Gyeongbokgung Palace, Seoul

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  • Gyeongbokgung Palace
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  • Gyeongbokgung Palace
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  • snuggie's Profile Photo

    The ceremony of opening & closing of Palace

    by snuggie Written Nov 10, 2007
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    The ceremony was held in Gwanghwanum, Gyeongbokgung. The event is prepared as a means for demonstration of Korea's traditional culture.The ceremony symbolise the act of devotion and was established in the first year of King Yejong (1469).

    The palace gate guide from the Joseon period was responsible for guarding the city gates and the palace in which the king and the royal familes resided. They followed strictly the procedures in opening & closing the gate & the changing of shift to protect the royal court and the nation.

    The performance was held between 10am & 4pm everyday except on Tuesday and at event of rain.

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  • Gryphon25's Profile Photo

    Micro forbidden city

    by Gryphon25 Written Sep 26, 2007

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    You can have a pleasent stroll around Gyeonbokgung. It wasn't that crowded when I went. There are many nooks that you can easily miss. Entrance costs W 1000. You should be able to see most of it in 2 hours. There are many places where you can sit and relax and enjoy the surroundings. Late afternoon is a good time to go. It closes at 5 or 6 pm depending on the seaon. You also have the option of visiting the National Folk Museum.

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    Act like a Princess!

    by cresil Written Jun 4, 2007

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    With the guard.. um... he cant smile!
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    You need a full day to see the whole palace. For me what makes it interesting to visit is because it is very rich in History & a lot ok Korean Dramas were shot here. :O) especially my favotite Princess Hours. Its a must to hire a Hanbok ( Korean National Costume) so that you will actually feel the ambience of the place & feel like a royal! hahaha

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  • qaminari's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung (Palace)

    by qaminari Updated May 18, 2007

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    Geunjeongmun (Gate)
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    I was the only one to turn up for the English tour the day I went, and so had a charming young lady in Korean dress all to myself, although she did insist on interrogating me throughout about the marriage plans of Prince Charles. After explaining the sleeping arrangements of the Korean royal family, which are relevant to the architecture of the palace, she seemed surprised that I didn't know how the British royal family arranged these things...
    Unfortunately when I went the National Museum was closed in preparation for moving, and didn't re-open (near Ichon subway station in Yongsan) until after I had left, in October 2005.

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  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Gyeonbokgung

    by iwys Updated Apr 18, 2007

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    Gyeongbokgung (Gyeongbok Palace) was originally built in 1395, by the Korean architect Jeong Do-jeon. It is the biggest and most spectacular palace in Korea, and Seoul's premier tourist attraction. If you only have time to visit one of Seoul's five palaces, make it this one, as it is a truly magical place.

    Gyeongbokgung was built by King Taejo to be the main palace of the Joseon dynasty. It was burnt down during the Japanese invasion of 1592 and left in ruins until it was restored by King Gojong in 1868. At one time there were 330 buildings in the palace complex. Many of these are being reconstructed. They are currently rebuilding the kitchen area.

    The Korean alphabet, known as Hangeul, was created inside this palace, in the fifteenth century, under the reign of King Sejong.

    The National Folk Museum is next door.

    Opening hours: March-October 09.00-18.00
    November-February 09.00-17.00

    The entrance fee is 3,000 won.

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  • elPierro's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung - Change of Guards

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    Make sure to be around for the change of guards, this is usually performd several times a day from March to November. It includes a lof flags, swords and and drums. The rest you should just check out yourself, but it's very worthwhile seeing.

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    Gyeongbokgung - National Folk Museum

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    On the grounds of Gyeongbokgung there is the National Folk Museum, it's located down the large pagoda (by far the largest sized pagoda I have seen in Korea).

    Inside there are nice displays (bilingual) on the history of Korea ad how people used to live in former days, the exhibits are very nicely made with maquaettes and real sized buildings and objects.

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  • elPierro's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    The old palace of Seoul, Gyeongbokgung is a must see. The palacegrounds are the largest in Seoul and used to consist of some 330 buildings. Unfortunately the Japanese raged the palace, destroying it twice. Nowadays a fair amount of buildings has been rebuild, including the most splendid ones. Included in the entrancefee is also the access to the National Folk Museum which is recommendable and located on the northeastern corner of the grounds.

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    Gyeongbokgung - Genjeongjeon

    by elPierro Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    Most of the grounds consist of the Palacebuilding itself. There's a citygate you go through first, to get on the main square where also the change of guards is performed, then you have to enter 2 gates untll you are on the palace square, behing the palace are also some buildings on which signs explain whatits functions are, and there is a display on they look from the inside.

