Hiking, Seoul

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  • Bukansan peak
    Bukansan peak
    by bladedragon
  • Almost vertical climb
    Almost vertical climb
    by bladedragon
  • A cemetary
    A cemetary
    by ByWayOfAlbuquerque
  • Hmmmm's Profile Photo

    Clamber up Suraksan for a View.

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Kangbuk area from Surak Mt. ADI

    Its quite easy to become lost in the myriad of apartment buildings, subway stations, shopping centres and urban entities that make up Seoul. It isn't until one ascends one of the many mountains that surround Seoul
    (in this case Suraksan), does one really grasp the enormity of this city.

    Its massive. Its the thrid largest urban agglomeration on earth, after Tokyo and New York City respectfully.

    I would recommend hiking during the week, because weekends, the mountains around Seoul become crammed with middleaged hikers wearing amking clothes, Norwegian socks and carrying enough gear to scale k2. You've been warned.

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  • schwein's Profile Photo

    Fall foliage

    by schwein Written Nov 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fall in Seoul

    Fall is the best (and shortest!) season to be outside in Seoul.

    The weather is not hot and humid, and the breezes keep the nanky air pollution away.
    The mountains offer a plethora of colours to behold. Take a camera!

    I like hiking/cycling on the ridges south of Seoul. You can take subway there easily. Either Demosan or Guryongsan stations on the yellow line are good for a quick couple hours. Exit either station and walk south, you'll see the mountain ridges. Find a path and head up.

    If you want a bit more of a hike, head to either Namhansanseong station on the pink line, or Achasan on the purple line. Both are great hikes, with amazing views on a clear day.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Achasan and Yongmasan (Mountains) Hiking * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 15, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me at Yongmasan
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    Achasan and Yongmasan are two mountains connected by a ridge on the eastern edge of Seoul. In fact, the ridge forms the border between the city of Seoul and Gyeonggi-do Province. For a nice hike, take the subway to Achasan Station (Line 5) and climb to the top of Achasan, head north and cross the ridge to Yongmasan, then descend to Myeonmok Station or Sagajeong Station on Line 7.

    When I hiked Achasan and Yongmasan in fall 2003, I ended up descending through the back yard of Seoul Junior College. I strolled through a class of Korean children studying Spanish. They just had to practice their Espanol on me... I speak more Hangeul than Spanish!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • itsCharlie's Profile Photo

    Chill out by the old city walls

    by itsCharlie Updated Mar 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This is a nice little walk you can do right in the city center. It only takes about an hour and it's usually pretty deserted. You walk past a asmospheric temple where you can see Shamon ceremonies- (i once saw a pig's head being worshiped!)- an easy walk up a kinda steep hill through the forest up to the Old city walls. A few soju bottles set out for the spirits along the way, but not many people.
    WHERE: Get off at the Dongniummun station on line 3 and head up the first side street to the north, past the driving range up the street and up through the temple. Just keep going up any stairs you come across!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Ansan (Mountain) Hiking * * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Feb 2, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View of Seoul from Ansan
    4 more images

    Hiking Ansan is a nice break from the traffic and concrete of Seoul, but provides some stunning views of the city.

    During the Korean War, Ansan was known as "Hill 296," and it was the site of some of the bloodiest fighting for the American forces in the entire war. After the Incheon landings on 15 September 1950, the US Marines moved toward Seoul, crossing to the north side of the Han River near Haenjusanseong. On 22 September, the Marine 5th Division approached the entrenched North Korean forces upon Hill 296. The battle would last four days, and at the end some US companies had suffered 85% casualties, and more than 1,200 NK troops lay dead in their trenches.

    To get to Ansan, take Subway line 3 to Dongnimmun Station. Walk behind Seodaemun Prison History Hall (to the south) near the apartment complexes. Start up the paved trail and keep heading up... the trail eventually turns to dirt. Try a different way down -- the trail down the south side of Ansan takes you past Bongwansa Buddhist Temple and to Ewha Women's University.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • mountainpoet's Profile Photo

    Kwanaksan Hiking

    by mountainpoet Written May 23, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Great rocks - great trails.

