Deoksugung Palace, Seoul

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  • Deoksugung palace, Gwangmyeongmun
    Deoksugung palace, Gwangmyeongmun
    by loja
  • Deoksugung palace
    Deoksugung palace
    by loja
  • 덕수궁 Deoksugung palace
    덕수궁 Deoksugung...
    by loja
  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung

    by iwys Updated May 9, 2005

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    Deoksugung
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    In spite of the fact that Deoksugung (Deoksu Palace) was the only one of Seoul's palaces that was not burned down during the Japanese invasion of 1592, most of its buildings are fairly new, including a neo-classical stone building, designed by a British architect, completed in 1909, which was used as the imperial residence and then housed the national museum. The museum is currently closed and is due to reopen at a new location.

    Deoksugung is more compact than the other palaces and takes less time to walk around.

    Opening hours: March-October 09.00-18.00
    November-February 09.00-17.30
    Last admission one hour before closing

    Admission 1,000 won

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    Deoksu Gung (Palace):

    by mallyak Written Aug 5, 2008

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    Chunghwa-jeon Hall
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    Located in downtown Seoul across the street from City Hall, Deoksu Palace vividly contrasts modern Seoul with traditional Korea. Built during the mid-fifteenth century, it is the smallest of Seoul's palaces. The palace contains many scenic areas and is a favorite among wedding photographers (who can overrun the area on weekdays!). Many local business men and women use the picnic area during lunch as a short escape from the hustle and bustle of downtown life.

    In 1593, after all the royal palaces had been burnt down during the 1592 Japanese invasion, King Sonjo took up temporary residence in a villa which had been built for prince Wolsan (1454-1488). The ruler, King Kwangaegun, named the temporary residence Kyongun-gung. In 1897, King Kojong expanded the palace to make it suitable as the seat of government. King Sunjong later stayed here, renaming it Deoksu-gung (Palace of Virtuous Longevity). This palace includes some of the best examples of royal architecture of the Chosun Dynasty (1392-1910) and has been designated as Historic Site #124 by the central government for preservation and protection. Sokchon-jeon Hall now houses the Royal Museum.

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    Deoksugung

    by bpacker Updated Nov 29, 2004

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    I popped into this place as it was just adjacent to the hotel which I was staying in. Yes, I looked out the window from Koreana HOtel one morning and saw a beautiful cherry tree in full bloom. I went down to take a look and was surprised to find a small palace there.
    Apart from the beautiful rows of cherry trees. there was a musuem, a gigantic bell and the statue of King Sejong and some colourful royal guards. Go to this place only after you have seen the bigger Gyeongbokgung and beautiful Changdeokgung.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung (덕수궁) Palace * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    Deoksugung in downtown Seoul
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    Deoksugung (덕수궁) Palace is across the street from Seoul City Hall and the recently reconstructed Seoul Plaza. It is one of the smaller palaces, but popular due to its location next to City Hall Subway Station. The least impressive features of Deoksugung are the two modern museums in the back of the palace, called Seokjojeon, which really take away from its ambiance.

    Deoksugung was built in the 1400s for King Seongjong's brother Prince Wolsandaegun. King Seonjo made this palace his permanent residence in 1592. King Injo later moved his residence to Changdeokgung, leaving Deoksugung vacant for the next 200 years. In 1897, this palace again became the primary royal residence when King Gojong moved in.

    You enter the palace through the main gate called Daehanmun, and straight ahead is the Geumcheongyo bridge. Further in from the gate in a straight path is the huge bronze statue of King Sejong, and just beyond him is Junghwajeon the main hall of palace. Behind the palace are the modern museum building of Seoul while to the right of the Sejong statue are several buildings from the King Gojong era in the early 1900s.

    Outside of the palace, there is a man who makes signs carved from wood. The signs themselves are impressive, but even more so considering the man has only one hand.

    Here is a photo outside of Deoksugung in the fall.

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  • Hmmmm's Profile Photo

    Deoksu Palace: One of Seoul's newest Palaces.

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Chunmyong-dang where the Queen lived. ADI

    I like Deoksu Gung (Deoksu Palace). Its small, but its right in the centre of the city, right in City Hall. So if you have a spare moment you can duck inside for a breather, and a little serenity.

    Ok the guff: Deoksu Palace vividly contrasts modern Seoul with traditional Korea. Built during the mid-fifteenth century, it is the smallest of Seoul's palaces. The palace contains many scenic areas and is a favorite among wedding photographers (who can overrun the area on weekdays!).

    In 1593, after all the royal palaces had been burnt down during the 1592 Japanese invasion, King Sonjo took up temporary residence in a villa which had been built for prince Wolsan (1454-1488). The ruler, King Kwangaegun, named the temporary residence Kyongun-gung. In 1897, King Kojong expanded the palace to make it suitable as the seat of government. King Sunjong later stayed here, renaming it Deoksu-gung (Palace of Virtuous Longevity). This palace includes some of the best examples of royal architecture of the Chosun Dynasty (1392-1910) and has been designated as Historic Site #124 by the central government for preservation and protection. Sokchon-jeon Hall now houses the Royal Museum.

    The entrance to Deoksugung is teh spectacular Taehanmun Gate. Everyday around 2pm you can watch teh change of the guards. The ceremony is a combination of verbal orders, flags, and musical instruments. It is quite fun to watch. The guards wear traditional costume.

