DMZ - DeMilitarized Zone, Seoul

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  • North and South Korea border, joint security area
    North and South Korea border, joint...
    by loja
  • North and South Korea border, joint security area
    North and South Korea border, joint...
    by loja
  • North and South Korea border, joint security area
    North and South Korea border, joint...
    by loja
  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Day trip

    by xaver Written Oct 24, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I came here with my friend, it's a hour and half driving far from Seoul. Anyway it's plenty of bus tour leaving from the capital. Ticket price for 3 hours tour is 8700 wong. You are suposed to have your passport with you, bt if you ignored that as I did and you have a Korean friend with you, then he/she can guarantee for you, she will guarantee that you will not escape in north Korea. The tour include a tunnel that north koreans digged. It
    is 265 meters long, going down is easy, and you can come up with a train if you book for it, we came up walking and it was hard but not as hard as crawing in the lower part of tunnel. It wasn't done for high people. You are not allowed to bring cameras, nor telephones nor bags inside the tunnel.
    There is a sort of no man land betwen the two koreas.It is surrounded on both sides by watchtowers and it exists from 1953, after the end of the war. This strip of land has been depopulated in order to create a buffer zone betwen the two countries.
    The human absence has created a heaven for wildlife which includes more than 67 endangered species. when the man moved out, animals and plants moved back in. And this happened even if in thd DMZ there is an estimated number of 1.2 milions of landmines.

    DMZ Tunnel No man land Peace bell bridge
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • School Holidays

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    Panmunjom, DMZ

    by loja Updated Sep 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we were in Seoul, we also decided to go to the DMZ - demilitarized zone.

    We booked a tour to the border, for more information you can write me a message. Mostly tour includes: Camp Bonifas, JSA (Joint Security Area), conference room, freedom house adn bridge of no return.

    We visited all of those places and I can honestly say that it was a great experience. Atmospehre was a little bit electirc because there were soldiers around and it was a border (North Korea and South Korea are still technically at war). But we had a Korean guide, she always told us what to do, when to take pictures.... ''No pictures, no pictures! Oh, why you don't listen to me?'' (c) Haha, she always told this to Japanese tourists.

    When we arrived to JSA, Joint Security Area, we saw many tourists BUT on North Korean side! Oh, it was a great feeling... You can see it on one of my photos.
    Overall experience is amazing! 100% you should go and visit DMZ!

    *-*-*-*

    Before going to the JSA, we signed a visitors declaration, where was written: ''The visit to the Joint Security Area at Panmunjom will entail the entrance into a hostile area and the possibility of injury or death as a direct result of enemy action'' (c)

    North and South Korea border, joint security area North and South Korea border, joint security area North and South Korea border, conference room North and South Korea border, joint security area North and South Korea border, joint security area

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    DMZ - Panmungak

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 18, 2013

    ُThe most impressive building on the North Korean side of the Joint Security Area is called Panmungak. This gray, three-story structure was completed in August 1969, and it houses the North Korean JSA guards and it serves as a waiting are of North Koreans participating in talks with the South. This facility is occasionally open to the North Korean people who visit the DMZ.

    When people visit the south side of the JSA, northern soldiers stand watch with binoculars. Occasionally you will also see a curtain pulled up in Panmungak so a guard can snap pictures of visitors.

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    DMZ - USO Tours

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 17, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The United Services Organization, in conjunction with Koridoor Tours, offers numerous DMZ tours each week. For 96,000 Won per person (in 2013), you will take a bus from downtown Seoul to the DMZ. Stops include the Third Tunnel of Aggression, the Dora Observatory, Dorasan Station, Camp Bonifas, and the Joint Security Area. Some tours also have a stop for dinner at a cafeteria at the Inter-Korean Transit Office next to Dorasan Station.

    The highlight of the tours is the visit to the Joint Security Area. The other stops tend to be a bit boring and time consuming, and they may feel like a waste of time if your visit in Korea is short.

    The USO is located in Yongsan-gu near the National War Memorial. Located about 5 minutes north of Samgakji Station.

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    DMZ - Military Armistice Commission Buildings

    by Ewingjr98 Written May 17, 2013

    At the center of the Joint Security Area, straddling the Military Demarcation Line, stand a series of silver and baby blue United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission buildings.

    All visitors are allowed to enter the center UNCMAC building where peace talks are held. But be wary of the burly South Korean soldiers standing in Tae Kwon Do stances with sunglasses -- they guard the door leading to North Korea. They serve a dual purpose -- to protect visitors from the North Koreans, but also to prevent people from entering the North. While in this building, you may step across the line into the North...but only for a few minutes until your tour continues.

