Korean Historical Landmark, Seoul

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  • Soellung Royal Tombs
    Soellung Royal Tombs
    by IreneMcKay
  • Me at the tombs
    Me at the tombs
    by IreneMcKay
  • Climbing the steps of the Fortress
    Climbing the steps of the Fortress
    by DanCerdena
  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Demilitarized Zone: Checkpoint 3

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 21, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Demilitarized Zone: Checkpoint 3

    Another interesting stop was Checkpoint 3, which offer an amazing view on Propaganda Village in Nth Korea. This village is just for show as no one lived on it. In fact, they use it primarily to spread propaganda in the form of a classical militaristic music advertisement, which the Nth troops actually played for us to entertained our ears while we were there:).

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    Demilitarized Zone: Bridge of no Return

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Demilitarized Zone: Bridge of no Return

    Then there are several stops to contemplate various important sights within the DMZ. I got to see the infamous "Bridge of No Return," where at the end of the war the prisoners from each side were given the chance to cross the bridge once, never to return to the other side again.

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    Demilitarized Zone: the Conference Table

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Demilitarized Zone: the Conference Table

    For an even more impressive outlook of the Korean War, there is no better tour then one of the many daily ones to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) at Panmunjeom and Camp Bafis. Although the Cold War of the 20th century has come to an end in the rest of the world, things are still hot and boiling between the two Koreas. I took a tour with USO that not only took me into this border, but also let me have a view into several famous locations such as the actual conference table where talks take place between the Nth and the Sth. It was here that the ceasefire agreement was signed in 1953. Make no mistake; the Korean War is not officially over. I also had the pleasure of actually stepping into Nth Korea for a few minutes (nope, didn't have my passport stamped...argh) as this room is placed right on the border.

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  • Korean Folk Village

    by cjcross Written Mar 20, 2004

    The Korean Folk Village is worth a day trip if you are visiting Seoul. It's a collection of actual traditional buildings reassembled on a site outside of Seoul. We took the subway from downtown to Suwon followed by a short bus ride to the village for about a tenth the cost of the organized tour being offered at our hotel. It probably took a bit longer but wasn't hard to do (there are plenty of English signs) and finding our own way was part of the adventure. You purchase the admission ticket which includes the bus trip across the street from the Suwon train station.

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    Min Seok Cheon (Yong In): A Taste of Yesteryear.

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Traditional Style Abodes. Pic: Aaron Irving

    KOREAN FOLK VILLAGE: MIN SEOK CHON.

    This Place is soooo much fun, and sooooo interesting. Great place to take pictures, see Traditional korean crafts, culinary tradition, architectural, culture history and cultural heritage. I love coming out here.

    Ok some guff: The Korean Folk Village opened in October 1974 as an open-air folk museum and international tourist attraction for both Korean and foreign visitors. Due to its proximity to Seoul, it remains one of the best-known of Korea's folk villages, although those in the countryside tend to be more authentic.

    Performances of Farmers' Music and Dance and Tightrope Acrobatics are performed in the performing arena twice a day. During spring, summer, autumn, and on weekends and holidays, traditional customs and ceremonies for coming-of-age, marriage, funeral, ancestor memorial, and other ceremonies are recreated. Check the schedule of the day's events near the main entrance. Try to arrive early for each performance to get a good viewing position.

    Set in a natural environment of over 240 acres, visitors can experience an authentic atmosphere with over 260 traditional houses reminiscent of the late Joseon Dynasty. Also included are various household goods from the different regions. All these features have been relocated and restored to provide visitors with a general view of Korean food, clothing, and housing styles from the past. In over a dozen workshops, visitors can see artisans practice their handicraft skills in pottery, basket and bamboo weaving, paper making, and many other traditional arts. Watch as these master craftsmen (and women) create beautiful designs in brass, embroidery, iron, and clay.

    I sooooo recommend a foray into Kyonggi Do to see this fascinating village.

    Bus:
    (from Seoul)
    10-1 (from Shangdawon)
    100-2, 1116 (From Chamsil-Pundang)

    (from Suwon)
    37, 59 (from Suwon station )
    Free shuttle (from Suwon subway station)

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    Korean Traditional Market.

    by Sharrie Written Sep 17, 2002

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    Korean Traditional Market: Modelled after village markets of the late Choson Dynasty, it's filled with people making folk crafts, preparing traditional Korean food & drinks, & even conducting fortune-telling rituals! Most crowded part of the museum :-)

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    3 Kingdoms.

    by Sharrie Written Sep 17, 2002

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    3 Kingdoms: Composed of 3 exhibit hall for Koguryo, Packche, Shilla. Introducing cultural distinction of each nation & manifesting present historical site using model to enable visitors to understand the mode of living during those times.

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    Miniature Village.

    by Sharrie Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Miniature Village: Reduced to 1/8 of the actual size, it gives an overall view of the natural environment & architecture of villagers druing the period of Choson Dynasty, Korea's last monarchy.

    The palace, the noble life & lifestyle & customs are all reproduced here. Some interesting displays are: The 1st Birthday Feast, The 60th Birthday Feast, Sodang (Primary Elementary School) & Funeral Procession.

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    Historical Exhibition Hall.

    by Sharrie Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Historical Exhibition Hall: 6 rooms representing different eras in Korean history from prehistoric time through the Koguryo dynasties.

    Displays include the evolution of man, manufacturing processes of stone & bronze implements, & lifestyles of each period are being illustrated through paintings & restored archaelogical relics.

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    Prehistoric Housing...

    by kgurl Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Prehistoric Housing Site
    Amsa-dong,
    Historical Property No. 267

    Amsa-dong 155, Kangdong-gu, Seoul

    On a hill above the southern bank of the Han River in the eastern part of the capital of Seoul lie the remains of a community dating to the Neolithic period. The people lived in pit dwellings with straw thatch roofs. They used stone tools and weapons, fished, tilled the earth and produced a low-fire 'comb pattern' pottery that resembles pottery discovered in the Volga river basin, Siberia and Japan. In the southern region, Neolithic man lived in houses built on stilts.

    Neolithic life centered around a stone hearth, and these people appear to have stored their food in pits. The entrance to their homes faced southeast, catching the sun and blocking the predominant winds. The size of the houses varied, but generally families appear to have had four or five members. Among the artifacts found at these Neolithic sites are pottery, arrowheads, stone sinkers and fish bones. Implements traditionally used by men, such as arrowheads and fishing sinkers, are generally found near the entrances to the dwellings, while implements related to women and cooking, such as pottery and fish bones, are found near the hearth, away from the entrance.

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    Lotte World Museum. This is...

    by Sarah97 Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Lotte World Museum. This is the miniature of Kyungbok-gung(palace) when big ceremony is held. See the little dolls wearing various kinds of Hanbok. Depends on who you are, there are certain type of the cloth you have to wear in special court occasions.

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    Korea is a country with more...

    by ff44ff Written Aug 24, 2002

    Korea is a country with more than 5000years of history.
    There are many small museums where you can find our
    old life style and fine arts.

    Ask at 'tourist information center' or mail me at

    ff44ff@hananet.net

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    World Heritage Fortress Outside Seoul

    by DanCerdena Written May 7, 2007
    Entrance to Hwaseong Fortress
    4 more images

    Take Subway line 1 to Suwon, then take Bus Nbr 11 or 13 to Padalmun. Entails lots of walking and hiking hence make sure you wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

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    • Architecture
    • Adventure Travel

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    Performance Hall.

    by Sharrie Written Sep 17, 2002

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    Performance Hall: An auditorium for regular performances of farmers music, folk dance & drama, & shamanist exorcism rites.

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