Eating & Drinking, Seoul

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  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Cass Light Beer

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 19, 2008

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    Cass Light!
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    Popular Beer in South Korea, this is Ice Filtered and has 1/3 less calories than Cass Beer and has 4.2% alcohol content and is again available everywhere and the price is 700 won for 500 ml bottle and 2,500 won for a 1.5 liter bottle.

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    OB Lager Beer

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 19, 2008

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    OB Blue is Strong!
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    Another Popular South Korean beer and again Brewed by the Oriental brewery, it is a Pale Lager that has 4.5% alchohol content and adds rice to the brew. Again this is available everywhere and the price is 800 won for a 700 ml bottle.

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    Hite Beer

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 19, 2008

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    Has A Stronger Kick Than Cass Fresh
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    Another Famous South Korean Beer that is brewed by the Hite Brewery. Hite lager is golden in colour and is styled upon traditional European and American lagers; it has 4.5% alcohol Hite is a micro filtered lager that has a stronger kick than Cass. a 700 ml bottle is 800 won and is available everywhere.

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    Cass Fresh Beer

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 19, 2008

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    Cass Fresh beer
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    Famous Lager Beer in South Korea. Cass is a 5.0% larger which is one of the 3 most popular beers in Korea. Sold bottled or on tap in Korea its a fairly pale larger reminiscent of many an Asian pale larger. It is produced by oriental brewery and the 500 ml bottle is about 700 won and is available everywhere.

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    Assorted Korean Bar Chow!

    by machomikemd Written Jun 25, 2008

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    cheap bar chow!
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    well if your room has a kitchen and you plan to have a drink, these are perfect bar chow companions that you can buy at 24 hour convenience stores like in 7-11 and then cook it and save about 75% of the costs of drinking at bars and hofs and they are aslo cheap. the crab imitation stick is about 2,000 won, the korean ham is about 1,800 won and the korean chicken burger squares are about 2000 won.

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    Kimchi Galore!

    by machomikemd Updated Jun 24, 2008

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    Assorted Kimchi with the Pork Galbi!
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    there are about 35 basic kinds of kimchi in both south and north korea and kimchi is spicier in north korea since they have colder weather. At present there are about 100 different variations of kimchi. If you eat at a korean restaurant here, they will give you at least 4 kind of ban chan (kimchi) as side dish and as many as 13 in large restaurants and the good news, kimchi is given free when you order food at any restaurants, food courts, fast food places around south korea.

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    Korean Style Tonkatsu

    by machomikemd Written Jun 23, 2008

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    Less Sweet Sauce than Japanese Tonkatsu
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    Korean Version of the popular Japanese Tonkatsu (deep fried breaded pork with sweet sauce) the difference is that the sauce is less sweet than the japanese version. It costs 4,500 won plain and 6,000 won if with a set (soup, rice, kimchi, drink)

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    Korean Food (my opinion)

    by victorwkf Written Dec 22, 2007

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    Korean food, Seoul, South Korea
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    After I have been to Seoul three times (and perhaps one more time in year 2008), my opinion of Korean food are as follows:

    - Meat is an important component of Korean food e.g. pork, squid, fish etc. Also, Korean love their food to be spicy and hot. Herbs such as ginseng are also popularly added into food.
    - For a typical meal, there are lots of side dishes (usually Kimchi and other vegetables). Sometimes it is very difficult to finish all the food because there is simply too much to eat.
    - Unlike Japanese food (e.g. sushi), Korean food is usually cooked so there is less of a problem with raw food. Also, the hygiene standard is generally high. The hot Korean food is very good on a cold day e.g. winter.
    - As for variety, I think Korean food does not have so much variety as compared to Chinese food or Japanese food.

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    Make your own Korean food...

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 15, 2007

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    Kalbi marinade and roasted hot pepper paste
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    I love to make Kalbi (even now that I'm back in the US). The right cuts of Kalbi meat are sometimes hard to find...in English, look for beef chuck short ribs. It seems that all Korean groceries in Korea and the US sell this cut, but big American grocery stores rarely have it except in areas with large Korean populations. Sometimes you will find the meat thin cut with 3 thin ribs, but to make kalbi like Koreans make it, you'll need the kind cut into a roughly 1" x 2" x 2" cube with one thick rib. Cut it from the edges into an S-shape from the top so it stretches into one long, thin piece (see picture).

    Kalbi marinade is sold at most Korean grocery stores as well. Just soak the thawed ribs in this sauce for 4 hours or longer, or make your own marinade from soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, corn oil, garlic and onion.

