Fun things to do in Singapore

  • Marina Bay Sands View of Marina Bay at Sunset.
    Marina Bay Sands View of Marina Bay at...
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  • Esplanade - Theatres by the Bay
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  • Old Peranakan houses
    Old Peranakan houses
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Singapore

  • MJL's Profile Photo

    Singapore Flyer

    by MJL Written May 3, 2015

    Singapore Flyer is the world’s largest observation wheel (outside United States). Standing at a stunning 165m from the ground, the Flyer offers you breathtaking, panoramic views of the Marina Bay, our island city and beyond. There’s also a wide range of shops, restaurants, activities and facilities. Please book your tickets online at this official site for your protection/assurance and after sales support.

    A view towards The Fulleron and centre Singapore Flyer
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    Sentosa Island

    by MJL Updated May 2, 2015

    Lot has happened since my previous visit. Resort World Sentosa has been built and you will find some nice hotels, an aquarium, a casino, Universal amusement park, dolphins etc. And of course there are many nice beaches some are very lively and some are more suitable for those loving be almost alone.

    Resort World Sentosa 2015 A Cable car to Sentosa island Aquarium A quiet beach Resort World Sentosa 2009
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    Spend a day a the zoo.

    by worldkiwi Updated Apr 27, 2015

    Singapore Zoo is a lovely, leafy, green parkland in the northern part of the city. On the bus out to the zoo from Ang Mo Kio, enjoy the view of suburban Singapore. Give yourself most of the day to enjoy a slow wander around the zoo. Highlights include the majestic white Bengal tigers, the remarkable open orangutan enclosure, and the tamarins that meet visitors at the entrance!

    One tip, if you can, take your own cold drinks (and plenty of them). Prices for bottled drinks are nearly twice what they are in a shop in town.

    From Singapore city, get to Ang Mo Kio on the SMRT. From there, there is a bus (#138) to the zoo. Follow the signs or ask advice in the SMRT station at Ang Mo Kio. Remember to have the right change for the bus. I think it was S$2.40 from Ang Mo Kio to the zoo (it's quite a long bus trip - by Singapore standards).

    A Bengal tiger relaxes in Singapore Zoo. Feeding time is a great experience.
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    RAFFLES HOTEL

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 12, 2015

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    This amazing hotel is a national landmark, and one of the first things visitors to Singapore visit.
    It opened in 1887. Many famous people have stayed here, including, Rudyard Kipling, Noel Coward, Somerset Maugham, Charlie Chaplin and Micheal Jackson. The hotel includes courtyards, gardens and walkways. It has a beautiful ornamental fountain that was made in Scotland in the early 1890’s. the fountain is made of cast iron and stands 6 metres high.
    The writers bar, which is in the lobby, has photographs of the many writers that have stayed here.
    The long bar, is the ideal place to partake of the famous “Singapore Sling”. This drink was created here by Ngiam Tong Boon, a bartender from Hainan (a small Chinese province). it was created in 1915 for women.
    In the gardens of the hotel, there are 80 different species of plants, with over 50,000 plants in and around the gardens.
    There ar a few restaurants in the hotel including Doc Chengs ( a western/oriental fusion), the Seah street deli (a New York style restaurant) and the Raffles Grill, one of the most prestigious restaurants in Singapore.
    The hotel also houses a museum detailing the history of the hotel and its guests.

    RAFFLES HOTEL

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    BOAT QUAY

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 12, 2015

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    This quaint street of bars and restaurants, lines the river Singapore. Tanks of sea creatures swim unsuspectingly as people pass by, peering into the tanks, choosing their lunch or dinner.
    At lunchtime, office workers leave their air-conditioned work places and meet collegues and friends for lunch. In the evening, couples and families sit by the river, enjoying a relaxing dinner.
    These restaurants used to be shop houses and warehouses, where people lived and worked. Now, with inflated rents, restaurants thrive where people once loaded and unloaded the “bumboats” that plied this once very busy quay.
    In the 1860’s the “bumboats” would ply the river between the big ships, anchored further upriver, and the shop houses and warehouses.
    In the 1960’s container ports opened further up the river, this gave the traders easier access to land and the traders. The boat quay went into decline. The government cleared the quay and left the area abandoned.
    The government started to restore the area in 1986 as part of a conservation project. They pedestrianized the area and renovated the shop and warehouses. Today it is a thriving area of the city.