    To the south of the river is a great park called Kwanaksan. Easily noticed by the TV towers on the summit.

    A good place to start is from the Seoul National University - get off the subway at the station of the same name. A short bus to the Uni and then to the right of the entrance is the park gate. 500won to get in. And just follow any path.

    The friendliest Korean are always found hiking in the hills.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • ByWayOfAlbuquerque's Profile Photo

    Hiking: Gupabal Station (Subway Line 3)

    by ByWayOfAlbuquerque Updated Aug 1, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    There are some smallish mountains (hills) near Gupabal Station that have some well-maintained trails carved through a densely wooded setting. In this area it is also possible to see:
    - A very large artificial waterfall (See Photo #4)
    - Some remnants from the Korean war, or that's what I think they are (See Photo #3)
    - Modern luxury apartment communities on the outskirts of Seoul (if you are curious about the various ways in how and where different Koreans choose to live their lives, this might be interesting for you to wander around this area)
    - Some fine views toward Goyang-shi

    The trail head that I will give directions to was one that I stumbled upon. Here is how to get there:
    - Get off at Gupabal Station (Exit 1). Walk past all of the other hikers waiting for buses to other nearby, more popular hiking trails.
    - Take Bus #7723 or #8775 and get off at Jingwan High School (sorry my keyboard isn't capable of writing in Hangul)
    - Just past Jingwan High School (walking towards the other school next to it), in between the high school and the other school is a walking track on your right. Get on the walking track and start heading towards the mountain.
    - When you get near the mountain you should see a small dirt trail leading towards the trees, take the trail and when you get to a ditch for water run-off take a left.
    - Follow the ditch for a while. You will pass a metal grate that looks like a little foot bridge for crossing the ditch, at the third metal grate you see cross it and you should see a trail head in front of you. (See Photo #5)
    - Now just follow this trail up the mountain and it will lead you to a set of grueling stairs taking you up to the flatter ridge on top of the mountain where the wider main trail is. I walked on this section for a good 45 minutes before deciding to turn around, but it looked like it went on for a while heading in the direction towards Seoul.

    This hike might be considered more of a "walk" for some of you, but it's relatively close to Seoul and a nice chance to get out of the city for a spell, that's why I posted it.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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  • bladedragon's Profile Photo

    Hike Mount Bukan

    by bladedragon Updated Mar 27, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gate
    3 more images

    Mount Bukan (Bukansan) is located just North of Seoul.
    You can reach there by train. Normally you can see lots of people there with their hiking gears, so that day we just follow them and ended up at a small trail beside a restaurant.
    So we decided that it was probably the path leading to the peak and started to hike the trail up. After a while (not too long) we saw a ranger's station and we asked the ranger if it was the right path up to the peak that we wanted to go.
    But it seemed that it wasn't... T.T
    It's leading to other peaks so we decided to go back and went to another entrance (which was actually looked like a park entrance) that one of the ranger told us.
    At the top there is a gate (looked like a gate of restored old defense wall) and from there another 10-15 minutes tough almost vertical climb to the very top.
    It was a huge rock peak with only necessary wire-railings, but the good thing is you can see as far as you're able to without any obstruction.
    The space on top was roughly around 2x2m and there's also this S.Korean flag, so it was quite cramped up there.

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  • elPierro's Profile Photo

    Bukhansan

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    If you like enjoying a bit of culture, nature, are just in need of some fresh air, or if you like hiking. A trip to Bukhansan combines everything.

    The mountainrange on the northside of Seoul can be climbed, there are no cablecars and the route is pretty difficult at the end, though there are ropes everywhere to hang-on to.

    Bukhansan is about 840m high and the rang contains various hikepaths to any of the mountains and the area itself, a climb to the highest mountain takes about 1 and a half hours.

    I don't need to explain the hiking path, the nature is just beautifull as everywhere in Korea, the view is unbeatable though Seoul is often covered in smog, but you still get a glimpse of how big this city is, the northeastern stretch which is clearest visible could simply stand for a capital city.