    The best condiment is the roasted hot pepper paste (called go chu jang) that is spicy but flavorful, and is also frequently used in bibimbap and dolsot bibimbap. Many people call this spicy bean paste, and it does contain soy beans, but it's mostly red peppers and glutinous rice.

    Serve the kalbi on romaine lettuce, with fried sliced garlic, sticky rice (in the US buy Calrose Rice), and maybe some fried mushrooms.

    Popular side dishes with this meal include kimchi, spinach seasoned with sesame oil, seasoned soybean sprouts, and sliced pickled radish.

    I often serve mandu as an appetizer with rice cakes as a desert.

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    Rice Cake Candy

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 15, 2007

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    Korean rice cakes

    A Korean food custom is rice cake candy. This is popular at festivals and, for some reason, in subway stations. This candy is made by beating the snot (or as Koreans say: nose water) out of rice until it becomes sticky and chewy. It doesn't have much taste until the balls of rice candy are coated with cinnamon, sesame seeds, or other tasty items. The rice candy is often filled with sweet red mung bean paste which sounds disgusting, but actually tastes pretty good.

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    It's a dog-eat-dog world

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 26, 2007

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    Korean dog farm north of Incheon

    Do Koreans really eat dog meat? You bet they do... it's called Kaegogi, literally "fire dog." It's really a summer-time delicacy (for the "dog days" of summer!).

    Koreans are very sensitive to the Western belief that dog should not be eaten, therefore, they will rarely talk about eating dog, will seldom eat it in front of a Westerner, and would never serve dog without telling their guests. Unlike most other Korean stores and restaurants, Kaegogi restaurants never have signs in English, as they are not for tourists. If you want to try dog, you'll have to learn Hangul or make friends with a local. My friends who tried it say it tastes like a wet dog smells...

    According to this BBC article (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/422338.stm) dog is the fourth most popular meat in Korea after pork, beef, and chicken. Eating dog was banned for several years around the '88 Olympics and '02 World Cup, partly due to the inhumane killing methods, but the practice has continued. Some argue that the practice should be stopped due to the infamous cruelty, while others argue eating dog is part f the Korean culture and therefore should be allowed, but regulated to prevent abuse and punish those who might torture the animals.

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    Eating in Korean Restaurants

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 8, 2007

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    Eating and drinking with Koreans is one of the things that is most common and most difficult to get used to. At a traditional Korean restaurant, you will leave your shoes at the door and sit on a small mat on the floor next to a table that is only about 1 foot off the ground. Koreans always pour drinks for others at the table, but never for themselves. Money talks, and the older person almost always gets the bill. They don't split the cost and pass money around the table like most Americans! Unlike some other Asian countries, Koreans usually don't pick up soup bowls to drink the broth, instead they use metal spoons.

    Western restaurants almost always serve meals in the Western style, with regular tables and chairs along with silverware. Even some of the more casual Korean restaurants use the Western style nowadays.

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    Foodstands

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    There are many foodstands all through Seoul. The serve really good snacks and sometimes Koreans are willing to wait for ages if they know the serving is good. If you are a bit hungry, these are great possibilities to try out some Korean food and it's ridiculously cheap. Usually just 500W (no negotiating).

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    Ginseng

    by yellowbell Updated Mar 18, 2007

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    Chicken Ginseng Soup

    If a visit to China is not complete without drinking tea, a visit to Korea is not complete without having a taste of ginseng. We went to this ginseng factory where this venerable root was sold as tea, as beauty powder, and mixed in soup.

    I have tasted this ginseng chicken soup with the chicken so tender, it easily breaks apart, so you can eat the sticky rice inside. I love it because it's not spicy!

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    Do you know how to eat korean food?

    by mccrorj Updated Aug 13, 2006

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    I flew into seoul from london on a Korea airlines 747 and was asked by the attendant whether I wanted european or korean food. I'm flying to korea and therefore I chose the local dish which was bi bi bap which is a rice dish. On delivering the dish she asked me "do you know how to eat this?" Being a portly chap I thought she was making a joke and just laughed and said yes. I then proceeded to eat each dish on the tray, a practise I continued for the next five days. On my flight out of korea I was offered the same choice and again chose the korean dish. Being an expert by this point I set about eating the meal to the shock of my Korean neighbour who showed me, like a child, how to eat my dinner appropriately. The trick is to mix everything to your preference into the main bowl, add veg, rice and the soup/gravy and then eat all together. Clearly I didn't know how to eat my dinner, I do now. Pleace learn from my ignorance. To be honest I don't think the locals are actually that bothered but boy did I feel foolish when realised my mistake.

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