South Korea Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Ewingjr98
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Ewingjr98
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Ewingjr98

South Korea Warnings and Dangers

  • Other Stuff

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    I needed to use a public restroom in an underground metro station/shopping center. I go into the stall and there are no seat covers. Eh, I can live with that. I'll just put toilet paper down on the seat....WHAT no toilet paper! I get out of the stall and see a toilet paper dispenser on the wall. Cost is 500 WON. So, I run out to yell at my...

    more
  • Health & Well-Being

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    When you wake up at 5.00am with a blocked runny nose and itchy throat you haven't had for years and wished you had brought along a nasal decongestant spray, that's a bad indicator of not just Seoul's infamous air pollution but your dust mite allergy acting up! :( Which means the floor carpeting vacuuming wasn't thorough or strong enough though I...

    more
  • Language Barrier

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    Due to the imperfect nature of translating Korean writing into romanized characters, you will find a lot of confusing variation in place names. For instance "G" and "K" seem to be used interchangably and what is spelled with a G on map might be spelled with a K on signs. An example is that Gyeonbok Gung palace is alternatively known as Kyongbok...

    more
  • Shopping & Money

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    Getting money can be a big problem sometimes. Many ATM's don't accept foreign cards, even a VISA card logo does not guarantee your VISA will be accepted. Many banks don't offer the service. Usually the airport and Central Station have 1 or mor ATM's who can provide you with money but it's no guarantee. My best advise, find out where you can get...

    more
  • Protests

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    Seoul has frequent protests throughout the city, usually at the US military bases, the US embassy, or the Korean ministry of defense. Occasionally these protests will get violent, such as when the president was impeached in March 2004. You would probably be safest if you avoid these gatherings. Say no to US cows no matter what they say to you.

    more
  • Driving et al

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    In addition to some of the various other rules you might see in Seoul or other areas, beware that buses are on a schedule and stop lights, signs and various traffic controllers do not apply to them. They will make left turns around other traffic stopped at a stop light from the right turn lane, et al. Terminator trucks, ditto. These are 4 axle (or...

    more
  • Weather

    Seoul Warnings and Dangers

    Bring an umbrella for any time of the year. Even in the summer it can provide you with shade. Alot of Koreans use them here. You can buy one here also. They are most useful. It's hot hot hot in the summer and cold cold in the winter w/ rain and mild weather in between.

    more
  • The squatters and dirty washrooms

    Although South Korea is becoming more Westernized, there are still a lot of the more traditional toilets that Asia is known for in restaurants or on the street; especially in rural areas. There are many in cities too. Now, the squatting part isn't really what bothers me, its how dirty some of the bathrooms are and the fact that many of them do not...

    more
  • Silence rule on public transit

    For an unexplainable reason, it is quite frowned upon in Korea to talk at a normal volume on public transit. Whispering is ok, but if they can hear you, its not. Any laugher will invite dirty looks or someone coming up to tell you off. Most Koreans sit quietly on the bus/metro, if they're not playing on their iphones or other gadgets then their...

    more
  • Acommon1 SAFE JOURNEY ANYWHERE

    Common sense Acommon Travel rules as to where ever you go.#1. Don't go where you shouldn't go.#2. Follow the rule of law in the country that you reside.#3. Adhere to the rule of law from your home country.#4. Respect and "pre-" read up on the culture(s).#5. Gain some familiarity with the country's national language prior to your trip.#6. Practice...

    more
  • No Smoking! (Well, Almost)

    On July 1, 2003 Korea (maybe it was just Seoul, but I think all of Korea) entered a brave new world: one without smoking in offices or many public places. There was a full marketing push and signs were put up in all buildings (including in bathrooms and stairwells) giving notice to all puffers to take it outside.Unfortunately, it hasn't worked 100%...

    more
  • Pharmacies, Clinics and Hospitals (pt.1)

    (I'm putting these in Warnings because most people only go to these places if something is wrong.)Pharmacies: There are some pretty big differences between Korean and Western Pharmacies. One is that you cannot get asprin, foot powder or Tinactin without a prescription (if at all, see story in website link, about 1/2 way down). (You can, however,...

    more
  • Mid Summer is Typhoon Season

    Where I come from rain falls in cold, bracing drops for days on end sometimes. In Seoul, however, rain seems to come down in blankets, for relatively short stints and it's kind of welcome. This is because the main rainy season here is in the mid-Summer, especially July, and it's kind of a relief from the heat. (Humidity at that time goes from 99%...

    more
  • Sand Storms from the Gobi Desert

    The problem with a phenonemon named "hwangsa" is getting more severe in South Korea. "Hwangsa" is the yellow sand which is blown into South Korea from the Gobi desert. The problem has increased in the past two decades, as the desert regions in China and Mongolia are getting bigger year by year - not just because of global warming but also very much...

    more
  • Food you dont want to eat - dogs and...

