Other Stuff, Seoul

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  • Other Stuff
    by Ewingjr98
  • Other Stuff
    by Ewingjr98
  • Other Stuff
    by Ewingjr98
  • suderman's Profile Photo

    Things to take back from Seoul!

    by suderman Written Aug 12, 2005
    Gyongbok palace

    Favorite thing: The Walker Hill show! Great food, awesome music, mindblowing choreography. The best blend of local traditions and contemporary global culture.
    Super romantic place to take your date.

    Fondest memory: Live jazz music at Once in a Blue Moon!!
    And of course, the Saturday nightlife in Itaewon!
    And DVD shopping at the Electronics market!
    For more about our adventures in Seoul, read this:
    http://sudhishkamath.blogspot.com/2005/05/wanted-comments.html

    :)

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Singles

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  • olddude's Profile Photo

    Wired!

    by olddude Written Aug 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of my favorite things about Seoul is internet access. It is everywhere. Korea is one of the most wired places in the world and Seoul has got to be the most wired city. There are "hotspots" everywhere and if you don't own a computer, you can go to any of the thousands of PC rooms (PC bong) and use one of their computers to access the internet or play your favorite video game for as little as $1 US per hour. Also many of the PC rooms offer sandwiches and beverages for a nominal fee while you use their equipment. If you are into computers this is the place to be.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel

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  • i-s-a's Profile Photo

    Taste the Local Flavor - Spicy Rice Cake

    by i-s-a Updated May 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oh those yummy Korean street food.

    Fondest memory: One look at these street special and I said to myself "I want those yummy-looking sausages with tomato sauce"...so a friend bought me a serving. Imagine my surprise when I learned that those were not sausages…and definitely not tomato sauce! Those were rice cakes with chili sauce… sooooooo spicy!

    Try it while in Seoul (or maybe in any part of Korea...I'm not sure)...you'll be craving for it once you went home to your country.

    Be sure to have water at hand...the cakes are so spicy and it would surely bring tears to your eyes.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel
    • Food and Dining

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  • i-s-a's Profile Photo

    Taste the Local Flavor - Bibimbap

    by i-s-a Updated May 8, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bibimbap

    Favorite thing: When I wrote the outline for my Korean Journal, I noticed that 2 words dominate the pages...delicious and yummy ;0) Guess that explains how much I love Korean food.

    A friend let me try Bibimbap in one of Insadong's cozy restaurants (unfortunately, I forgot the name of the shop). It is rice with lots of toppings like veggies, pork and noodles. According to him bibim means "mix" and bap means "rice". You need to put some chili paste to complete the mixture. It didn't look appealing at first (imagine kaning baboy!) but it is delicious. I love how the different textures compliment each other. And I love the chili paste though not too much because I couldn't tolerate its spiciness. With it, several complimentary side dishes were served; there is something that looked like "dilis" in spicy chili sauce, monggo sprout, radish, and the traditional cabbage Kimchi.

    Fondest memory: I'm not sure if it's called Mak geol li....a kind local rice wine. It is milky white in color and served warm. It is very light and not as intoxicating as Soju. For a non-drinker, I can say this wine is very nice and has a delicate flavor. Very good partner for those hot chili paste.

    Word of advice:
    Eat with a friend and share. Koreans serve big servings of everything! Look at how big the bowl of Bibimbap was. My friends got bored waiting for me to finish it all up ;0)

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • i-s-a's Profile Photo

    When in doubt, ask.

    by i-s-a Written Apr 28, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    gift from an angel

    Fondest memory: Before going to Korea, I have made quite a detailed plan; where to go, what to do, what to eat, where to shop, what to bring and all the essentials. But I have found out that the best suggestions and informations come from the locals and from the visitors who have done the same trip as you are.

    The picture shows the little note on how to get to the Seoul Bus Station. A Japanese lady offered me this when she found out that I wanted to go to Gyeongju alone. It saved me a lot of time, effort and anxiety in going there. And best of all, I made a new friend!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

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  • seoulgirl's Profile Photo

    Mosquitos

    by seoulgirl Written Mar 7, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are alot of mosquitos from spring until winter. They are sneaky little #$&$%#'s. You can buy a plastic device with liquid that plugs into your wall to kill them automatically. There is also mosquito spray but you have to spray them directly and if you are sleeping that isn't possible. They will haunt you all night.

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  • jburron's Profile Photo

    Rent a Phone to Make Life Easier

    by jburron Updated Jan 4, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here's a pic of my lovely Samsung phone.

    Favorite thing: Although there are payphones in every subway station and all taxi-drivers have one (or two), if you're in Seoul for business or extended for pleasure (and/or plan on going outside of the city) renting a cellphone/mobile at the (Incheon) Airport can be a good idea.

