Fun things to do in Singapore

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Singapore

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    Take a train ride to Bangkok from Singapore

    by PeterVancouver Updated Jul 7, 2014

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    I don't know what it is about train journey's, but perhaps its spending most of my life living in the UK, where you are never far away from the railway track, or perhaps I am now ancient enough to recall with nostalgia, the passenger steam engines that would carry us up to London, and the fast freight trains, that would roar through stations at speed in a cloud of smoke and steam, over the years I was growing up in England.

    We have been on a number of interesting rail trips overseas in the past few years, including a five night VIA rail journey across Canada from the Maritimes to our current home over the Rockies in Vancouver, or a two day Churchill to Winnipeg trip in the snow and -40C freezing conditions after Polar Bear watching in the Arctic where the locomotives had to run, even when not working, to prevent the lubrication and fuel from freezing.

    In warmer climates, overnight sleepers in Australia and a full western seaboard rail month long journey of India from Agra in the North, to Kovalam down South, stopping off at interesting places on route .

    It therefore became clear to us that before we fall of the perch, that we should do something that friends had suggested was maybe the ultimate in rail travel, by going on the E & O out of Singapore to Bangkok via the River Kwai

    After checking in at Raffles in the anti room of the Long Bar, the Eastern & Orient Express train leaves Singapore at around 16.00 hrs and arrives in Kuala Lumpur at 23.15. From there it continues up the Malaysian Peninsular through the night to Butterworth Station for a motorcoach and ferry excursion to Penang at 08.45 the second day, and leaves Butterworth at 11.30. During the early hours of the third day it crosses over into Thailand at Padang Besar and continues up the line to Hua Hin. Further up the line the train is stopped and an additional loco is fitted to the end of the train, behind the observation car to pull the train, complete with the original loco, up to Kanachanaburi and the Kwai Bridge arriving at 10.45.The final leg of the trip is leaving Kanachanaburi at 12.15 which generally gives an arrival in Bangkok Station at 16.45

    It is a trip of a lifetime and is hugely expensive at around $8,000 per couple for a Stateroom for the two nights/three days. The Train manager discussed with us back in Singapore, what made us make this journey which we answered in two parts one, being it was the same track my Uncle in the UK Army had been on from Changi after the fall of Singapore in 42, on his way to the Thai-Burma Death Railway. The second part of the answer was that a week previously, we had just celebrated our 40th Wedding anniversary.

    The trip was fine but In my mind having us spent this sort of money on their train, it would not have really dented their profits too much to have maybe provided a bottle of sparking wine in the State Room for our arrival on board as a welcome or maybe offered a glass at some stage during mealtimes or perhaps in the bar in the evening, during the journey. Instead we received nothing more than a somewhat hurried "bon appetite" to all guests each meal time from the Restaurant Manager.

    We have taken a number of Cunard voyages and transatlantic crossings over the past few years and without fail there was a minimum of a bottle of bubbly in the cabin upon arrival, and often a number of other "welcome" goodies, and this being at less than half the price we paid on this two night rail trip. These are not expensive for the carrier in the overall scheme of things, but certainly I would suggest that this does make the customer feel that at least there is some form of personal attention being paid.

    I made these comments to the E & O US office, as whilst living in the UK, were told by friends that some years ago, that they also had travelled on this train on a very special occasion, and that the Managers at that time, were certainly not slow in offering them the odd complimentary drinks during the trip. It could of course be that the new owners "Belmond", feel that margins have to be improved at the expense of the customer.

    To me the above has come across slightly as penny pinching on what otherwise would have been a great trip but which could have certainly been improved by a number of other small issues that in my opinion, could have been thought through collectively by the Organisation .

    I give it 8 out of 10, but upon reflection for the money involved and a little more attention to detail, it could and should, have been 10/10

    Eastern & Orient crossing the Kwai bridge Itinery for June 14 E & Orient Express to Bangkok Open observation car Wood panel State Room on the E & O Cars originally made in Japan for the NZ railway
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    Historic Anderson Bridge

    by PeterVancouver Updated Jul 5, 2014

    The Anderson bridge, which celebrates over a century since being erected in 1909, was named after Sir John Anderson who was the Governor of the Straits Settlements and High Commissioner for the Federated Malay States from 1904–1911. Most young Singaporeans would know it better for being part of the Singapore Grand Prix's Marina Bay street circuit.

