Korean Historical Landmark, Seoul

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  • Soellung Royal Tombs
    Soellung Royal Tombs
    by IreneMcKay
  • Me at the tombs
    Me at the tombs
    by IreneMcKay
  • Midpoint to Hwaseong Fortress
    Midpoint to Hwaseong Fortress
    by DanCerdena
  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Make you kid don a Hanbok ( traditional dress )

    by bpacker Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Royal guards and their mini-me at Deoksugung

    If donning a hanbok in Seoul isn't your cup of tea, force junior to wear one. Chances are, he'll look cuter than you and everyone, including the locals will want to make friends with him. Just take look at this picture. If you look carefully, the guard is actually holding hands with the kid and... maybe asking him if he wants to take over .

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  • kdoc13's Profile Photo

    Cheung Wa Dae - The Blue House

    by kdoc13 Written May 23, 2004

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    The Blue House, where the President lives.

    Ok, it may just be the Political Science degree I wasted 4 years of college on, but there is something about a Presidential Home which I just can't pass up. The Blue house is the Korean version of the US White House. It is not quite as big, but the blue tiled roof is more attractive than the white marble mansion in Washington DC.

    Unfortunately, it is just as hard to get into. But it can be done. The tickets are free, and can be obtained at the information booth. You will have to go between 10 am and 3 pm on Fridays and Saturdays durring select seasons. The last time I was in Seoul, I took the tour and managed to get a look at past President Kim (the 2001 version of a President Kim.) It is a very nice tour and one that surprised me as to how the President lives, compared with his US counterpart.

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    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Look beyond palace walls and halls...

    by bpacker Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Symmetry, Gyeongbokgung

    Many a disappointed traveller to Korea has lamented about the "Chinese-ness" of the palaces and halls. That's because they haven't looked past the ancient architecture...discover instead those silent, natives of the past that guard those palace walls. Yes, yes, I meant the mythical creatures and not the old pensioners who jog around those places to kill time. There are hundreds of these strange creatures ( Bulgsari, Haetae , etc ) that inhabit the palaces and temples of Korea.
    To find out more about them, read my travelogue, Silent Guards

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    Min Seok Cheon (Yong In): A Taste of Yesteryear.

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Traditional Style Abodes. Pic: Aaron Irving

    KOREAN FOLK VILLAGE: MIN SEOK CHON.

    This Place is soooo much fun, and sooooo interesting. Great place to take pictures, see Traditional korean crafts, culinary tradition, architectural, culture history and cultural heritage. I love coming out here.

    Ok some guff: The Korean Folk Village opened in October 1974 as an open-air folk museum and international tourist attraction for both Korean and foreign visitors. Due to its proximity to Seoul, it remains one of the best-known of Korea's folk villages, although those in the countryside tend to be more authentic.

    Performances of Farmers' Music and Dance and Tightrope Acrobatics are performed in the performing arena twice a day. During spring, summer, autumn, and on weekends and holidays, traditional customs and ceremonies for coming-of-age, marriage, funeral, ancestor memorial, and other ceremonies are recreated. Check the schedule of the day's events near the main entrance. Try to arrive early for each performance to get a good viewing position.

    Set in a natural environment of over 240 acres, visitors can experience an authentic atmosphere with over 260 traditional houses reminiscent of the late Joseon Dynasty. Also included are various household goods from the different regions. All these features have been relocated and restored to provide visitors with a general view of Korean food, clothing, and housing styles from the past. In over a dozen workshops, visitors can see artisans practice their handicraft skills in pottery, basket and bamboo weaving, paper making, and many other traditional arts. Watch as these master craftsmen (and women) create beautiful designs in brass, embroidery, iron, and clay.

    I sooooo recommend a foray into Kyonggi Do to see this fascinating village.

    Bus:
    (from Seoul)
    10-1 (from Shangdawon)
    100-2, 1116 (From Chamsil-Pundang)

    (from Suwon)
    37, 59 (from Suwon station )
    Free shuttle (from Suwon subway station)

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    • School Holidays

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  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Revolution in Tagpol Park

    by bpacker Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Pensioners paying homage to a short speaker

    Here's Korea version of London's Hyde Park . The only difference is that speakers here don't stand on soap boxes and they're a lot older. Enthusiastic, politically minded pensioners make fiery speeches almost daily at this place. Interesting to note that years ago in 1911, a revolution took place here pretty much the same way. You can read the fiery declaration of indepence on the walls of the Park as it's printed in Hangul and English. If not, click here to read it.

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    Don a Hanbok ( Korean Dress ) in Korea

    by bpacker Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Koreans? Aniyo, they're from HK

    Ok, so this is cheesy, but you'll amuse lots of bystanders like myself so what's the harm? For a fee, you can borrow a hanbok from a small shop in Gyeongbokgung palace and pretend to an ancient royal in Seoul. Think twice before doing this is winter as the costumes are wafer thin. The HongKong tourists in the pictures are trying very hard to smile in the 5c weather.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Graves of Baekje Kings, Right in Seoul!

    by AKtravelers Updated Apr 28, 2006

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    A 5th century Baekju tomb
    2 more images