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    DMZ - Third Tunnel of Agrression

    by Ewingjr98 Written May 16, 2013

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    The Third Tunnel of Northern Aggression is located near Panmunjom at the DMZ. It was the third of four confirmed tunnels dug by North Korea to establish invasion routes into the South. There are believed to be at least 20 tunnels from the north to the south in total, and it is estimated that the tunnels would allow 30,000 soldiers an hour, armed with light weapons, into South Korea. The tunnel was discovered in 1978, when its location was revealed by a North Korean defector.

    Today the third tunnel is a popular tourist stop when visiting the DMZ from Seoul. There are two entrances to the Southern side of the tunnel, one via tram and one that must be descended and ascended on foot. The tram is much easier, but not always available. The walk takes 5-10 minutes each way, and does get a bit claustrophobic once you enter the small, wet, dark portion of the caves made by North Korea. Directly under the DMZ, the south built three walls, 2 of which can be viewed by tour groups. Unfortunately photos are not allowed at the walls under the DMZ, and most tour guides tell visitors not to take photos anywhere in the tunnels.

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    DMZ - Propaganda Village

    by Ewingjr98 Written May 15, 2013

    Kijong-dong is the official name of a small village located on the North Korean side of the border int he DMZ. It is one of only two villages in the entire DMZ, along with the South Korean village of Daeseong-dong.

    Kijong-dong is known outside of North Korea as "Propaganda Village," mainly because most of the town is fake. The buildings, constructed in the 1950s, appear to be empty concrete shells without rooms or windows, but wired with electricity for the illusion of inhabitants. Also, until 2004, load speakers in the village broadcasted propaganda messages into the south. Finally, Propaganda Village is also home to a 525-foot tall flagpole, but solely to be taller than the 323-foot tall flagpole constructed on the South Korean side of the border.

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    DMZ - Dorasan Station

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 15, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dorasan Station, on the on the Gyeongui Line, is the last train station before the North Korean border. For about a year trains were allowed to pass through this station and across the border to Kaesong's industrial city, but these only ran from 2007-2008.

    The station may no longer be an active gateway to the north, but it is the terminus for four trains per day from Seoul. From here, visitors are very close to Dora Observatory and the third North Korean invasion tunnel. You can also buy a souvenir ticket to Pyeongyang, 205 kilometers to the north, for just 500 Won (USD 0.50). The station lies 56 kilometers from Seoul.

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    DMZ - Dora Observatory

    by Ewingjr98 Written May 15, 2013

    The Dora Observatory is located on Mount Dora, just across the border between North and South Korea. This tourist destination has an observation room and an outdoor observation deck that offer great views into North Korea. The area is open for tourists and it has a small gift shop, public restrooms, and a small temple.

    From here you can look into North Korea over the DMZ to see propaganda village and the world's tallest flagpole, as well as Kaesong.

    Dora Observatory is next to Dorasan Station, the last South Korean train station before the border, and very close to the third North Korean invasion tunnel.

    View into North Korea

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    DMZ - Camp Bonifas

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 15, 2013

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    Camp Bonifas is located just 3 kilometers southeast of the Joint Security Area near the DMZ. This is the home of the United Nations Command Security Battalion—Joint Security Area, which is responsible for patrolling the JSA and protecting visitors to the area.

    The UNC Security Battalion also provides tours of the JSA. The tours begin with a visit to the new visitors center, where guests must sign a form labelled UNC Reg 551-1, which warns prisoners of the dangers of the DMZ. This form reads in part: "The visit to the Joint Security Area at Panmunjom will entail entry into a hostile area and possibility of injury or death as a direct result of enemy action." After signing the form, the military personnel at the JSA give a very good and informative briefing about the Korean War, the DMZ, and the JSA. Next guests enter UNC buses for the ride to the JSA.

    The visitors center at Camp Bonifas has a large gift shop, selling items to include North Korean goods, and it has a small museum.

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    DMZ - Bridge of No Return

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 15, 2013

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    The Bridge of No Return was for many years the only bridge connecting the Joint Security Area at the DMZ with North Korea. The bridge itself straddles the Military Demarcation Line (MDL) which is the actual border between North and South. After the Korean War ended, the bridge was used for prisoner exchanges where the prisoners were free to choose to stay in the north or south, but once the decision was made, it was final. The prisoners could never return to the other side, hence the name of the bridge.