    Unlike any other bridge in Singapore, the Anderson bridge is made up of intricate plaster and metalwork with rusticated archways and a fluted pier at each end.

    However, beneath its elegance lies a rather Inglorious past. During WWII and the Occupation the by the Japanese, they displayed heads of beheaded spies, on the steel columns of the Bridge as a warning to discourage citizens from following the same path.

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    Merlion

    by PeterVancouver Updated Jul 2, 2014

    The original statue at the Merlion Park measures 8.6 metres high and weighs 70 tonnes, and is one of Singapore’s most well-known icons. The lion head represents the lion spotted by Prince Sang Nila Utama when he re-discovered Singapura in 11 AD, as recorded in the "Malay Annals", and the fish tail of the Merlion symbolises the ancient city of Temasek (meaning “sea” in Javanese) by which Singapore was known before the Prince named it “Singapura” (meaning “lion city” in Sanskrit).

    The Merlion is representative of Singapore’s humble beginnings as a fishing village, and is a national icon that you must visit on your trip here.

    8.6m high and weighing 70 tonnes Merlion with Marina Bay Hotel With Business District behind
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    Singapore Flyer

    by PeterVancouver Updated Jun 30, 2014

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    The Flyer opened in 2008 and during that year had two major shut downs trapping a good number of people for up to seven hours before coming back to earth. Diameter: Singapore Flyer is 150 metres in diameter – Singapore Flyer measures 165 metres in height – considerably larger than the London eye at 135m. Each capsule is 4 metres x 7 metres – about the size of a city bus. There are 28 capsules. Each capsule can carry up to 28 passengers. Speed it travels: 0.24m per second, or 0.76km/h. Total capacity per revolution: 784 passengers. Boarding & Flying Boarding: To board the capsule, you use the “step on platform” – it’s like walking on level ground into the capsule. There are two synchronised doors and two platforms on each side – making it easy for the elderly and those in wheelchairs to get on and off. Rotation: Each rotation is about 32 minutes. Smooth Rotation: Singapore Flyer is designed and built to rotate smoothly under various wind conditions at high altitudes – thanks to precision wind engineering. View Radius: On board Singapore Flyer, you can see up to 45 kilometres away – that’s 3 kilometres more than the entire length of the city. Singapore Flyer uses a slim ladder truss rim – not the usual triangular rim used by other observation wheels.
    Due to financial problems the Flyer was put into receivership in May 2013 but is continuing to run whilst funding is being sort.
    See more at:

    http://www.singaporeflyer.com/about-us/fun-facts-about-the-flyer/#sthash.zXqbbYwc.dpuf

    Flyer from 23rd floor room of Fairmont Hotel Marina Bay Sands Hotel from the Flyer Financial District & Merlion Fairmont Hotel from flyer (white building center)
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    Skyscrapers

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 18, 2014

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    Considering Singapore is less than 700 km sq, smaller than my island, and has a population not far from 4 millions, skyscrapers are very frequent. By the way, the country can support about 12 millions people.

    Skycrapers

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    Visit Gardens by the Bay.

