Busan Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by globetrott
  • Local Customs
    by globetrott
  • Local Customs
    by globetrott

Best Rated Local Customs in Busan

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    Couple Clones...

    by amambaw Written Jun 20, 2004

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    A current trend in Korea is for couples to dress alike. I have seen varying degrees of this, from couples wearing the same shirt to couples with complete matching outfits (probably undies too!). If you are one of a twosome, and you would like to try this one out, be forewarned: you may be the object of a few stares!

    I love the space pants...

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    Another interesting couple custom

    by amambaw Written Jun 21, 2004

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    In Korea, it is customary for the man in the relationship to hold the woman's purse when they are out shopping. It took me awhile to adjust to seeing men carrying around faux-fur pink purses, but I'm getting better: I manage to not glance for more than a few moments!

    Aww, isn't that cute?

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    Churches everywhere

    by SLLiew Written Sep 28, 2006

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    Was surprised to see so many churches on the way to Busan from Seoul. Christianity is the other major religion besides Confucianism and Buddhism. What is interesting is that the crosses on the churches are lighted up.

    Then I remember about the famous "Moonies" sect in USA which originate from South Korea. I In Malaysia, even some non-Christians have adopted Christian names like Michael Ooi or Angeline Tan. Did not meet anyone who introduced themselves as Michael Kim or Angeline Park.

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    Stainless Steel eating utensils

    by SLLiew Written Sep 28, 2006

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    In Busan and all over South Korea, when you eat your rice, it comes in a stainless steel bowl with stainless steel chopsticks.

    Our guess is that it is for hygiene purpose and for environmental protection of felling trees to make disposable chopsticks. It gives a unique steel taste. I would prefer wood or plastic chopstick anytime but in Rome, do as the Romans do.

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    Koreans and their English

    by amambaw Written Aug 8, 2004

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    A lot of Koreans have a difficult time with some letters in the English language, as they don't have anything that really corresponds in Hangul. Some of the more common problems occur when dealing with the letter l, the letter r, and the letter z, although I'm sure there are others that I am missing.

    The result of these mix-ups is that you will find many such signs as you see to the left!

    When dealing with Koreans, don't be afraid to correct their English, as long as you do it in a polite way. Many of them will appreciate the correction!

    Hmmmmm...

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    foodstands in the streets

    by globetrott Written Aug 5, 2014

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    Close to the famous fishmarkets you will find a whole street with markets and various foodstands. You will see a lot of local people there and I found it very interesting to see what kind of food was offered there. At the end I did not dare to taste anything, but lots of dishes looked really great !

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    • Food and Dining
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    Cable-Salad á la Busan

    by globetrott Written Aug 4, 2014

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    Watch out for the funny Electro-Cables-Salad when you walk through Busan. You will find such a cable-salad in lots of remote places in Asia, but I did not think I would find that in a mostly quite modern city like Busan. Most of my photos were take in the sidestreets, but one of them also in the centre of town...

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    PIFF - the Pusan International Film Festival

    by globetrott Updated Aug 5, 2014

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    PIFF is the abbreviation for the Pusan International Film Festival, the largest filmfestival of Asia and it is an annual event around October.
    The festival started in 1996 and the motto of the festival is „The World’s Most Energetic Film Festival.“ More than 300 films from 37 countries are shown there The main prize is the "New Currents Award" for asian directors only.
    The main building used for the BIFF is the Busan Cinema Center, a building built in 2005 by austrian architects of "Coop Himmelblau"
    Read more about the festival on the webpage of the BIFF, there is a link below.
    b.t.w.: in some places the Festival is also called BIFF, when Pusan is called Busan in some countries, both spellings are obviously used and both seem to be correct
    In Korea they use PIFF, as you can see in my Pictures, but the official Webpage uses BIFF.kr...
    On VT they call the 2nd largest City of Korea Busan, while Pusan is a much smaller town in another part of the Country and listed on VT as well.

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    Pusan or Busan

    by globetrott Updated Aug 5, 2014

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    Pusan or Busan

    Pusan or Busan, both of these names are possible and official names for the same city, that is the 2nd largest city of South-Korea with around 3.600.000 inhabitants.
    And Wikipedia even offers a third official spelling, that seems to be totally outdated nowadays: Fusan
    What I found quite confusing about Busan and/or Pusan is the fact that all over the city you read about the PIFF, the Pusan International Film Festival and when you go to their official webpage, you read there : www.biff.kr

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    lovely benches & more

    by globetrott Written Aug 5, 2014

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    In the park around the Busan Tower I saw these lovely benches: 2 dolphins are holding the seats, what a funny idea.
    In my 2nd Picture: some decorations in a facade
    my 3rd Picture: even the car-licenceplates look interesting
    my 4th Picture: a bridge with a swing

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    inscriptions

    by globetrott Updated Aug 3, 2014

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    Local inscriptions are mostly just made in chinese letters and only in some places like the Metro you will see inscription in latin letters as well. In some cases you can guess anyway, but especially when it comes to traficsigns with some extra explanations you will have no chance at all, so be prepared !

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  • amambaw's Profile Photo

    Small dogs everywhere

    by amambaw Written Aug 1, 2004

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    I'm not sure exactly how this will benefit anyone travelling to S. Korea, but I think it's interesting, and may help you to psychologically prepare for this strange and wonderful place.

    People here have a very different view on pets. Most families don't name their pets, even dogs and cats. I don't think that they get as attached to the animal members of their families as Westerners do (this could just be my own perception, based on what I've talked about with some Koreans).

    I think the most interesting thing I've seen so far is that most of the pets in Busan are dogs, and most of these dogs are small. And occasionally colored weird colors. Please don't ask why, I have yet to understand it myself!

    Nice tail...

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    Respect your elders.

    by Travel2write Written Jun 8, 2005

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    Out of respect for the elderly, young people usually give up their seats for an aged person on a crowded bus or subway train. Nowadays some young people do not but most still do. Most Koreans wouldn't expect a foreigner to do this, but if you do it will make you look like a well-mannered guest in their country.

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    Chopsticks

    by Travel2write Written Jun 8, 2005

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    During the meal, rest your chopsticks and spoon on top of a dish. When you have finished eating, lay the chopsticks or spoon on the table to indicate that you have completed the meal. Never stick chopsticks or spoons in a bowl of rice - this is done only during ancestral memorial services. Don't worry about reaching in front of others or asking for a dish to be passed.

    Related to:
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Disabilities
    • Singles

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    Shoes and Heads

    by LaLaInTheWaynePlane Written Jul 28, 2004

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    Give a little nod of your head when you say hello and goodbye...if it's someone important make a bigger nod/bow.

    Shoes...look at other people...did they take their shoes off and put on slippers??? then YOU should too.

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Busan Local Customs

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