Gyeongbokgung Palace, Seoul

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by muratkorman Written Apr 18, 2010

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    Gyeongbokgung which means Palace Greatly Blessed by Heaven, was built in 1395 and it served as the main palace. After you get the admission ticket (W3000), you can wait in the entrance for the gate guard change or special ceremonies organised during the day. You can also get a guide about these ceremonies to plan your visit. Two of the grandest architectural sights in Seoul are here. The main palace building Geunjeongjeon is an ornate two-storey building. Gyeonghoeru, a large raised pavillion resting on 48 stone pillars, is the second one. This building is located on the left of the main building. On the right is the large living quarters for the primary queen which is called Gyotaejeon. On the eastern side the quarters for the crown prince Jaseondang is located. You can easily spend 3 hours around the Royal Palace. You can also visit National Folk Museum located inside the palace area which will be another tip. Admission hours are between 09:00 and 18:00. The palace is closed on Tuesdays.

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    Gyeonbokgung

    by iwys Updated Apr 18, 2007

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    Gyeongbokgung (Gyeongbok Palace) was originally built in 1395, by the Korean architect Jeong Do-jeon. It is the biggest and most spectacular palace in Korea, and Seoul's premier tourist attraction. If you only have time to visit one of Seoul's five palaces, make it this one, as it is a truly magical place.

    Gyeongbokgung was built by King Taejo to be the main palace of the Joseon dynasty. It was burnt down during the Japanese invasion of 1592 and left in ruins until it was restored by King Gojong in 1868. At one time there were 330 buildings in the palace complex. Many of these are being reconstructed. They are currently rebuilding the kitchen area.

    The Korean alphabet, known as Hangeul, was created inside this palace, in the fifteenth century, under the reign of King Sejong.

    The National Folk Museum is next door.

    Opening hours: March-October 09.00-18.00
    November-February 09.00-17.00

    The entrance fee is 3,000 won.

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    Gyeongbokgung Palace

    by kdoc13 Updated May 23, 2004

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    Gyeonhoeru at the palace complex

    Ok, I get that this is the Palace the Korean people are the most proud of. It is supposed to be the largest most comprehensive and grand. But it was not my favorite one in Seoul. I'll save that one for another page though. Needless to say, this palace would be much more impressive if the Imperial Japanese Army hadn't torn it down and built a command center on the site. This certainly is a sprawling complex though, and it shares its grounds with the Korean National Folk Museum (also another page).

    There were five Palaces of the Chosun Dynasty in Seoul, and like I said, this is the most impressive of them. The best feature of it is Gyeonhoeru. A 2 story pavilion that seems like it is floating on a man made lake. A great way to get a feel for Korean History, should not be missed.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Visit Gyeongbokgog, Seoul's Largest Palace

    by AKtravelers Written Sep 5, 2004

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    15th Century Guards Parade at Gyeongbokgung

    Gyeongbokgong is Seoul's oldest and largest palace, though maybe not it's most important. That's because it was burned down within 1000 years of its construction in the 15th century and remained in ruins until the 19th century. The Choson Dynasty, facing tremendous outside pressure to modernize the nation in the face of Western hegemony in China and Japanese expansion, chose instead to empty its treasury to reconstruct the palace, only to see the Japanese use it as the setting for their colonial capital. So, this place does not have an auspicious history. Still, it is beautiful and should be the first stop on every visitor's list.

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    Palace of the King

    by hindu1936 Written Mar 30, 2006

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    The throne room
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    It was at this palace where the Japanese Ninja assassins killed the queen in 1909 because she was encouraging the king to resist the egregious plots of the Japanese diplomats. The cottage where she was murdered along with her hand maidens is in the far right corner. Near that cottage you will find a garden plot where traditional Korean vegetables are grown. The buildings have been destroyed three times during Japanese invasions, so that not much of what you see is original, but painstakingly restored. In 1995, the Korean people celebrated 50 years of independence from the tyranny of Japan by beginning to remove the Japanese built marble and granite museum from the grounds. It has now been replaced with a museum more in keeping with the traditional building concept.
    In the center of the quad area is one large building surrounded by water. It was here that past kings held dances and parties. It is also here, and in the National Folk Village that many of the scenes for the historic television dramas are filmed.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Geunjungjun - Hall of Diligent Rule ( 4 photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Feb 4, 2006

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    This impressive wooden building on a stone base was the throne room where the Chosun kings conducted their business. This series included one image of the beautiful detail under the eaves and one of papasan and mamasan in traditional dress visiting this national heritage site.

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  • jckim's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung Palace

    by jckim Updated Feb 19, 2005

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    Gyeongbokgung was the primary palace of the Joseon Dynasty. it's built by founder King Taejo. King Taejo established the Joseon Dynasty in 1392 and built the palace in 1395. this palace was burnt king seonjo ( 1592 ) during the Japanese invasion. it was estored of King Gojong(1868). since 1990,the restoration project by the Korean government. ( Historic Site No. 117 )

    Admission Fee : 3000won
    Open : 09:00~18:00
    Closed : Tuesdays

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    Gyeongbokgung (Kyongbuk) Palace (4 photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Jan 10, 2006

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    The signpost placed at the entrance to the palace gives a concise history chronologically but is lacking in historical transparency. For instance, in the 1592 Japanese invasion, the king and his court fled the city ahead of the Japanese. The local citizens were so unhappy with the king's behavior that they burned the palace down, not the Japanese. Reconstruction was delayed for several hundred years because of financial problems and lingering disatisfaction. The new palace was much larger and more opulent than the old. It was built with heavy taxation and was the beginning of the end for the ruling Prince Regent Kojong and his family. In the 1910 annexation, the Japanese destroyed the palace, dismantling and burning or selling parts. In the other images, the amazing Korean Folk Museum is pictured. It features exhibits on Korean history and culture.