    by worldkiwi Written May 14, 2014

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    One of Singapore's newest attractions in 2014, was the stunning Gardens by the Bay. In May 2014, I had only about half a day to do some sightseeing in Singapore. Having seen some pictures of Gardens by the Bay, I decided not to spend my half day racing around, but instead, focused on this one attraction.
    I walked to Gardens by the Bay from Marina Bay and had to ask a security guard for advice on how to make the last bit of may walk as I couldn't see anyway of crossing the Bayfront Road! He pointed out an almost obscure little lift that like some unremarkable magic wardrobe, opened to reveal a way into this amazing garden.
    I was further surprised to realise that the Gardens by the Bay is mostly a free attraction! Visitors have to pay to go into the two conservatories and to take a skywalk around the 'super trees'. I paid for the Flower and Cloud Forest conservatories and received a small discount when I showed my Singapore Airlines boarding pass. With my discount, the combined ticket for both the conservatories was S$25.20.
    There was a tulip exhibition on in the Flower Conservatory and this was a real highlight. The Cloud Forest Conservatory has an intriguing walk up a man-made mountain with a waterfall.
    After dark there is a light show at the super trees. This is free and well worth seeing. I think mine was at 7.45pm.
    I ate at "Sate by the Bay" - a great meal at affordable prices - in the eastern part of the gardens and clearly sign posted.

    The 'super trees' at Gardens by the Bay, Singapore Gardens by the Bay at night, Singapore. The Flower Conservatory, Gardens by the Bay. Tulips in Singapore?  Yes, it's true - May 2014. Gardens by the Bay, Singapore.
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    Chinatown Heritage Centre

    by Drever Updated Apr 10, 2014

    Chinese were coming over to work on construction sites and as tailors, barbers, cobblers or servants from the early days of Singapore. Eventually they were to form 75% of the population and became ardent supporters of British ways.

    The Chinese in Singapore were integral to the development of the colony. To understand the part they played visit the Chinatown Heritage Centre a joint project between the Singapore Tourism Board and the National Heritage Board. It tells by video and artefacts the lives they expected to lead and the shocking lives they actually led.

    A block of old houses in which Chinese lived and ran their businesses forms the centre of the heritage centre. Now converted to their former state they bring back those earlier times.

    Life of the ethnic Chinese in these days was simple and almost everyone lived in rented cubicles. These often no longer than a bed length in one direction and little more in the other offered little space. Overcrowding created squalor, dirt and disease. In a space, which seemed impossibly small to live in, somehow they also carried out their trades.

    In the museum we walked through rooms filled with period antiques of coolie living quarters, shops, clan association houses, and other places that were prominent in daily life. The displays carry descriptions to explain the immigrants experience.

    The basement forms a part of a building where several families lived. How seven people could squeeze into the cramped space is unbelievable.

    Each of the three upper levels took us to a different time in the history of Chinatown and allowed us to trace the lives of its early occupants. The first level shows what life was like during the olden days when everyone lived in rented cubicles. These formed shop houses and business premises, which doubled up as sleeping quarters during the night.

    The hard life of the migrants resulted in many of them seeking solace in the four evils: opium smoking, prostitution, gambling and secret societies as explained on Level 2. On a brighter note, Chinatown, in its heyday, was also bustling with life and activity. Different races celebrated traditional festivals, thus making Chinatown culturally vibrant and unique. Level 3 showed celebrations of this 1950s era.

    Present-day Chinatown still bursts into life and colour during the festive season. Some of the more popular celebrations include the Lunar New Year, Mid-Autumn Festival and even Theemithi, the Hindu fire-walking ceremony.

    This museum is a must see for all those who wish to delve into the depths of Chinatown's past. It is a small, well laid out museum at 48 Pagoda Street in the heart of Chinatown. It takes only 45 minuets to an hour to visit the entire museum and the area is also an excellent place for souvenir shopping! Don't let this museum pass you by.

    The Chinatown Heritage Centre is open from 9:00 to 20:00 every day including public holidays. It also includes guided tours of its galleries every hour.

    Chinatown Heritage Centre Numerous small shops in China Town A small room in the centre
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    Buddha Tooth Temple

    by Drever Updated Apr 10, 2014

    This four-storey Temple sits majestically just down from the Scarlet Hotel at the edge of China Town. It is the biggest Buddhist temple in Singapore and one of the holiest shrines in the Buddhist world. A Chinese cultural complex it holds the Sacred Dendrobium Buddha Tooth and Relics, as well as many rare Buddhist artefacts on exhibition in its Museum.

    The Tang Dynasty inspired the architecture, interiors and statuary, an era when Buddhism flourished in China in an age of artistic and cultural vibrancy. Construction of the temple began in 2004 and finished in early 2007. It cost $50 million.

