Haw Par Villa - Tiger Balm Gardens, Singapore

5 Reviews

262 Pasir Panjang Road, Singapore 118628 (65) 6-872-2780

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Haw Par Villa - Tiger Balm Gardens
    by LimS
  • Haw Par Villa Singapore
    Haw Par Villa Singapore
    by hengcc
  • Haw Par Villa - Tiger Balm Gardens
    by ekh86
  • imstress's Profile Photo

    Haw Par Villa

    by imstress Updated Nov 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Haw Par Villa
    4 more images

    Haw Par Villa is also known as Tiger Balm Garden. It is located at 262 Pasir Panjang Road (south-west). Not sure why it is not widely recommended to the tourist. Maybe its because the location is a bit off from most attractions.

    The admission is free of charge. You can see bus loads of Chinese tourist visting this attraction. I do see mostly foreign visitors viewing the exhibits in this attraction.

    There are 25 clusters of original statues and figurines which replicate the Chinese mythology characters like the Laughing Buddha and the Taoist deities, Fu Lu Shou.

    You must visit the Ten Courts of Hell exhibits which feature the ten steps of judgement before reincarnation. The statues are very literal and leaves no room for imagination. There are moral values and Chinese cultural heritage lessons to be taught to the future generations. There is an admission charge of $1. The Jade House also has an admission charge of $1.

    Even you may not believe in reincarnation or deities, it is still worth it to see what others believes are.

    If you like Tiger Balm, you may purchase a bottle at the stall at the entrance. They even comes in plaster to relieve pain in your muscles.

    Take SBS bus 200 from Buona Vista MRT Station (EW21), SBS bus 10, 30, SMRT Bus 188 from HarbourFront (after visit to Sentosa), SBS bus 143 from Orchard Road or SBS bus 51 from Chinatown.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Umea6's Profile Photo

    HAW PAR VILLA

    by Umea6 Updated Jan 11, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance

    ... also known as Tiger Balm Gardens. It is named after the owners - the Aw brothers, Boon Haw (Tiger) and Boon Par (Leopard) who first opened the park in 1937. The garden with its statues represent Chinese legends and mythology.

    The place is almost deserted with only a few visitors daily. But I heard this was a popular site for local families to have picnics here before thea started charging fees in 1985. Every statue on display has a story behind it. Unfortunally the statues are not in good shape anymore.

    the ruler of the gardens is, who else, but a dragon. It is 60 m long and you can enter it through mouth and walk along his body.

    The most scary or probably bizzare display is the 10 courts of Hell. Not one, but 10! Each court is ruled by a king (yama) who gives punishments according to the sins the person had committed in his life.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • LimS's Profile Photo

    No longer that inconvenient to visit Hell!

    by LimS Written Jan 23, 2013

    As a short background on this place, it was the abode of the Tiger Balm pioneers; the Aw brothers (Aw Boon Hor & Aw Boon Par, the latter being the elder and more flamboyant of the two). It was, however, primarily resided by Aw Boon Par as Boon Haw was based in Hongkong most of the time.

    It is, therefore, not surprising that there's a similar theme park-like residence to be found in Hongkong as well (now belonging to the Lee Kar Shing family).

    This place saw a few ups & downs as the government struggled to give Haw Par Villa a new breath of life with little success. With the opening of the Circle Line Station at Haw Par Villa, this place is now a little bit more livelier than before.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • Haw Par Villa

    by ekh86 Written Jun 17, 2013
    3 more images

    Haw Par Villa is a theme park located along Pasir Panjang Road, Singapore. The park contains over 1,000 statues and 150 giant dioramas depicting scenes from Chinese mythology, folklore, legends, history, and illustrations of various aspects of Confucianism.

    The park, originally called "Tiger Balm Gardens", was built in 1937 by the Burmese brothers Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, the developers of Tiger Balm, as a venue for teaching traditional Chinese values. They moved their business from Burma (Myanmar) to Singapore in 1926 and purchased the site in 1935.
    In 1988, the Singapore Tourism Board took charge of the Tiger Balm Gardens and renamed it "Haw Par Villa Dragon World". The "Haw Par" in the park's name is based on the Aw brothers' personal names - "Haw" and "Par", which literally mean "tiger" and "leopard". The dioramas and statues were restored, while plays, acrobatic displays, and puppet shows were organised and held there. The management imposed entrance fees but the high fees discouraged visitors, so the management incurred a loss of S$31.5 million after 10 years. The park management made profit during its first year of operations after renovations in 1994, broke even in 1995, but started making losses over the next three years and was forced to provide free entry in 1998. In March 2001, the Singapore Tourism Board renamed it "Tiger Balm Gardens" and entrance fees dropped.[1] The park is now open every day from 9am to 7pm and admission is free.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • A visit to Haw Par Villa or Tiger Balm Gardens

    by hengcc Written Jul 2, 2013
    Haw Par Villa Singapore

    This theme park on Chinese mythology is a must visit for all visitors. Take the MRT to the Haw Par Villa station and alight. On exit you will come to the entrance of the theme park. The architecture is traditional Chinese style and entrance is free.
    You will see the 10 gates of hell where the wicked are tortured by the god of hell. You will also see the characters of Journey to the West, a famous novel in which a monk set out to the West to discover the lost Buddhist scripture.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Singapore

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

56 travelers online now

Comments

View all Singapore hotels