    The cultural part is because Koreans are crazy of hiking, if you are here on your own, just follow other people, getting closer to the top you may experience traffic jams on weekends, as rows of hikers are waiting to move-up to the top. From there everyone spreads out for a pick-nick and heads back down afterwards.

    The tracks cost a little to enter, there is a free bus leading to a monastry (they expect you to make a small donation for the shrine) from where you get access to the hiking paths.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • ByWayOfAlbuquerque's Profile Photo

    Hiking: Gupabal Station (Subway Line 3)

    by ByWayOfAlbuquerque Written Aug 1, 2009
    4 more images

    There are some smallish mountains (hills) near Gupabal Station that have some well-maintained trails in a densely wooded setting. In this area it is also possible to see:
    - A very large artificial waterfall (See Photo #4)
    - Some remnants from the Korean war, or that's what I think they are (See Photo #3)
    - Modern luxury apartment communities on the outskirts of Seoul (if you are curious about seeing the various styles of how and where different Koreans choose to live their lives this might be interesting to wander around this area)
    - Fine views toward Goyang-shi

    The trail head that I will give directions to was one that I stumbled upon. Here is how to get there:
    - Get off at Gupabal Station (Exit 1). Walk past all of the other hikers waiting for buses to other nearby, more popular hiking trails.
    - Take Bus #7723 or #8775 and get off at Jingwan High School (sorry my keyboard isn't capable for writing in Hangul)
    - Just past Jingwan High School (walking towards the other school next to it), in between the high school and the other school is a walking track on your right. At the walking track start heading towards the mountain.
    - When you get near the mountain you should see a small trail leading towards the mountain, take the trail and when you get to a ditch for water run-off take a left.
    - Follow the ditch for a while. You will pass a metal grate that looks like a little foot bridge to cross the ditch, at the third metal grate you see cross it and you should see a trail head in front of you. (See Photo #5)
    - Now just follow this trail up the mountain and it will lead you to a set of grueling stairs taking you up to the flatter ridge on top of the mountain where the wider main trail is. I walked on this section for a good 45 minutes before deciding to turn around but it looked like it went on for a while heading in the direction towards Seoul.

    This hike might be considered more of a "walk" for some of you, but it's relatively close to Seoul and a nice chance to get out of the city for a spell, that's why I posted it.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • mazzollat's Profile Photo

    Good mountain hiking.

    by mazzollat Written Feb 10, 2004
    Pukhan Mountain north of Seoul.

    Korean people love to hike in the mountains. There are numerous places to go. Check a local bookstore to get maps. A crash course in learning to read to read the Korean alphabet would be a great help and it's not hard.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • jeaniek13's Profile Photo

    The places are not in...

    by jeaniek13 Written Aug 25, 2002

    The places are not in Seoul--but a distance away. SORAK-SAN (MT. SORAK) in on the eastern coast of Korea. If you love to hike and eat raw fish, this is your place. You can go to Sok'cho, the city near Mt. Sorak, and walk by different vendors live catch and choose what you would like to eat. Then you can take the seafood to a local restaurant and they'll prepare it for you, at a cost of course. PUSAN, is in southeastern Seoul. It too is located on the coast and is considered the mainland's beach. It isn't that big, but can get jam packed during the summer months. You'd have a better time visiting CHEJU-DO (Cheju Island). On the island is Mt. Halla, lots of greenery complimented by the sandy beaches. There is another national park/mountain worth visiting: MT. CHIRI.

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  • mountainpoet's Profile Photo

    The Beaten Track

    by mountainpoet Updated May 5, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Standing on Pi-Bong.

    Hiking in Pukan-san is great - but can get very crowded on the weekends. The National Park is in Seoul and gets visited alot.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park

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  • mountainpoet's Profile Photo

    Bae Kun Dae

    by mountainpoet Written May 8, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Queues with Insu-Bong in background

    Baekun-dae is the highest peak in Pukhansan National Park. It;s a great walk at 840m - but ccan get a little overcrowded. you often need to wait in line to get to the top and down again.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing

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