    SINGAPORE RIVER BOAT QUAY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT ANOTHER SEAFOOD RESTAURANT BOAT QUAY

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    Sentosa island

    by boasnovas Written Mar 8, 2015

    Easy to reach by metro, car , even walking, it is possible to spend the day there. The aquarium is good and there are some beaches possible to swim. But on the overwall nothing compared to Florida parks in USA.

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    Sentosa Island

    by shannsow Written Feb 5, 2015

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    Sentosa Island is all way long island , they have different designed for every part of beach. I went to tall view stand crossed bridge ,saw pretty white sand and blue water. Sea available for swimming ,and bath room are ready for use. Go to another beach , we used tram with charge , and the tram stop wont let me wait long hours at stop.

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    S.E.A Aquarium

    by shannsow Written Nov 28, 2014

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    S.E.A Aquarium made me felt like i deep into the sea, with just one big glass can made me face to face with the fish. There one place can let you sit down and enjoy the fish scene, and they broadcast with the perfectly music to made you fantasy.

    Entrance Fee cost SGD38 for adult
    SGD28 for kids

    Time Visit is 10am - 7pm

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    Duck tours

    by PeterVancouver Written Nov 4, 2014

    There is no better way to tour Singapore than catching a ride on the ORIGINAL DUCKtours! Embark on a land and sea adventure on a remodeled WWII amphibious Vietnamese war craft that promises you the best tour experience. This hour-long journey brings you up close to Singapore's famous skyline, historical landmarks and gorgeous bay view.

    Winner of the Tourism Awards Singapore, DUCKtours is rated as one of the Top 10 Best Family Experiences

    Duck passing by the Singapore flyer Duck cruising on the waterway by Fullerton Hotel
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    Singapore Flyer

    by PeterVancouver Updated Oct 3, 2014

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    The Flyer opened in 2008 and during that year had two major shut downs trapping a good number of people for up to seven hours before coming back to earth. Diameter: Singapore Flyer is 150 metres in diameter – Singapore Flyer measures 165 metres in height – considerably larger than the London eye at 135m. Each capsule is 4 metres x 7 metres – about the size of a city bus. There are 28 capsules. Each capsule can carry up to 28 passengers. Speed it travels: 0.24m per second, or 0.76km/h. Total capacity per revolution: 784 passengers. Boarding & Flying Boarding: To board the capsule, you use the “step on platform” – it’s like walking on level ground into the capsule. There are two synchronised doors and two platforms on each side – making it easy for the elderly and those in wheelchairs to get on and off. Rotation: Each rotation is about 32 minutes. Smooth Rotation: Singapore Flyer is designed and built to rotate smoothly under various wind conditions at high altitudes – thanks to precision wind engineering. View Radius: On board Singapore Flyer, you can see up to 45 kilometres away – that’s 3 kilometres more than the entire length of the city. Singapore Flyer uses a slim ladder truss rim – not the usual triangular rim used by other observation wheels.
    Due to financial problems the Flyer was put into receivership in May 2013 but is continuing to run whilst funding is being sorted.
    See more at:

    http://www.singaporeflyer.com/about-us/fun-facts-about-the-flyer/#sthash.zXqbbYwc.dpuf

    Flyer from 23rd floor room of Fairmont Hotel Marina Bay Sands Hotel from the Flyer Financial District & Merlion from Flyer Fairmont Hotel from flyer (white building center)
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    Historic Anderson Bridge

    by PeterVancouver Updated Oct 3, 2014

    The Anderson bridge, which celebrates over a century since being erected in 1909, was named after Sir John Anderson who was the Governor of the Straits Settlements and High Commissioner for the Federated Malay States from 1904–1911. Most young Singaporeans would know it better for being part of the Singapore Grand Prix's Marina Bay street circuit.

