Local traditions and culture in Singapore

  • Changi Airport
    Changi Airport
    by balhannah
  • Changi Airport
    Changi Airport
    by balhannah
  • Changi Airport
    Changi Airport
    by balhannah

Most Viewed Local Customs in Singapore

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    SINGAPORE AIRPORT FLORAL DISPLAYS

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2013

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    If you have some time between flights, then why not follow the Nature walk at Changi Airport. I have, and seen most of the beautiful plants and flowers mentioned on this page.

    The open-air rooftop at Terminal 1, Departure lounge on Level 3..........
    Has a Cactus and Sunflower garden, where 40 species of cacti and succulents from Africa and the America's, and a collection of Cycads, Euphorbia's and Dracaenas are growing.
    Light-themed garden by night (7.00pm - 7.00am, daily).

    Terminal 2, Departure Transit Lounge, Level 2.....
    Has giant Tasmanian tree ferns along with tropical tree ferns, Bird Nest Ferns and others. Amongst this setting is a Koi Pond teeming with koi.
    It wouldn't be Singapore if it didn't have an Orchid display, and here on the same level is where the
    massed display of tropical and temperate orchids are found. The garden also features a changing exhibit of rare orchids and seasonal display of Singapore's National Flower.

    The World's first Butterfly Garden
    located at Terminal 3, Departure Transit Lounge, Level 2 I haven't seen yet. The Butterflies are housed in a habitat full of flowering plants, shrubs and a waterfall. The garden is also home to a collection of 200 carnivorous or insectivorous plants.

    I also found huge vases full of fresh flowers on my walk. What a wonderful airport Changi is, one where I can relax and enjoy the surroundings.

    Changi Airport Changi Airport Changi Airport Changi Airport
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    Satay

    by machomikemd Written Jun 26, 2012

    the Satay is the Malaysian and the Indonesian Version of Barbecue and since both are Muslim Majority Countries, you would hardly see pork satay in these countries except for the chinese living in these countries and HERE at Singapore where there is a version called Satay BABI (pork). Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, tofu, or other meats. These cuts are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings and peanut sauce since the mainstay of a satay is the peanut sauce and the coloring is yellow from the Turmeric. You will see many roadside stalls and hawker centers in and around Singapore selling this barbecue goodness and are eaten either alone or with Lemak rice or Curry rice or Biryani Rice and the cost is about $ 1 per small bamboo stick. Highly recommended and i can eat about 6 to 7 sticks in one sitting hehehehe.

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    Melting Pot

    by deeper_blue Written Jun 17, 2012

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    Singapore is largely of Chinese background but there are many different ethnicities present from Asia and the west. Malays, Vietnamese, Indians are also present. Chinese and English are the main languages although there is also a dialect called Singlish. It is a crowded island however but a well-off one. Locals dress to impress here.

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    RIP Uncle Arthur

    by AngMimi Written Mar 29, 2012

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    Dear Uncle Arthur
    We all missed you.

    My uncle died of cancer on 10th March 2012 at age 80, he gone peacefully without any pain.

    Cremation on 14th March 2012 at Mandai Crematorium and Columbarium Complex.

    At St Stephan Church At Service Hall 3 My aunt, Dorothy, Gerard and Molly at Mandai crematorium and columbarium

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    Singapore Unique Clothes Hanging

    by AngMimi Written Mar 29, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I don’t know if I should call it unique or an eyesore.
    I walked around Upper Aljunied Flats and Apartment one morning, oh dear, I still see clothes hanging on long poles, sticking out from the window, bedsheets, trousers, towels, blouses, blankets and underwears also hanging out for drying.
    Mind your head please…dripping waters from above. I thought its bad luck to walk under clothes line and Singapore don’t believe such pantang (abstinence) ;-)) Come on, its pure rubbish to say, it is good to hang clothes under the sun as free, killing the germs on clothing, prolong the life of clothings.

    I can still remembered, a man selling multi coloured poles in his truck and go around Singapore flats and apartment and going honking…pooot…pooot..
    So if you need any new poles, come down and buy. My aunt also have these long poles to hang the clothes.

    In Penang Island or the whole Malaysia, I don’t see clothes hanging like that. I have two balconies at home, one beside the kitchen, where I hang my clothes and my colourful underwears I hang in the bathroom.