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    Deoksu Gung (bis)

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Sogodang Hall at Deoksu Gung. Pic: ADIrving

    Deoksu Palace contains a plethora of different halls and buildings. The one in the picture is one I like. Its called Sogodang Hall.

    Sogodang Hall is the only two-story building on the palace grounds. It was built by King Sonjo in 1593 to commemorate the Chosun King before him. His widow, the Dowager Queen Inmok led a tragic life confirmed in this building. Destroyed by fire in 1904, Sogodang was rebuilt later the same year. The first floor is 8 kan across the front and 3 kan on the sides. The second floor, which is made of wood, is 6 kan and has a hipped and gabled roof.

    Free of danch'eong* colouring, it has an austere elegance. In 1592, King Sonjo took refuge in Uiju on the Yalu River. He returned to Seoul in 1593, but because every palace lay in ruins, the residence of (Prince) Wolsan-Daegun became his temporary royal abode. Later the building was replaced with Sogodang. Inmok-taebi (the Queen Doweger) was put under house arrest here, and King Kwanghaegun was severely reprimanded by King Injo for his wicked deeds. The present Sogodang is a plain, well-built building that was reconstructed in 1906. Stairs in the western corner lead to the one large hall on the second floor.

    *the brightly coloured patterns that adorn the ceilings, eaves, support pillars, and walls of temple buildings.

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  • Vita500's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung

    by Vita500 Updated Aug 13, 2005

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    Part of Deoksugung Palace in central Seoul

    Originally built in the mid-15th century, it was first used as a royal residence from 1593 since all other palaces had been destroyed in the Japanese invasion.

    It opens from 9am to 6pm from Tuesday - Friday (closes earlier during winter season) and stays open until 7pm over the weekend. Monday is closed!

    Admission: 700.- KRW

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  • schwein's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung

    by schwein Updated Feb 2, 2009

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    Deoksugung
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    The Deoksugung area was originally land and buildings held by decendants of the royal family.

    When all of the palaces in Seoul were destroyed by fire during the Japanese invasion of 1592, King Seonjo used these residential buildings as a temporary palace. They served as palace untill 1611, when King Gwanghaegun moved to Changdeokgung palace.

    Palace grounds were made a park in 1933.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Deoksu Gung

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 11, 2009

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    Deoksu Gung
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    Smaller than the 3 main palaces, this palace near city hall was the last actively used palace where King Gojong died in 1919. It was originally built in 1593 and was updated with modern buildings in 1895. It's the only palace with a mixture of traditional Korean and western buildings.

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  • Christianzagar's Profile Photo

    Deoksugong

    by Christianzagar Written Nov 14, 2006

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    Chungwajeon throne hall
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    one of the many palaces in Seoul. Is situated right across from City Hall. The main entrance (facing city hall )to the palace had recently been renovated. Before the renovation you had to use a side entrance. So maybe thats why many people seem to miss this palace on their travels. Like all the palaces in Seoul it provides a breath of fresh air and an escape from the congested streets. This palace is usually pretty quiet. For me it's most memorable in the fall when the huge trees change colour.
    The National Museum of contemporary Art is also on the palace grounds.

    One of my favourite streets in Seoul is the alley that goes behind Deosugung. To the left of the main entrance is a little street that's great for walks and relaxing. I highly recommend walking around there

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  • shiran_d's Profile Photo

    Deoksu Palace

    by shiran_d Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Palace

    This served as the royal residence for many years after other palaces in Seoul were burned during a Japanese invasion in 1592. The palace's parklike grounds in the middle of downtown contain several halls and pavilions from different eras. Also houses the Royal Museum, where artifacts of the Joseon Dynasty are displayed, including costumes, musical instruments, and artwork. The Royal Guard changing ceremony is Tuesday-Sunday 2-3:30 pm.

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    Deoksugung Palace Guards

    by shiran_d Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Gaurds

    is the smallest of the palaces in Seoul, but it has served as the royal residence twice in its history; once for 15 years after the 1592 sacking of the capital, and again from 1897 to 1907 by King Gojong.

    The change of gaurds

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    Art Gallery

    by schwein Written Feb 2, 2009

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    Deoksugung Art Gallery

    Located at the rear of the Deoksugung compound, in the Seokjojeon area, is a couple of more modern buildings housing art galleries.

    Entrance is included with your admission to Deoksugung. At the time I visited, they were showing art made by Koreans during the Japanese invasion.

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  • qaminari's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung (Palace)

    by qaminari Updated May 17, 2007

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    Junghwajeon Hall
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    This palace is bang in the centre of town, surrounded by modern buildings and office blocks, and contains in its grounds the National Museum of Contemporary Art, housed in the West Wing of Seokjojeon, and part of the Royal Museum.

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  • audspice's Profile Photo

    Deoksugung Palace

    by audspice Written Jan 18, 2013

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    Royal Changing of the Guards (Deoksugung Palace)
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    Deoksugung Palace served as the main palace of the Great Han Empire.

    Be sure to catch the Royal Changing of the Guards Ceremony being held at the Daehanmun Gate. Schedule is 11:00, 14:00 and 15:30. This is held outsiide the gate so it's free.

    The palace opens at 9 am and closes at 9 pm. It is CLOSED on Mondays.

    Admission Fee is KRW 1,000 for adults and KRW 500 for children

    But if you plan to visit all the major palaces, better avail of the Combination Ticket for Palaces.

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