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  • akikonomu's Profile Photo

    Palace Walk & Museum

    by akikonomu Written Feb 23, 2007

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    Experience the changing of guards ceremony or stroll through the expansive palace grounds.

    Much more interesting is the Folk Museum in the grounds showcasing the daily lifestyle and culture of the Koreans. Interesting videos play the ceremonies and culture of the days gone by.

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  • adnan1977's Profile Photo

    Looking the around

    by adnan1977 Written Dec 21, 2006

    Gyeongbokgung Palace is the primary Palace of Joseon Dynasty and it is the Korea's representative cultural asset. The founder of the palace was King Taejo. King Taejo established the Jaseon Danysty in 1329 and built the palace in 1395. In the 25th year of King Seonjo ( 1592), the pLace was burnt down during the Japanese Invasion and was left ruins for 273 years. Want to know in more detail? just visit it. here are some direction.

    Tickets
    Adult ( 19 - 64 yrs) - 3000 won
    Youth (7 - 18 yrs) - 1500 won
    under 6 and over 55 - Free admission.

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    • National/State Park

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung (경복궁) * * * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 8, 2006

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    Gyeongbokgung ( 경복궁) is the main palace in Seoul and sits in the heart of the city. It was constructed in 1394, but like most other historic sites in Korea, it has been destroyed by the Japanese 2 or 3 times. The pavilion that is surrounded by water on the west side of the palace (called the Gyeonghoeru Pavilion) appears on the back of the Korean 10,000 won note. A key draw at Gyeongbokgung is the changing of the guard ceremony which occurs several times a day.

    Cheong Wa Dae, or the Korean President's "Blue House," sits to the rear of Gyeongbokgung, and on the original grounds of the ancient palace. It was established as the Korean president's residence in 1948. Gyeongbokgung also houses the National Folk Museum which can be visited with the same ticket for the palace.

    When the Japanese occupied Korea, they constructed their governor-general's house in the middle of Gyeongbokgung to show their superiority over the Korean people. After the Japanese departed, the Koreans used this building as their national museum, but it was finally torn down in 1993 to restore the palace to its original glory. Unfortunately this meant the national museum had no home, until the Americans gave up some land at the Yongsan Army Garrison south of Namsan. The new National Museum finally opened around 2005.

    Admittance to Gyeongbokgung is 3,000 Won for foreign adults.

    Each November, there is a re-enactment of the traditional ceremony to pray for a good silk work harvest held at Gyeongbokgung.

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  • Edith49's Profile Photo

    Kyongbokkung Palace

    by Edith49 Updated Nov 9, 2006

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    The Kings throne inside the Palace
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    This is the largest palace in Seoul so I understand. Some areas were being restored when I was there and were closed, but even so, it was still very extensive. We visited on a National Holiday - the Lunar New Year - so there were tons of people and many in traditional dress and many playing traditional games, even though it was bitterly cold.

    I tend to pay more attention to people and things than I do to history so I recommend if you want to know more about the palace, see their official web site for details! I've included the link below. As for me I enjoy the people and the sights, as you will see from my pictures.

    I like to show a different side to places I visit than the pictures that you see on official sites or post cards, so in my pictures you won't see what you see on other sites!

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Kyongbokkung

    by Tom_Fields Written Nov 7, 2006

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    Kyongbokkung Palace
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    This great palace, also spelled "Gyeongbokgung", is the largest of Seoul's five palaces. Lee Seong-Gye, founder of the Joseon Dynasty, built it in 1395. It served as the main royal palace for nearly 200 years. That is, until the Japanese invasion of 1592, when it was burned to the ground.

    In the 1860s, restoration was begun. However, during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century, they were mostly destroyed or moved. The Japanese occupiers also built a huge administration building (the Seokjojeon building) in front of the palace. It was their way of "dissing" the Koreans. After World War II, and Korean independence, it became the National Museum of Korea. Today, that museum is housed in a new building.

    Restoration was resumed recently, and continues to this day. The parts that have been restored are certainly impressive.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung Palace

    by SLLiew Updated Oct 25, 2006

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    This palace is established in 1395 and fine example of Joseon Dynasty architecture.

    It was twice destroyed by the Japanese and rebuilt. Hence epitomize the Korean strength and spirits.

    Open daily closed on Tuesday.

    There is guided tour in Korean, English, Chinese and Japanese.

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