    And some sad cases, Indonesian maids fell out from the kitchen window and landed on the ground while putting out clothes for hanging. I think its very dangerous house-chores I don’t want to do. :-((

    Clothes hanging at Upper Aljunied Clothes hanging at Hougang Keith said these are not granny panties Hanging clothes at my aunt's house

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    Singapore Sling

    by Manara Updated Sep 13, 2011

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    The Singapore Sling is a cocktail belonging to the internationally known long-time classics.
    It was invented sometime between 1910 and 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, the barman of the Long Bar of the Raffles Hotel.
    Nowadays the Raffles is not the only place where you can have a Singapore Sling, moreover many barmen have made some variants to it, so it may be interesting, when staying in Singapore, to go to a different bar every night, and try different versions of this cocktail.
    Ingredients include gin, cherry brandy, Benedictine, grenadine, pineapple juice, lemon juice and a drop of angostura. It is always served with a cherry as a decoration.

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    TAXI! BUS! MRT!... FEET!

    by PandawitchElphie Updated Jul 27, 2011

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    Singapore is a tourists paradise when it comes to transportation. You get to choose whether to travel by MRT, by bus or by taxi. You can even travel by Duck! (google: DUCK TOURS). And, being the logistical wizards that they are, they even put up this nice payment system.

    Introducing, the EZ LINK card. You should get one. This little card (once you top it up with cash) (think S$20 for the entire 4 days you'll be there) will serve you well and save you time. With the EZ LINK card, you don't have to keep lining up for MRT tickets. You can just "tap" in. (you place the card on top of the sensor. "TAP" and voila! You can enter!). No more lining up with the infernal machines. Also, the EZ LINK cards are welcome in MRTs, BUSES and even SOME Taxi's (you just have to watch out for the sticker on the window).

    By the way, I've kept the same EZLink card for more than a year. :) I just keep topping up when I go back. The thing doesn't expire. :)

    Oh and.. they accept the EZLink for the Sentosa Monorail and Boardwalk.

    Let's talk BUS. Almost everywhere you go, there should be a bus stop nearby. And at every bus stop, there's a "GUIDE" telling you which numbered bus to take to go where. I have to admit, I don't take buses much in Singapore. The numbers confuse me. I prefer "colors" (I'll explain later with the MRT system). And surprisingly, I've yet to see them give out time scheds or a map of what bus to get to take you where. I heard that I'd have to buy this mythical list but... *shrugs*, I'm too cheap to do it. Why should I? The MRT and taxis serve me well. Anyway, in case some of you may be smarter than me (regarding the bus system), here's what I found on the web for you http://www.sbstransit.com.sg/transport/trpt_bus_inter.aspx Good luck!

    Now, about TAXI's. Some accept cash, some accept credit cards (yes they do)... (take note: I said some) and some accept EZ LINK Cards. You should however, have singapore dollars to pay them. I've spoken to a taxi driver that asked me "How much 1 australian dollar is in singapore dollars" and when I googled to check, he sorta got depressed. Turns out he got ...err...'cheated'. So be nice, and pay the kind men (or in one instance, woman) in singapore dollars. Oh and about tipping here in Singpaore, I was very surprised that they return even the smallest coin of 10 cents! Yes, they're exact to the point of no return. If you're bill is 3.20 and you give 3.50, he'll return .30 to you. Don't be guilty of not tipping the taxi people. Locals don't do it. They consider the initial flag down fare (which is included into your bill) more than fair.

    Oh and... they only allow maximum four (4) passengers per taxi. So if there are 5 of you in the group, split up. OR you can take a limo taxi (slightly bigger but not the full length limo we see in hollywood). I suggest you split up.

    Now the taxi payment thing (I forgot what you call it) has different 'surcharges'. Pay attention to this before you get into an argument with your taxi driver. :) There are certain "hidden fees" that get added to your total amount on the meter. Be aware of what they are. (for the most part, I just listen to the taxi driver-- I haven't been cheated yet in my 8 trips to Singapore).

    Normal flag down rate is S$3 (this is added to your total on the meter). If you get the limo, I think it's an additional S$4.
    Mondays to Fridays at 7am to 930am and 5pm to 8pm (PEAK HOURS), there is a 35% surcharge on your entire bill. (Yes, gasp all you want. Taxi's are expensive in singapore)(avoid taking taxis at peak hours).
    Midnight. If you get a taxi at midnight... you get a 50% surcharge of your entire bill. So plan your trip. Try not to stay out beyond 11pm. Else the MRT trains will shut down on you and you've no choice but to board the taxi.
    Also, if you travel to the central business district from 5pm to midnight, there's ANOTHER surcharge of S$3 to be addd to your initial flag down fee.
    If you're coming from the airport (PSST!! Attention please on this one as most of us will always be coming from the airport), there is an additional S$5 surcharge on top of everything.