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    Hyongwon-Jeong (2 Photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Jan 10, 2006

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    This hexagonal pavilion is one of the most photographed and painted scenes in Korea. A decorative bridge crosses the surrounding lotus pond. Visitors are not allowed unfortunately on the bridge or in the pavilion. This is about as close as one can get - it helps to have a long telephoto lens (second photo).

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  • Gyeongbokgung Palace

    by JDwernychuk Updated May 27, 2004

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    Gyeongbokgung Palace is a massive palace right in the heart of seoul. Really worth seeing. Tickets are a good price to there only 500Won for youth and 1000Won for adults. With that you also get to go into the korean Folk Museum it's a very good meseum. They have english guided tours in palace and the museum. This spot is a #1 if you want to learn about korean history.

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    Gyeongbokgung (경복궁) * * * * *

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 8, 2006

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    Gyeongbokgung ( 경복궁) is the main palace in Seoul and sits in the heart of the city. It was constructed in 1394, but like most other historic sites in Korea, it has been destroyed by the Japanese 2 or 3 times. The pavilion that is surrounded by water on the west side of the palace (called the Gyeonghoeru Pavilion) appears on the back of the Korean 10,000 won note. A key draw at Gyeongbokgung is the changing of the guard ceremony which occurs several times a day.

    Cheong Wa Dae, or the Korean President's "Blue House," sits to the rear of Gyeongbokgung, and on the original grounds of the ancient palace. It was established as the Korean president's residence in 1948. Gyeongbokgung also houses the National Folk Museum which can be visited with the same ticket for the palace.

    When the Japanese occupied Korea, they constructed their governor-general's house in the middle of Gyeongbokgung to show their superiority over the Korean people. After the Japanese departed, the Koreans used this building as their national museum, but it was finally torn down in 1993 to restore the palace to its original glory. Unfortunately this meant the national museum had no home, until the Americans gave up some land at the Yongsan Army Garrison south of Namsan. The new National Museum finally opened around 2005.

    Admittance to Gyeongbokgung is 3,000 Won for foreign adults.

    Each November, there is a re-enactment of the traditional ceremony to pray for a good silk work harvest held at Gyeongbokgung.

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  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Palace with a past -Gyeongbokgung

    by bpacker Updated Nov 2, 2004

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    Gyeongbokgung

    Do a little bit of reading before you visit the palaces of Seoul, if not they will just be another nondescript Chinese architecture to you.
    There's a lot of sad, sad history behind these palace walls.What struck me particulary was the assassination of their queen within the palace walls of Gyeongbokgung. Not only was she killed, her body was badly burnt...you can read more about it over here

    Bpacker's Seoul Page

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  • Hmmmm's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbok Palace: Peace in the Heart of the City.

    by Hmmmm Written Feb 4, 2004

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    Hyangwonjeong, Gyeongbukgung. Photo Aaron Irving

    Gyeongbokgung or Gyeongbok Palace is a gorgeous place to get away a stones throw from Chong No (which is sardine central if you get my meaning). The Architecture is gorgeous, and the natural setting and harmony between the archictecture and the gardens is positively peaceful. I love it there. Especially in the autumn, when its breath taking. Its a favourite place for wedding pictures actually.

    Anyway, some History: Gyeongbokgung Palace was the main residence and palace of the royal family during the Korean Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), and boasts an impressive 600 years of history. Built by King Lee Seonggye (ruled 1392-1398), founder of the Joseon Dynasty, the palace was completed in 1395 after the capital of the nation was changed from Gaeseong to Hanyang (currently Seoul). The huge area of Gyeongbokgung Palace includes the 'Geunjeongjeon', the main hall where official ceremonies took place and government officials could see the King, the 'Gyeonghoeru', where banquets were given for diplomatic reaons, and 'Hyangwonjeong', an artificial island created inside a pond. Also located within the palace is the National Folk Museum, to help further the understanding of the lives of Korea's ancestors.

    Check it out for sure.

    I will make a more indepth travel logue for this palace. later... :o)

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    Gyeongbokgung Palace

    by Carino Updated Dec 12, 2008

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    Check out my Travelogue for pictures and information about this awesome palace!

    Opening Hours:
    March through October: 9am to 6pm
    November through February: 9am to 5pm
    Open until 7pm on Weekends and National Holidays (May to August only).
    Ticket booth will close one hour before closing of the palace.
    Closed on Tuesdays

    Admission:
    3'000 Won (Half price for Kids and Teens from 7 to 18)

    Free Guided Walking Tours:
    English at 11am, 1.30pm and 3.30pm
    Japanese at 10am, 12.30pm and 2.30pm
    Chinese at 10.30am, 1pm and 3pm

    Changing of Guards:
    Every hour from 1oam to 4pm

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  • Vita500's Profile Photo

    Gyeongbokgung

    by Vita500 Updated Jan 28, 2006

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    Korea's largest pavilion within Gyeongbokgung

    Built in 1395 as residence for the royal family as well as seat of the government. It was destroyed in 1592 and only restored in 1865. After further destruction during the Japanese colonisation, a reconstruction program was launched in 1995.

    As it's one of the most frequently visisted palaces of Seoul, try to avoid the weekends when the place is pretty crowded out with tourists and locals alike.
    ---

    Open daily except Tuesday.
    Admission: 700.- KRW

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