    Visitors are welcome as long as they follow some basic etiquette. Men should wear long trousers and women’s skirts should come well below the knee (although a sarong wrapped over shorts is acceptable) and no bare shoulders. Do not bring non-vegetarian food or pets inside the Temple. You can take photographs or use a camcorder, however it is bad manners to pose with your back to a statue of the Buddha, so please act with respect.

    As I entered the 27 feet high hall on the first floor I stood in awe of a 15-feet carved wooden Maitreya Buddha. One hundred Buddhas in various spiritual poses on both sides of the hall and 100 dragons hovering above them added to my awe. From the grandeur and fine detail seen in this hall alone, visitors can recognise the work of dedicated craftspeople that contributed their skills to building this Temple.

    This is a place of ardent warship. All day-long monks in this hall chant a mantra to the Buddha.

    The second floor is the Exhibition Hall is where you can learn about Buddhist. If you still crave for more, go up to the Buddhist Culture Museum on the third floor. It is hard after working through the history and beliefs of different religions not to think that all religions have a common thread. The thought struck me again here as it has done in other temples. The common thread is to do with bringing out the best in humanity – the reverse often happens!

    Up on the fourth floor sits the Buddha Tooth Relic inside a two-metre 420kg solid-gold stupa in a dazzlingly ornate room. The hall glitters with gold. Besides the stupa, the canopy above it and the tiles on the floor also carry gold veneer. At 10:30 and 19:30, the monks hold ceremonies to open the chamber.

    Also worth seeing are the peaceful rooftop garden, where a huge prayer wheel sits inside a Buddha Pavilion. Growing here are pure elegant blooms of the Dendrobium Buddha Tooth, an orchid species specially named after the temple. Visitors can also rest and enjoy refreshing tea and healthy vegetarian snacks in the cosy Lotus Heart Tea House on the 2nd floor or visit the Dining Hall in the basement where free vegetarian meals are available daily.

    A shop on the ground floor allows visitors to buy various items, including the Dendrobium Buddha Tooth orchid and books, CDs, handicrafts and commemorative souvenirs.

    The temple is a must-see for anyone interested in Chinese architecture and culture.

    Buddha Tooth Temple Inside Buddha Tooth Temple Inside Buddha Tooth Temple Inside Buddha Tooth Temple
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    Singapore River Cruise

    by Drever Written Apr 10, 2014

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    Having time to spare we decided to take a river cruise. It’s a relaxing way to see the waterfront city. We joined the boat, perhaps fittingly, at Raffles Landing Site. Back then when he landed all that existed here was virgin forest and a small fishing village.

    The Singapore River Cruises & Leisure Company ran the cruise. They pioneered river cruises through the city by introducing original bumboats to this leisure industry in 1887. These Chinese boats played an important role in developing the island into one of the world's busiest ports. Each boat has two eyes? The Chinese believed that these would guide the boat and passengers safely to their destination.

    When Raffles signed the agreement securing the memorable title of Free Port for Singapore, this triggered a landslide of immigrants from neighbouring countries. Within six months, Boat Quay, one of five quays Raffles had built, became a hothouse for trading, and in the 1860's, it accounted for three-quarters of all shipping businesses done at Singapore. Raffles statue at his landing site looks approvingly across at it. Here was the starting point of all that is Singapore today - wealth, hard work and a wish to succeed.

    Only a century ago, suntanned coolies balanced heavy gunnysacks of rice over their shoulders, with springy gangplanks under their feet, loaded and unloaded a bewildering array of produce from these bumboats to Boat Quay. Now these boats served to glide us smoothly under old and new bridges – each given its name and age by expert commentary. Towering office blocks in the financial area, historical monuments regally positioned, adding grandeur and age-old charm to the river area.