    Until the axe murder incident of 1976, the North Korean soldiers used this bridge to man their posts within the JSA, but after the incident the forces in the JSA were ordered to stay on their own side of the border, and North Korea constructed a new bridge to the north.

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    DMZ - Site of the Axe Murder Incident

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 15, 2013

    In the Joint Security Area of the DMZ, next tot he Bridge of No Return, is the site of the Axe Murder Incident. At this spot in 1976, a US Army Captain and a US Army Lieutenant were killed, and 8 other UN soldiers were wounded while trying to "prune" a tree to improve visibility between checkpoints.

    Later, the UN responded with Operation Paul Bunyan on 21 August 1976. This show of overwhelming force including an 83-man tree-cutting crew, backed by a 64-man South Korean special forces unit, 20 utility helicopters, 7 cobra attack helicopters, and a number of B-52 bombers, F-4 Phantoms fighters, South Korean F-5 fighters, and the aircraft carrier USS Midway. Additionally, 12,000 other US troops were deployed to South Korea. The operation went smoothly, with a quiet response by 100-200 North Korean soldiers, as the tree was removed in less than 45 minutes.

    Today, this infamous site is marked by a bronze plaque that sits above a circular concrete pad that is said to be the precise size of the tree they were sent to trim. The inscription on the plaque reads:

    On this spot was located the yellow poplar
    tree which was the focal point of the ax
    murders of two United Nations Command
    officers, Captain Arthur Bonifas and First
    Lieutenant Mark Barret, who were attacked
    and killed by North Korean guards while
    supervising a work party trimming the tree on
    18 August 1976.

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    Nowhere else in the world has this

    by stamporama Written Sep 4, 2011

    It is only in Korea (whether South or North) where the peninsula's division is highlighted and tourists are allowed in given the fact that a state of war still exists. Not even when Germany was divided between East and West did they have a border that was a virtual no-man's land.

    The name says it all The so-called Freedom Bridge The last station before entering the North What everyone hopes for OK, gotta go! Guess where?
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    • Historical Travel

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    Get a Stamp in North Korea

    by DSwede Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    DMZ tours take ~5 hours including transit to/from Seoul.
    Combined DMZ/Panmunjom (JSA) tours take ~8 hours including transit to/from Seoul.

    I did the USO tour a few years ago. It was a great introduction to Panmunjom and the JSA, but did not touch on the other sites in the DMZ.

    Subsequently, I visited from the North side during my tour of DPRK. Needless to say the history lesson and stories one hears are much different. (Panmunjom)

    So I toured again, for the third time doing a joint DMZ/JSA tour and found my experiences to now be much more rounded and complete. The 3rd infiltration tunnel and the JSA in my opinion are the highlights. The "Bridge Of No Return" is seen through the bus windows, but you must have special clearances to get out and see it first hand.

    The other "touristy" thing is that during all my time in DPRK, they would not stamp any documents, nor give me copies of my Visas, so other than the photos that I took there was no proof of my visit. There is a "commemorative stamp" in the Dorasan Station (stopping point on all DMZ tours) that offers an unofficial stamp with the dove of peace and a barbed wire representing DPRK and RoK.

    FYI, Panmunjom & JSA options of the tours are not available Sundays, Mondays or holidays. During those days, only the DMZ portions are available.
    For an example of itinerary & booking company, see: itinerary

    Just do a Google search for one that fits your price, but all tours will hit the same sites.
    west DMZ ~ $45 ~ $50 (3rd tunnel, Dorasan Station, Dora Observatory, Imjingak, Unification Bridge, Freedom Bridge)
    JSA ~ $70 ~ $80 (Camp Bonifas & Ballinger Hall, Bridge of No Return, 1-hole golf course, Freedom House, Conference rooms & "MAC" building)
    Combined ~$130 (all of the above)

    Bridge of No Return
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Kim Dae-jung convention center in Gwangju

    by namhee Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Do you who won the Novel Peace Prize in 2000?

    When South Korean President Kim Dae-jung was presented with the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway, in December 2000, he pledged to dedicate the rest of his life to the reconciliation and cooperation of Korean people.

    Kim Dae-jung convention center is located in Gwangju at the southern area in South Korea.
    It takes only two and half hours from Seoul to Gwangju by KTX, korea Train Express.

    I'm planning of visiting countries that are related with Nobel Peace Prize as my own trip.

    Hope you are having a good trip in Korea.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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