    TIP: it's cheapest to take a taxi on Sundays. So, for me, we travel around via MRT until my legs refuse to walk anymore, and that's the only time we take taxis. But on sundays, my boyfriend likes to spoil me with taxis since it's cheaper. :D LoL!
    Another piece of advice: If you're wondering how much it'd cost from the airport to ...say... Orchard road via taxi when you arrive... think somewhere around S$25.

    Oh and... Once you arrive in Singapore, select SINGTEL as the network to use (or get a local prepaid sim at the nearby 7-11 stores). And input these numbers into your phone already. Taxi numbers, when you want to call a taxi to come pick you up. You see... taxi lines in singapore can become anacondas. Meaning...it'll snake on forever. You can be smart and call for a taxi and skip the line. Don't think of it as rude. Think of it as smart. Plus, you're paying for the additional flagdown fee so you're ok. There is an additional S$3.50 when you call a taxi over to come get you. But for me... it's worth it. I don't want to grow old in line.

    (Especially helpful when you go to popular out of the way places like Jurong Bird Park, The Singapore Zoo and certain malls along Orchard).
    ** if you're using a local network already (or the prepaid card) remove the (65) and just dial straight.
    Comfort City Cab (65) 6552 1111
    Dial-a-Cab 6342 5222
    SMRT Taxi 6555 8888
    SMART Cabs 6485 7777
    Transcab 6555 3333

    All you have to do is call, they'll ask you for your name, your location (try to be at the taxi stand or corner or entrance of the place you are) and they'll tell you the plate number of the cab coming to get you. :) (I LIKE this system of theirs).

    As for the MRT... it's the easiest for me to understand. The maps are color coordinated and it runs like clockwork. :) For me, it's the cheapest way to get around Singapore. When you arrive at the airport, grab hold of those singapore maps. It'll have the MRT stops/map on it. :) Which should tell you what the nearest one is to your destination.

    And most of all... best transportation in Singapore? Your feet. You're gonna do a LOT of walking. Makes it so logical why there are so many spas around with posters saying "FOOT MASSAGE HERE".

    Hope this helps you get around Singapore better. :)

    My EZLink card of 2 years. I like Comfort Cabs the best. Buses are like Greek to me.... confusing. Rare Sighting: Empty MRT station Chinatown MRT during the Festival of Lights
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    5 Circles Around Suntec City Fountain of Wealth

    by machomikemd Updated May 20, 2011

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    there is this local superstition of which you must circle the Suntec city's famous Fountain of Wealth five times so that you will become lucky since the number 5 and fountain in Fujian or Minnan Language of China rhymes with luck. Also the Fountain of wealth of Suntec City is the Largest Fountain in the World. During certain periods of the day, the fountain is turned off and visitors are invited to walk around a mini fountain at the centre of the fountain's base for good luck. At night, the fountain is the setting for laser performances, as well as "live" song and laser message dedications between 8pm to 9pm.

    the Suntec City fountain of wealth is at: 3 Temasek Blvd. Singapore
    Tel No: 6295 2888
    Nearest MRT is Promenade Station

    fountain of Wealth water circle circling around
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    Cendol

    by machomikemd Written May 16, 2011

    the cendol is a trans southeast asian dessert that you can taste even in thailand, vietnam, malaysia, myanmar, indonesia and here in tiny Singapore. It is one of my favorite Southeast asian desserts and cendol or chendol is made from coconut milk, a worm-like jelly made from rice flour with green food coloring (usually derived from the pandan leaf), shaved ice and palm sugar. Next to these basic recipe, other ingredients such as red beans, glutinous rice, grass jelly, creamed corn and the taste is oh so heavenly. the chendol is available everywhere like in food stalls or food courts, markets, malls, hawker centers and hotels. the price of a chendol in a glass is about $ 1.50 and is truly a refreshing drink cum dessert on a hot and humid day in tropical Singapore.

    yummy have some more eat your chendol where's my chendol?
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    Ais Kacang

    by machomikemd Updated May 16, 2011

    Originally an Indonesian Shaved Ice Specialty but also popular in Nearby Singapore. the southeast asian and east asian region are crazy about iced shaved desserts and here in Singapore is no exception, one of the most popular iced shaved drink cum dessert is the Ais Kacang is the Malaysian and Indonesian version of the korean patbingsu and the japanese kakigori and the Thai Nam Kang Sai and the Philippine Halo Halo. Being a tropical country, Malaysians love cold desserts and Ais Kacang is on the top of the list. The Ais Kacang basically has a large serving of attap chee (palm seed), red beans, sweet corn, grass jelly and cubes of agar agar as common ingredients. Other less common ingredients include aloe vera in one form or another (e.g. jelly), cendol, Nata de coco or ice cream in various variants of the dessert. A final topping of Evaporated milk, condensed milk, or coconut milk is drizzled over the mountain of ice along with red rose syrup. It is available everywhere especially at food stalls and hawker centers and costs $ 1.40 an order.

