Eating & Drinking, Seoul

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  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • Eating & Drinking
    by Ewingjr98
  • newsphotogirl's Profile Photo

    Coffee To Go

    by newsphotogirl Updated May 23, 2006

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    My local substitute

    There was a small store around the corner from my hotel that sold mini cans of coffee and lattes. I don't know why but I loooooved them. I guess I'm easy to please. I would walk by on the way to the subway and pick up a couple. One day the owner pointed toward what looked like a small oven. I couldn't figure out what he was trying to say so I just shrugged. Finally he walked over, opened it up, grabbed something inside and put it in my hand. Warm cans of coffee!!

    Actually a lot of places in Korea sell these. I recently found a Korean grocery store close to home in the U.S. that sells them.

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    Makeshift Restaurants

    by yellowbell Updated May 17, 2006

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    Itaewon's Makeshift Restaurant

    Try eating in any of the makeshift restaurants in Itaewon - there's a wide cuisine to choose from. The makeshift restaurants are usually white tents and inside there are plastic stools and tables.

    Street food is everywhere and most notably found in the alleys of Namdaemun and Myeongdong. Korea's open-air markets are litter-free so I was encourged to try the tempura like food and put some mustard (didn't realize that was spicy !) Water please! No wonder they wash down everything with Soju.

    There were also pork and chicken in barbecue sticks. I was not courageous enough to try that sausage like thing immersed in dark orange sauce boiling hot in cauldrons, it might be the pig's intestine they were talking about!

    Apart from the makeshift restaurants, there are also Western bars and restos in Itaewon (this is their tourist area).

    Direction:
    Itaewon Subway Station

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    Kimchi Making

    by snuggie Written Apr 24, 2006
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    Kimchi is a must have dish in korean meals and kimchi is actually a fermented dish made up of a spicy mixture of salted and seasoned vegetables,which includes slices of radish, red pepper,garlic etc..

    The steps of making kimchi include;
    1) Washing the vegetable,mainly cabbage.
    2) Seasoning and stuffing cabbages and lastly,
    3) Storing the kimchi.

    The kimchi made in the winter are stored in doks.These vats are then buried in the earth to prevent freezing.

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    Eating on the Floor -- How Painful

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 15, 2006

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    Eating on the floor at Nolbu Myongga

    If you go to a traditional Korean restaurant, be prepared to sit on the floor at a small table -- especially if you go with Koreans! For most Westerners, sitting on the floor for extended periods of time can quickly become uncomfortable. Drinking doesn't really help -- except if you allow for the fact that it makes you pee, giving you an excuse to get up and stretch your legs. So, what I do when I walk into one of these restaurants is try to get a seat behind which sits a wall -- allowing me something to lean on during respites in the meal. I also recommend wearing pants that are dark to hid the inevitable staining that comes from chopsticking kimchi over your unsettled legs.

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    Kimchi with Every Meal!

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 6, 2006

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    Cutting fresh kimchi in Seoul

    If you visit Seoul, be prepared to eat kimchi. A Korean would not consider a meal complete if it did not include two things: rice and kimchi. In case you don't know, kimchi is cabbage fermented with garlic anf red peppers to form a moist spicy concoction that is a featured side dish. Actually, to say it has to be cabbage is a lie -- there are kimchi zucchinis and kimchi cucumbers and several other varieties. It is said to be a good Korean wife, a woman must know how to make at least 16 types of kimchi and there is a kimchi museum outside Seoul which features hundreds of kimchis.
    Note also in this picture that cissors can be used as a utensil in Asia.

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    Making Kimbap

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jan 13, 2006

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    Kimbap
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    Kimbap is one of the traditional Korean foods. It is similar to Japanese sushi rolls, but kimbap does not always contain fish. I have had kimbap with beef, crab, chicken, and other foods.

    To make kimbap, koreans start with dried seaweed for the outer layer. Sticky rice creates the second layer of the food. On top of the seaweed and sticky rice, you will usually find thin strips of lightly fried ham, eggs, cucumbers, carrots, pickled radish, crab, tuna, topped with a little sesame oil and rolled into a "log" about 1.5 inches in diameter. The log is then cut into 1/2 inch wide disks ready for consumption.

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    How to pull off eating, Seoul style

    by ShaneBarber Written Jan 3, 2006
    me, before i discovered Seoul clothes

    Many traditional restaurants have heated floors and low tables, and you eat sitting down, usually on a pillow, with your legs folded. Make sure you take your shoes off, to spare looks of shock. Koreans eat with their right hands; I've never seen anyone eat with their left hand, which is troubling, because I am left handed. Koreans freely use spoons, so be glad! Spoons for rice meals, spoons for soup, however you want to do it. The uniquely Korean metal chopsticks can be VERY difficult to use for someone not accustomed to them (especially me, trying to pull them off with my right hand). Usually, people share soup meals by ladeling portions into bowls. I do see Koreans pouring drinks for one another, but I think most traditions like this are hanging-on more than they are standards to live by, due to Western influence in the latest generation.

    One thing that annoys the hell out of me are the dainty napkins that ALL Koreans seem to use. I am impressed that they can get away with using them, but at each table where you eat, from Burger King to the most obscure traditional spot, they are there. I usually end up using 10 of them a meal.