    The Baekje kingdom was one of three monarchies that divided up Korea before the peninsula was unified for the first time in 676 CE by the Shilla Empire. The Baekje controlled an expanse of territory in the central part of the Korean peninsula and used Seoul as their capital for a time. To bury their monarchs they built terraced mounds such as the ones you see behind me -- these mounds date from around 470 CE
    I found these mounds by taking a bus south from the Jamsil metro stop and noting the sign that opinted towards them. No one had ever told me about them nor had I read about them in a guide book, though I was aware of Baekje burial sites in Seoul due to my recent visit to the National Museum. Putting two and two together, when I came back via the metro's pink line, I got off at the Sokcheon stop (just south of Jamsil) and checked the neighborhood map they post in every subway station. Sure enough, on it was marked a park with Baekje graves. When I arrived, it was walled in traditional stone and beautifully landscaped, filled with local children and their families. I wouldn't go out of my way to come here unless I had an unhealthy fascination with tombs, but it was a pleasant visit given that I was in the area and I've seen most of Seoul's other sights.
    In wandering around te graves I met a guy who claimed to be a retired police officer despite the fact he was sleeping in the dirt and would cock his leg while farting loudly every 100 meters or so (though he never stopped talking or seemed to consider this an etiquette issue). Though bizarre, he was nice enough so I chatted with him until he walked me right to the subway turnstile. His picture is shown here next to the only mound tomb in the park.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Amsa Prehistoric Settlement Site * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ticket for Amsa Prehistoric Site
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    Amsa Prehistoric Site is an ancient settlement along the Han River and contains several reconstructed huts, a museum, and many artifacts from the area. This is one of the largest settlement sites ever discovered on the Korean Peninsula from the Neolithic Era (4000-3500 BC). In this period of time, the people lived in circular dugout huts with the floors 2-3 feet below ground level. The roofs were made of logs and straw.

    During my visit the place was full of school children, but a wonderful tour guide who spoke English gave me a personal tour of the museum.

    Amsa Prehistoric Settlement Site is located in Amsa-dong at the end of subway line 8, Amsa Station. From the station, continue to walk northeast for 15 or 20 minutes until you see the signs for Amsa, or take a taxi.

    Entrance is just 500 Won for adults and 300 Won for children.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Haenjusanseong (Mountain Fortress) * * * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Feb 2, 2007

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    View of the Victory Monument
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    Haenjusanseong is a beautiful park with a great view overlooking the Han River. This ancient fortress was made famous as the site where Korean General Gwon Yul defeated 30,000 Japanese soldiers with only 2,000 Korean defenders in 1592.

    In 1950 following the Incheon Invasion, US Marines first crossed the Han River near this location on their way to liberate Seoul. There is a small monument near the parking area documenting this event.

    Today this is a wonderful area for a walk along the fortress's earthen walls. Be sure to visit the Victory monument at the top of the hill as well as the two pavilions overlooking the river.

    During my visit, I brought a book and just relaxed and read for a few hours. This is a very quiet spot!

    To get to Haenjusanseong, take the Gyeonguison Rail Line from Seoul Station to Haengsin Station, then catch bus 85-1 to the fortress.

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  • Communications Museum

    by mke1963 Written Apr 29, 2005

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    Just a few steps away from the Jogyesa Temple entrance is a small museum on the history of postal communications in Korea. Just one room, in a small elegant building, the history of the Korean post office and its royal predecessors is explained in simple term. Plenty of old documents, uniforms and sets of the very first stamps used make this a good educational stop on the way to the temple.

    The building has been nicely preserved - this was the first post office in Korea - and it is surrounded by a small garden which will form part of the extended Jogyesa Temple when renovations are finished. Some of Korea's interesting stamps have been recreated on tiles laid into the brick paving.
    There is also a small memorial statue to one of Korea's independence martyrs from he Japanese occupation period.

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    Site of the Western Camp of Geumwiyeong

    by jckim Written Feb 19, 2005

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    Geumwiyeong means are Capital Garrison.
    it was one of the five army garrisons located around the capital area during the late Joseon Dynasty.it had its western camp here.
    located by left side front of Changdeokgung Palace.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    3 Kingdoms.

    by Sharrie Written Sep 17, 2002

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    3 Kingdoms: Composed of 3 exhibit hall for Koguryo, Packche, Shilla. Introducing cultural distinction of each nation & manifesting present historical site using model to enable visitors to understand the mode of living during those times.

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    Korean Traditional Market.

    by Sharrie Written Sep 17, 2002

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    Korean Traditional Market: Modelled after village markets of the late Choson Dynasty, it's filled with people making folk crafts, preparing traditional Korean food & drinks, & even conducting fortune-telling rituals! Most crowded part of the museum :-)

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Seolleung Royal Tombs

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 1, 2013

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    Soellung Royal Tombs
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    Seolleung Royal Tombs houses the burial mounds of King Seongjong (1469-1494), his wife Queen Jeonghyeon, and King Jungjong (1506-1544) of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

    The burial mounds are surrounded by small sculptures called Japsang. These are carved in the shape of animals and were believed to exorcise evil spirits.

    The king's burial mound is surrounded by sculptures of sheep and tigers. These act as guardians for the dead King. The queen’s tomb is simpler, but it also has stone sculptures.

    The area around the tombs is green and wooded. People come here to relax and enjoy nature.

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Demilitarized Zone: Bridge of no Return

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Demilitarized Zone: Bridge of no Return

    Then there are several stops to contemplate various important sights within the DMZ. I got to see the infamous "Bridge of No Return," where at the end of the war the prisoners from each side were given the chance to cross the bridge once, never to return to the other side again.

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