    yummy another version ating have some with chocolate
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    Pulled Milk Tea (Teh Tahrik)

    by machomikemd Written May 16, 2011

    the teh tahrik or pulled milk tea is a malaysian indian (or singaporean indian) invention. Why is it called teh tarik? ok since the mixture is poured back and forth repeatedly between two vessels from a height, giving it a thick frothy top (also known as pulled). This process cools the process fluid (tea) to optimal drinking temperatures, and helps to thoroughly mix the tea with the condensed milk. It is also done to give the tea a better flavor. This is often compared to the decantering of toddy to improve the flavor function. Often found in Indian hawker stalls or restaurants, preparing the teh-tarik is both an art and science. they are found everywhere in Singapore especially at the Hawker Centers and Food Courts and in the whole of Singapore wherein a small glass costs about $ 1.50 and a big glass at $ 2 and is available hot or cold.

    Read more: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/db569/13901a/a/#ixzz1MZcz1jfX

    hot in food courts buying cold make mine cold
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    WANT ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS?

    by balhannah Written Dec 8, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WANT TO FIND OUT TO SOME ANSWERS?

    Perhaps a visit to a Temple, such as KUAN IM TONG HOOD CHE TEMPLE in Waterloo street, you can have a go at this for FREE!
    Other Temples do it to, I have tried, and unbelievebly, quite a few things came true!

    What you have to do is enter the Temple, pick up a bunch of sticks and two pieces of red wax from the counter.
    Kneel before the Goddess, shake the bunch of sticks, and one will fall out of the can onto the ground. Next, toss the 2 pieces of wax, and if one lands facing up and the other lands facing down, that stick will answer your question.
    Do not put the stick back into its holder (that stick has a number), but return to the counter where a slip of paper will be given to you with the answer in English if a tourist.

    If the 2 pieces of wax both land facing up or down, the stick on the ground will not answer your question. You'll have to replace the stick in its holder and re-do it all.

    KUAN IM TONG HOOD CHE TEMPLE
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    Bloody Sunday drivers

    by Henrik_rrb Written Nov 30, 2009

    In Sweden we have a way of saying when it comes to bad drivers - Sunday drivers. I'm not sure if the expression really comes from the Singaporean law system, but here you have a special kind of cars that are only allowed to be driven during the weekend and in the night.

    Background is that in Singapore there are way too many cars. And to prevent this problem to grow even bigger it's not only the car you'll have to buy, but also the right to drive it. That cost can be almost as much as you pay for the car.

    To give everyone at least a possibility to owe a car the Singapore leaders have issued two different id signs on the car. The black one, which is the normal one (and that you have a half leg and an arm for), the red one. That sign costs a lot less in tax and to buy, but it also means that you're only allowed to drive on certain hours of the week.

    Every day between 7pm and 7am.
    Saturday afternoon and night.
    The whole Sunday.

    If you do drive your car on other hours you'll risk a heavy fine. You can though use it legally if you pay 20 SGD (10 euro) per time you want to use it.

    The idea is good, but it also gives the country a whole lot of drivers who very rarely drives their car. And I think you all know what happens with your knowledges when you're not using them often enough.

    The guys with the red signs can't drive, simple as that. Same as in Sweden, when Sunday drivers are the ones who can't go in the right pace, they shift between the lines or use two at the same time, and are so careful when it comes to driving that they are a danger for both themselves and everyone around them.

    As if it wasn't bad enough that they were driving on the wrong side of the road... ;)

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    order by repression

    by woef Updated Aug 3, 2009

    ...and it seems to work.

    Never been in such a clean city before.
    No beggers in the street.
    great public transport.
    safe!
    hmmm , so what's the catch? no social security? expensive schooling ? no retirment plan ? I don't know , this city seems too perfect to be true ...

    singapore
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    THE LARGEST PORT IN THE WORLD

    by DAO Updated May 3, 2009

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    Singapore is the busiest port in the world. It is an absolute crossroads of the world and helps to explain its prosperity. Any good views of the ocean will reveal large container ships entering and leaving Singapore. The statistics are staggering. The port handles 17% of all transhipments in the world, over 200 shipping lines operate here, over 400 ships a day are served, and it’s connected to over 600 other ports in 123 countries. Also HALF the world's crude oil sails into this port. A trully amazing place.

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Singapore Local Customs

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