    Today, Boat Quay is still buzzing with life and activity. The waterfront now plays host to a colourful kaleidoscope of restaurants, wine bars, entertainment spots and retail shops. The bustling market atmosphere of bygone days still comes alive amid the rows of charming shops. A fellow passenger on the bumboat referred to it as ‘Robbers Quay’. Interested I asked him why he thought that. His experience had been similar to mine – persuaded to enter a restaurant by the promise of discounts which in no way brought the bill down to a reasonable figure. High restaurant bills thought seemed part of the course in Singapore – no doubt due to having no land mass to grow food.

    Clarke Quay further upstream is the site of scores of 19th century colonial warehouses converted into bars, outdoor restaurants, clubs, souvenir shops and mobile stalls that present the ‘Old Singapore’ to the tourists - a delightful mix of modern and traditional.

    Robertson Quay is another area of interest. It is the largest of the three quays. This lesser known gem of the Singapore River provides an interesting array of evening entertainment. Compared with Boat Quay, Robertson Quay is more laid-back, with an eclectic mix of international restaurants with alfresco dining, wine bars, arts houses and hotel cafes Each caters to a different type of crowd so it's well worth doing some exploring.

    At the downstream limit to the cruise is Merlion Park. Here stands the Merlion statue – the city’s iconic mascot with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. Every tourist with a camera lines it up in his or her lens.

    Moored along various parts of the river were many bumboats, which suggested that March was a low point in Singapore’s tourist season. Having the river mostly to ourselves added to the peacefulness of the occasion.

    The high rise buildings piercing the skyline Some of the art work along the river A bumboat taking visitors for a cruise on the rive Statue of Raffles where he first landed
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    Find things for yourself

    by Madasabull Written Jan 29, 2014

    That's right, you can go off all the tips and reviews about places to see and things to do, but a great way of enjoying this wonderful place, is to just take a walk, get out and have a look what is around you.

    Go down those tiny streets and places that look as though there couldn't be much there, you may be really surprised. This is what we do everywhere we go, and we never fail to find something amazing, or at the very least, interesting.

    I mean, check out this pic of a sign selling Durian Fruit Shaved Ice! I know, crazy, but great to find.

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    Marina Bay Sands Singapore

    by Madasabull Written Jan 29, 2014

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    Ive added this as thing to do, because we didn't stay in the hotel because we couldn't afford it, but we did have a great time in and around it.

    As soon as we saw it in the distance, we new we had to get to the top of it to see what was up there. And so walked about 2 miles in crazy heat to get there, and on entering the hotel, we were met with a super huge space, aircon, and a live band.

    Now, where is the elevator! Got, now straight to the top. As soon as we got out of the lift at the top, we could see a glass rail with amazing views, but to the left and right of us were guest only areas with spa's and an infinity pool overlooking the bay. Wow! If only we could have afforded to stay a night or 2.

    Back down stairs and there was access to one of the biggest and most expensive malls I have been in, access to subway trains, casino, and of course the Gardens By The Bay.

    All in all, this hotel is a must see, but if you can spend a night, then lucky you.

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    Gardens By The Bay

    by Madasabull Written Jan 28, 2014

    This was amazing, and I couldn't believe that there wasn't even any land here the last time I was in Singapore, let alone these amazing gardens. It was great to see space reclaimed and used for things other than shops and buildings, and no doubt this plan will add style and more visitors to Singapore in the future. I don't know what it is, but whenever we go anywhere and ask for a taxi to take us to places they know and like and that we would like, they first thing they say is "Shopping Mall?".

    Without fail this is where we get asked if we want to go the most, in most places we go, and I really, really hate shopping malls. I go to places to see the places, not to spend all my time in a shopping mall, but I suppose a lot of these people in poorer places, don't get much of a kick out of seeing wildlife and parks and the countryside, and so don't give it a thought that you would want to, I suppose.

    Anyway, it was great to see Singapore has introduced something other than tall building, shops and malls, although attached to the path that leads you to the gardens, is one of the most expensive malls Ive seen, with all of the top brands in it. So if malls are your thing, it's an expensive one.

    As we walked on the raised path from the hotels and malls, we could look down on the park and see how far it stretched. And the man made trees in the Supertree Grove where incredible. There are ponds, and real trees that have been brought in from many different countries, and there is a little bus that can take you to different stops around the park for next to nothing really.

