are probably the most popular site presently for weekend fishermen and their families, who exploit the mudflats for molluscs, crabs and fish.

    Mangrove forest cover has been reduced from an estimated 13% in the 1820's to only 0.5% of the total land area. Mangrove forest is now found only in small patches with the largest areas in the northern part of the main island and on Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Pulau Semakau. In the 90's, large mangrove areas west of the Causeway were developed for housing and other uses.

    The mangrove forests that remain are no longer complete ecosystems. As with habitats all over Singapore, animals at the top of the food chain have long since disappeared. In mangroves, this means the absence of tigers and crocodiles. However, this also means that it is relatively safe for researchers to explore without fear of disappearing!

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

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