    This leads to another quibble I have- it is somewhat rude to wipe or blow your nose at a meal; I have received stares while doing this. The problem is, the food is so spicy, it is like turning on a nasal faucet. I usually end up with a pile of tiny napkins, which I usually pocket and dispose of later, out of shame, lol! Bibimbap comes with an amazing, spicy, garlic paste, that you can use liberally, to your liking, but beware!

    Korean food is usually served in 5 minutes. How do they do it? Well, often they serve the dish in the bowl/burner they prepare it in, so it is still cooking when you get it. Definitely stir.

    Also, you always get a tiny metal cup (usually cleaned via UV rays), which you may refill at a water station nearby (or a bottle of purified mul) at your leisure.

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    Basic Rules

    by jujub Written Feb 22, 2005
    two friends at lake

    When drinking:
    If you are pouring the drink, you never pour for yourself, someone will pour the drink for you, even if you pour for everyone else.

    If someone offers to pour a drink for you, and they are OLDER, pick up that glass with two hands.

    When eating:
    Always wait for the oldest person or the host of the dinner party to start eating first.

    If someone invites you to their house:
    It's customary to bring a gift, usually fruit.

    When entering a house, and floor-sitting restaurants:
    Remove your shoes. Which means, while in Korea, wear good socks (leave the holey socks at home).

    If you compliment someone on something they have, for example, a bookmark, they will offer it to you. Don't be surprised at this kind gesture, and please, let's not abuse it either.

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    Street Vender Food : Tteokbokgi

    by jckim Updated Feb 8, 2005

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    Street Vender Food of favorite Korean peoples. mixes the dressing materials.
    Rice cake, Onion, Suger, Cabbage, ketchup, Odeang( mix and boiled fish ) boiled eggs with hot pepper(Gocheujang) This Teokbokgi is too hot and cheap Street Vender Food

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    Street Vender Food : Ho-Tteok

    by jckim Updated Feb 8, 2005

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    Ho-Tteok is Chinese stuffed Pancake.
    Wheat dough and stuff with suger and bake
    on the hot plate. some time add with peanut and cinnamon. Generally the autumn and winter season vender food. among the famous Ho-Tteok venders, He's get a big money and enjoy popularity. you can find easy Ho-Tteok vender on the street.

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    Street Vender Food : Sundae

    by jckim Updated Jan 30, 2005

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    Sundae is famous street vender food too,
    this food is a Sausage made of Beef and Beancurd in Pig intestine. first time look or eat, you would not eat odious stuff like this
    but almost like a this food korean peoples.
    You can fine its Streets, Small markets, Alleys. There are few different style Sundae.
    Ojingeo Sundae ( Cuttlefish Sundae )sundae Guk ( pork soup mixid with sliced seun-dae sausage )Frizzle Sundae,Sundae with chitterlings

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  • emilytyc's Profile Photo

    Sohju Wine

    by emilytyc Written Nov 15, 2004

    When someone pours sohju in your cup, raise/ touch the cup, say thank you and sip the wine. If you drink it all in one gulp, your host will be pleased.

    it is considered rude if you do not finish the content.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Remove Shoes at Traditional Restaurants

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Aug 25, 2004

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    In traditional Korean Restaurants, you will remove your shoes at the entrance. This means you must wear a decent pair of socks! Also, Koreans do not tie & untie their shoes each time they put them on/take them off. Instead, they tie them very loose so they can be slipped on and off. You would be wise to do the same... your Korean hosts won't want to wait for you to play around with your shoe strings -- they'll be halfway down the block before you finish.

    Note the photo of a shoe rack in Songtan, Korea. My Korean host translated the sign above the rack to read, "please don't leave with nicer shoes than you had when you arrived."

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    Eating, Drinking, and Hiking

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jun 27, 2004

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    Picnic area near Suraksan
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    There are three things all Koreans seem to love: eating, drinking, and hiking. They tend to eat constantly and not gain any weight. Finding an overweight Korean is like finding a skinny American. They just don't exist.

    Koreans love to drink, especially soju (clear rice liquor). This is the national beverage of this country. Throw in maekju (beer), dong-dong ju (milky rice wine), and any other ju you can think of, and you'll have quite a mixture.

    Finally, Korean love to hike. Recently I hiked Mt Surak (Suraksan) north of Seoul. There were so many people there, I had to wait in line for up to 10 minutes just to follow the path. Many Koreans go decked out in all kinds of gear such as fancy jackets, backpacks, aluminum alloy hiking sticks, etc.

    While at Suraksan, I witnessed the Koreans combining all three of their passions at once. Take a look at the picture of Koreans eating and drinking during a break in their hike. It may be hard to see, but some of these groups have several empty bottles of soju.

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Ginseng

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Ginseng

    Korea is world renown for its Ginseng products. They have used the ginseng roots for thousands of years to cure all sorts of ailments. It is said that the ginseng tea is good for the body and mind. Some say it boosts the energy and even prolongs ones life. I highly recommend you buy some and give it a try. The tea is delicious!

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