    The reasons are many:
    (i) Absoutely everyone has a phone and everyone uses textmessaging too (it's more convenient than talking sometimes and Koreans can read/write English better than they can speak it in many cases);
    (ii) Plans can change at any time and traffic can be a bother so you may need to get in touch with people or them with you;
    (iii) Directions in Seoul can be a challenge and you may even need to call someone who is a few feet away because of the crowds, and;
    (iv) It's just more convenient for you (and, more importantly, the people you may meet there) to be in constant communication.

    Also, please know that Korea has its own special frequency (CDMA 2000) that is wholly different from all the others...even 3G phones and devices will not get a signal here: only Korean-band ones.

    Prices are about 3,000 won/2.7USD a day plus 600 won/0.50USD a minute. Big carriers are LG, KT and SK (going from cheapest to most expensive, no real difference in service, but phones offered may vary).

    Fondest memory: Click here for more phone information; but, contrary to its advice, you need not reserve a phone beforehand.

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  • jburron's Profile Photo

    Charge Your Phone Anywhere (Almost)

    by jburron Updated Dec 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    They look like this in MMC Theatre in Dongdaemoon.

    Favorite thing: If you rent a phone while in Seoul/Korea (I have a tip on this also) you may find yourself with a run-down battery from time to time (even though the batteries in them are usually quite good). If you do there is an answer.

    At many CVSs (Korean name for ConVenience Stores) and some restaurants and theatres there are chargers. A quick-charge (abotu 5-10 minutes, I believe) costs about 1,000won/1USD in a CVS but might be by 'donation' or free in a restaurant or theatre.

    The Korean word for them is 핸드폰 충전기 (said as hand-fone choong-jeung-gi) so you can either ask around or do a little mime thing of holding your phone to your ear and acting as if it doesn't work to get someone to point you toward one.

    More here.

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Nasi Goreng Pedas: Korean version!!!

    by emilytyc Updated Nov 15, 2004
    Jacky... Peter... and Nasi Goreng Pedas!

    Favorite thing: My 2 korean friends, Jacky and Peter wanted us to try the Korean version of Nasi Goreng Pedas (Malaysian spicy fried rice).

    I am quite sorry that I did not take the picture before eating, but we were TOO hungry!!! It is very yummy.... and spicy!!!

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Korean Side Dishes

    by emilytyc Written Nov 15, 2004
    Part of the side dishes only...

    Favorite thing: This is a WOW! I still remembered, when I first went into a Korean restaurant, I was amazed at the amount of side dishes served! It could be between 8 to 20 side dishes depending on the restaurant.

    These are actually cold dishes and most of it features the famous Kimchi!! You can see kimchi in the picture. Kimchi is actually spicy pickled cabbage, they are all red in colour.

    You know what is the best thing?? ALL of these side dishes are FREE! Cooool....

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Food for picnic: Kim Pap

    by emilytyc Written Nov 15, 2004
    Kim Pap... yummy!

    Favorite thing: When my host mother brought us to DMZ, she packed Kim Pap as our picnic food. I thought it looked really like the japanese sushi but it is actually bigger and more tasty.

    One roll of Kim Pap is enough to fill my tummy!!

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Food: Bibimbab

    by emilytyc Written Nov 15, 2004
    Bibimbab: Before mixing...

    Favorite thing: This is also a popular dish... I love the taste. You have rice, meat, vegetables and paste served on a HOT claypot. Once the dish is served, use your utensils, and MIX everything together. You will hear sizzling sounds as you mix! ;o)

    Enjoy!

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Food: Bulgogi

    by emilytyc Updated Nov 15, 2004
    Dan Xia... look at this Bulgogi!

    Favorite thing: If you are in S. Korea, you have to try this signature dish! Its very tasty and all foreigners love it...

    Bulgogi is as typical as Kimchi when you mention Korean food. It is BBQ marinated beef, sliced thinly to obtain the sweet, juicy taste and it goes with sticky rice.

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  • K1W1's Profile Photo

    Slippery chopsticks

    by K1W1 Written Oct 13, 2004

    Favorite thing: This is a trap for young players - after getting along just fine with my chopstick skills in China and Sth East Asia, I quickly became unstuck in Korea. Here, for some reason they like to use metal chopsticks as opposed to the normal wooden or plastic versions. I found the metal to be very slippery and it was like I had to learn all over again - frustrating, but it gave my local friends a good laugh.

    Fondest memory: If you get the opportunity to go out with some local friends - jump on it. The Seoul that the locals know and love is likely to be much different than the city you're likely to see with a guidebook. There are some great places to eat, drink and be merry, and the Koreans would have to be among the genuinely friendliest in Asia.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Seoul Has a Surprising Number of Churches

    by AKtravelers Written Sep 18, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A church tops a hill near Itaewon

    Favorite thing: One of the more surprising aspects of Seoul is the number of Christian churches, often located in prominent places. With the exception of the Philippines, there are more Christians in South Korea than any other East Asian nation. I believe about 20% of the Korean population claims to belong to one of the Christian religions.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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