Suwon Things to Do

  • Hwaseong Fortress Wall
    Hwaseong Fortress Wall
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  • Paldalmun
    Paldalmun
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Most Recent Things to Do in Suwon

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    Seobuk Gangno

    by iwys Written Feb 14, 2006

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    Seobuk Gangno, the Northwest Angle Tower, stands above the Hwaseomun Gate. It was used as a watchtower and the first story of the two-storey tower has ondol, underfloor heating, so the off-duty troops could sleep there in winter.

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    Seonodae

    by iwys Written Feb 14, 2006

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    Seonodae, the West Multiple-Arrow-Launcher platform, is an impressive, octagonal, brick tower, which was used as a watchtower and also, as it name suggests, to enable multiple weaponry to be brought to bear on the enemy below.

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    The Bell of Hyowon

    by iwys Updated Feb 14, 2006

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    The great Bell of Hyoweon was made in 1991 as a symbol of the city to replace the old bronze bell of Pladalmun gate, which was so badly cracked and damaged that it could no longer be rung. The bell is 3.5 m high and 2.5 m in diameter.

    You must pay 1,000 won at the kiosk next to it, if you wish to ring the bell. You are then entitled to three rings and three wishes. At the first ring you should wish for your parents' health, the second for your children and other family members' health and the third for your own.

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    The bastions

    by iwys Written Feb 14, 2006

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    Hwaseong Fortress has ten bastions, or chi, protruding out from the wall to help defenders repel enemy troops approaching from the left and right sides, as well as for regular frontal attacks. They also served as watchtowers. They are massive structures with parapets and gun embrasures.

    The one in the photo is Seosam chi, the West Third Bastion.

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  • Suwon City Tour

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    The city authorities operate a coach tour around the main sites twice saily at 10am and 2pm, starting and ending at Suwon Station. It runs past the northern part of the fortress wall, the World Cup stadium and the Korean Broadcasting Station centre. The tour stops at several points for a short tour.
    A slower street-train also operates around the fortress area on a hop-on/hop-off basis during the day.
    Price W5000ad/3000st/2000ch

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  • Seonamgangnu

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    A 100 metre stretch of the wall protrudes along to the far end of the ridge, providing views for a considerable distance, and so protecting the main Padalmun below. Given its exposed position, this stretch is wide and particularly high. Watching over Suwon from Seonamgangnu at sunset is especially memorable.

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  • Seo-Poru

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    Seo-Poru is the major fort on the ridge, jutting out 7 metres from the wall to protect along it. It is, like others, multi-storied and easily defendable.
    Just to the south is a lane down the slope, forming a short-cut back to Suwon Station.

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  • Seojangdae

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    Just a few metres behind the Seonodae observation platform is the Seojangdae, the tall and elegant military command post, from where the military defence would have been directed in times of siege or attack.

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  • Seonodae

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    Seonodae is a unique structure, an octagonal platform high above the ground and used for communicating with the other forts around the walls, using coloured flags. It was also used as a launch pad for catapults hurling objects towards attackers.

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  • Hwaseomun

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    The west gate, with the Seobukgongsimdon, is different from the Padalmun and Janganmun, with a curved protective front wall to prevent any force directly rushing the gate. This was considered necessary as this gate was not so easy to defend as effectively as other gates.

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  • Seobukgongsimdon

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    The north-east observation tower is a huge, three –storied structure, with each floor reachable by ladders. Gun holes allowed soldiers to defend both the Janganmun and the Hwaseomun nearby. The outline, with the graceful roof and slightly inclined walls, forms the archetypal Korean military building.

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  • Buk-Poru

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    The wall climbs gradually up the northern side of the ridge, with small pavilions and then the Buk-Poru, another large defensive fort set in the wall to support the bigger gateways. No effort was spared to provide full defensive support in the Suwon fortress, each part backed up by another place.

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  • Janganmun

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    The huge north gate is the impressively elegant Janganmun, blocking the way into the city. Its curved front wall protects the main gateway. In times of war, movements could be carefull controlled so that soliders could carefully check those entering the fortress from the wall above. The higher central part overlooks the arched front and the foreground, so providing additional protection. To right and left, small bastions provide additional covering support.
    Today, the roadway pierces the wall either side, but originally, there would have been absolutely no way through without the soldiers allowing it.
    It is worth leaving the wall here and walking outside to admire the fortifications as they stretch away in either direction. Try imagining the surroundings without the tall modern buildings and the mmodern wide roads – it must have been an awe-inspiring sight, which was the intention.
    There is a Tourist Information Centre across the road from the gate.

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  • Bukdong-Poru

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    Just pass the Hwahongmun, and standing proud of the wall to defend the water-gate is the Bukdong-Poru, a particularly strongly fortified position.
    It has a beautiful hipped roof at the outer face, and a gable roof on the fortress side. It looks out along the entire northern face of the fortress.

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  • Hwahongmun

    by mke1963 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    One of the best known sites at Suwon is the single remaining river gate at Hwahongmun. It’s opposite number, downstream, was washed away during a flood, and that section of the wall has now disappeared entirely.
    At Hwahongmun, the wall crosses the stream bed on seven arches, with a defensive pavilion sitting astride the top.

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Suwon Things to Do

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