    These gardens are amazing, and the park included three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden, Bay East Garden and Bay Central Garden. The idea I believe, is to turn Singapore from Garden City, to City in a Garden, which sounds great to me.

    See my video of the Gardens too.

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    Ancient Egypt at Universal Studios Singapore

    by hopang Updated Nov 11, 2013

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    Ancient Egypt was one of our favourite themed zones at Universal Studios Singapore. Lots of interesting attractions can be found at Ancient Egypt especially where and when you like artefacts from Golden Age of Egyptian Exploration in 1930s. Attractions at Ancient Egypt include giant statues of Arubis (as depicted on our second photograph), Pharaohs tombs, mummies, temples, obelisk (depicted on our fourth photograph) and pyramids.

    There are a couple of thrill rides at Ancient Egypt. Our favourite is of course the Revenge of the Mummy ride (depicted on our main photograph) which is basically a high speed indoor roller coaster ride in mine vehicles through a total darkness tunnel. The theme is of course based on the motion picture "The Mummy" with close encounter with the mummies and beetles etc. This thrill ride is somewhat scary as there are lots of sudden acceleration, deep fall, sharp twists and turns and even backwards motion. The ride lasts between five and ten minutes. The queue for this ride is also long as many youths love this attraction. Warning: This ride is absolutely not for the faint hearted.

    Another ride which is located at Ancient Egypt is Treasure Hunters (depicted on our last photograph) designed principally for kids and children of all ages. For more information you may e-mail to the following address:- enquiries@rwsentosa.com

    Revenge of the Mummy at Universal Studios Giant statues of Arubis at Ancient Egypt Egypt Trading Co. at Ancient Egypt An obelisk in Ancient Egypt at Universal Studios Treasure Hunters at Ancient Egypt
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    Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios

    by hopang Updated Nov 11, 2013

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    Transformers the Ride - the Ultimate 3-D Battle is regarded as one of the best theme park attractions in the world. So don't miss this particular attraction when you visit Universal Studios in Singapore. We certainly enjoyed this ride very much. The duration of the ride is approximately five minutes.

    This exciting ride consists of approximately 600 meters track with multiple large screens projecting 3-D special effects images based on motion picture with the same name "The Transformers" in case if you have not seen the movies. It is located at Sci-Fi City, one of the seven heavily themed zones of the Universal Studios in Singapore. This particular attraction is rather new throughout the world. It opened only two years ago and have already attract tens of thousands of visitors to the park. Be aware that the queue to this particular attraction is rather long.

    Guests prone to motion sickness, dizziness, or giddiness should not ride. For more information you may visit the below website or e-mail to the following address:- enquiries@rwsentosa.com

    Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios Transformers the Ride at Universal Studios
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    Universal Studios Singapore

    by hopang Updated Nov 11, 2013

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    Universal Studios Singapore is one of the largest Universal Studios outside USA. It is one of the major tourist attractions in Singapore and is considered by many a "must-visit" tourist attraction when you visit the city of Singapore on your vacation, business trip or on any other purposes. Universal Studios Singapore has approximately 20 exciting rides including roller coasters and water rides. It has seven heavily themed zones, i.e. Hollywood, New York, Sci-Fi City, Ancient Egypt, Lost World, Far Far Away and Madagascar. The theme of the park is Hollywood movies produced by Universal Studios.

    The highlight of our trip to the Universal Studios Singapore is riding the all action "Transformers the Ride" in 3-D. We really enjoyed and had a great time riding this wonderful attraction. Tickets for one day pass to Universal Studios Singapore is S$74.00 per adult and two day pass at S$118.00. There are also at least 30 eateries and other food outlets and 20 accessories stores for visitors to the park to patronise. For more information about the Universal Studios Singapore you may e-mail to the following address:- enquiries@rwsentosa.com

    Universal Studios in Singapore Universal Studios in Singapore Universal Studios in Singapore Universal Studios in Singapore Universal Studios in Singapore
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