    Unlike any other bridge in Singapore, the Anderson bridge is made up of intricate plaster and metalwork with rusticated archways and a fluted pier at each end.

    However, beneath its elegance lies a rather Inglorious past. During WWII and the Occupation by the Japanese, they displayed heads of beheaded spies, on the steel columns of the Bridge as a warning to discourage citizens from following the same path.

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    Take a train ride to Bangkok from Singapore

    by PeterVancouver Updated Oct 3, 2014

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    I don't know what it is about train journeys, but perhaps its spending most of my life living in the UK, where you are never far away from the railway track, or perhaps I am now ancient enough to recall with nostalgia, the passenger steam engines that would carry us up to London, and the fast freight trains, that would roar through stations at speed in a cloud of smoke and steam, over the years I was growing up in England.

    We have been on a number of interesting rail trips overseas in the past few years, including a five night VIA rail journey across Canada from the Maritimes to our current home over the Rockies in Vancouver, or a two day Churchill to Winnipeg trip in the snow and -40C freezing conditions after Polar Bear watching in the Arctic where the locomotives had to run, even when not in use, to prevent the lubrication and fuel from freezing.

    In warmer climates, overnight sleepers in Australia and a full western seaboard rail month long journey of India from Agra in the North, to Kovalam down South, stopping off at interesting places on route .

    It therefore became clear to us that before we fall off the perch, that we should do something that friends had suggested was maybe the ultimate in rail travel, by going on the E & O out of Singapore to Bangkok via the River Kwai.

    Space is somewhat at a premium even in the State Rooms, so really it is wise to only take the type of luggage you would onto an aircraft cabin, and have the larger cases stowed away in the baggage car which would not be available until journey's end.

    After checking in at Raffles in the anti room of the Long Bar, the Eastern & Orient Express train leaves Singapore at around 16.00 hrs and arrives in Kuala Lumpur at 23.15. From there it continues up the Malaysian Peninsular through the night to Butterworth Station for a motorcoach and ferry excursion to Penang at 08.45 the second day, and leaves Butterworth at 11.30. During the early hours of the third day it crosses over into Thailand at Padang Besar and continues up the line to Hua Hin. Further up the line the train is stopped and an additional loco is fitted to the end of the train, behind the observation car to pull the train, complete with the original loco, up to Kanachanaburi and the Kwai Bridge arriving at 10.45.The final leg of the trip is leaving Kanachanaburi at 12.15 which generally gives an arrival in Bangkok Station at 16.45

    It is a trip of a lifetime and is hugely expensive at around $8,000 per couple for a Stateroom for the two nights/three days. The Train manager asked us back in Singapore, what made us make this journey which we answered in two parts, one being it was the same track my Uncle in the UK Army had been on from Changi after the fall of Singapore in 42, on his way to the Thai-Burma Death Railway. The second part of the answer was that a week previously, we had just celebrated our 40th Wedding anniversary.

    The trip was fine but In my mind having us spend this sort of money on their train, it would not have really dented their profits too much to have maybe provided a bottle of sparking wine in the State Room for our arrival on board as a welcome or maybe offered a glass at some stage during mealtimes or perhaps in the bar in the evening, during the journey. Instead we received nothing more than a somewhat hurried "bon appetite" to all guests each meal time from the Restaurant Manager.

    We have taken a number of Cunard voyages and transatlantic crossings over the past few years and without fail there was a minimum of a bottle of bubbly in the cabin upon arrival, and often a number of other "welcome" goodies, and this being at less than half the price we paid on this two night rail trip. These are not expensive for the carrier in the overall scheme of things, but certainly I would suggest that this does make the customer feel that at least there is some form of personal attention being paid.

    I made these comments to the E & O US office, as whilst living in the UK, we were told by friends that some years ago they had travelled on this train on a very special occasion, and that the Managers at that time, were certainly not slow in offering them the odd complimentary drink during the trip. It could of course be that the new owners "Belmond", feel that margins have to be improved at the expense of the customer.

    To me the above has come across slightly as penny pinching on what otherwise would have been a great trip but which could have certainly been improved by a number of other small issues that in my opinion, could have been thought through collectively by the Organisation .

    I give it 8 out of 10, but upon reflection, for the money involved and a little more attention to detail, it could and should, have been 10/10

    Eastern & Orient crossing the Kwai bridge Itinerary, June 14 E & Orient Express to Bangkok Open observation car Cars originally made in Japan for the NZ railway State Room E & O
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    Marina Bay Sands SkyPark, Observation Deck

    by jumpingnorman Written Aug 23, 2014

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    We brought our JumpingTwins in 2014 to Singapore to enjoy the amazing view from the observation deck of the Manila bay Sands :) Even if you are not checked-in at the hotel, there is an area available for enjoying the top of this amazing architecture. Truly not to be missed when in Singapore. I am just including in this tip our latest pics from the viewing deck.

    S$23 for adults
    S$17 for children (aged between 2 - 12 years*)
    S$20 for senior citizens (aged 65 years and above)

    Children under 2 years may enter for free.

    Tickets can be purchased for a specific date up to one month in advance.
    Same-day admission tickets can only be purchased at Marina Bay Sands Box Offices.
    Please note that a condition of sale is there are no exchanges or refunds once the purchase has been made.
    Where to buy:

    Marina Bay Sands website

    Ticketing Hotline: +65 6688 8826
    Marina Bay Sands Box Offices
    ArtScience Museum Lobby
    Concierge Desk, Hotel Lobby Tower 1
    Retail Concierge, The Shoppes L1
    SkyPark Ticketing Counter, Tower 3 B1
    Theatres, The Shoppes B1

    JumpingTwins in Singapore 2014 JumpingFamily at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore Jumpingwife and daughter enjoying the SkyPark, SG

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    Chinese New Year Celebrations

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Aug 21, 2014

    I happened to be in Singapore during the celerbations of the Chinese New Year 1983, the Year of the Pig, and it was an amazing show that I will never forget. I have not seen this celebration in Taipei or Shanghai, but the one in Singapore was extraordinary. Every day I assisted to the shows. Everybody participates, even Indians and Malay.
    So, try to be in Singapore during the New Year celebrations.

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    Singapore cricket Club

    by PeterVancouver Updated Jul 21, 2014

    The only way you can enter this building would be as a guest of a member or applying for membership assuming you are a Singaporean resident. Established in 1852, the Singapore Cricket Club is today a premier sports and social club in Asia. It is the second oldest sports club in Singapore, junior by 10 years to the Singapore Sporting Club, now the Singapore Turf Club. The Club stands at the centre of the city’s colonial heart, a public space that has witnessed many of Singapore’s triumphs and defeats, upheavals, independence and, finally, the annual National Day Parades on 9 August. Nearby historic buildings include Raffles Hotel, St Andrew’s Cathedral, City Hall (on the steps of which the Japanese surrendered to the British in 1945), the Old Supreme Court (to re-open with City Hall as the National Art Gallery of Singapore in 2014), Old Parliament House (now the Arts House), Victoria Theatre and Memorial Hall, and Empress Place Building (formerly government offices and now the Asian Civilisations Museum). Cricket was played on the Padang as early as 1837, only 18 years after Sir Stamford Raffles founded the settlement of Singapore in 1819, but it was not until 1852 that the first meetings were called to discuss the formal establishment of a cricket club. There have been no fewer than three clubhouse buildings on the Padang, the first erected some time in the 1860s, the second in 1877. The third pavilion, which forms the core of the present clubhouse building, was built in 1884. It was extended in 1907, and the northern and southern wings that we see today were added in 1922.

    Overlooking grounds and pavillion of the SCC Impressive portal for the SCC
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