    Gaigogi literally means dog meat in Korean. "Gai" means dog, and "gogi" means meat. Many dogs are raised and bread exclusively for their meat here, even though I've heard that this practice has actually been illegal here for a while. It still goes on. There are some dog meat shops here in Busan where I'm living. Its sad but true...Sannakji is also...

    more
  • fake goods

    there are so many fake goods for sale here almost everywhere, if you are a purest like me, then only buy goods from branded shores. Your canon camera was made in Thailand or Vietnam, the quarnatee is invalid.

    more
  • Don't Purchase Counterfeit Merchandise!

    This did not happen to me but I thought I would post it since it was on the news the other day. U.S. customs, upon re-entry to the country, will inspect your purchases. If you bought a watch, purse, DVD, etc. and it is not authentic (from the true manufacturer), they will take it from you. Something to keep in mind.

    more
  • Do's and Don'ts

    Do use both hands when giving something to a Korean.Do pour drinks for others and allow them to pour for you - it's impolite to pour your own drink.Don't blow your nose in public or at meals - Koreans find it disgusting. If the need arises, slip off to the restroom or find another private spot.Do plan on being either the guest or the host if dining...

    more
  • guard your belongings

    Even when you think that the door to your room is locked at night when you hae retired , the bell hops can be bought very easy. keep your things close to you even at night as they will(bad guys) try and come into your room to steal. The clubs in the hotels(Budget ones where you try and say a few$'s) have more than their share of women of the...

    more
  • protesting...

    There were alot of people protesting the americans being in south korea, and everyone was advised to stay as far away from these demonstrations as possible because they could turn ugly fast, other then that you should follow same safety procautions that you would in the states, ie dont keep all your money in your purse, dont carry your passport...

    more
  • Where to walk safely?

    Pedestrians here have no right of way. Drivers do not stop at zebra crossings and not all of them stop on red light. Sidewalks are sometimes dangerous too. Motorbikes delivering food don't run on roads. They choose to run on sidewalks instead and dodge people.

    more
  • Confusing City Names

    Getting around in South Korea you should better know how to read the Korean Script. There are many, many cities with a very similar sounding name: Kwangju, Kyongju, Kongju, Chonju... The only way to know for certain, where you are going, is to be able to read your ticket. I once mixed up Chonju with Chongju, which meant a detour of about two hours....

    more
  • Unsafe Driving

    Driving in rural Korea can be a life-threatening experience, particularly in the mountainous northeastern areas. Narrow one-lane winding roads can lead to dangerous situations as depicted in the accompanying photographs. Do note the red material on the front of the truck below the driver's windscreen. The last picture is from a separate incident.

    more
  • Driver arrogance

    If you decide to risk your life here by driving, absolutely do not move into traffic just because your light turns green. I have seen as many as 17 cars run one red light. I have yet to see a red light that everyone stopped for if there was any chance at all that they could get across before the green traffic moved. Korea is the number one country...

    more
  • Seoul - Air Pollution

    Seoul and Gyeonggi-Do province, metro Seoul, account for nearly half of Korea total population and approaches 20 million people. As any other large city in the world, pollution is an issue. Urban surface public transportation system is slowly converting to natural gas operated vehicles, but you can imagine the amount of high-polluting vehicle...

    more
  • Korea - Language and Transcription

    Korean language, Han-Kuk-Eoh, is classified into the Ural-Altaic group.Contrary to general belief, it's not like Chinese or Japanese but it's written using the Hangul alphabet composed of 24 basic letters, which was first introduced around AD 1450 under King Sejong.My command of Korean language is scarce, but knowing how to read and pronounce is of...

    more
  • Driving in the Mountains

    Local mountain roads can be tricky.Steep roads with many curves with lesser visibility.During and after rain often there are spots with mud and gravel; even big rocks can come down.The ultimate challenge are the unpaved mountain roads. One time I ended up at a dead end and all I could do was going into reverse with a "mighty" look-off view next to...

    more
  • Not-So-Excellent Street Snacks

    I already made tips on Excellent Street Snacks I, II and III, so it's time for the other side.Actually, I have an aversion to anything from a 포장마차/po-jang-ma-cha (literally: covered wagon, where they make a tent-restaurant out of a truck). Some of the worst offenders are sold right on the street, as you'll read below.(i)...

    more
  • North Korean Attack

    Yes, it can happen. North and South Korea are still technically AT WAR. They only signed an armistice, not a peace treaty. There is no peace here.However, there are 37,000 US troops (some of whole I know and let me tell you, they are ready to go into action at a moment's notice) and about a 500,000 (maybe it's 700,000) strong ROK (Republic of...

    more
  • Few Violent Crimes in Seoul - Korea

    Unlike many Western cities, Seoul (and the rest of Korea) has few violent crimes (and almost none involving firearms, as only police and military have them). Also, as a foreigner you're more likely to be attacked by another foreigner than by a Korean (unless, of course, you like to live dangerously and bad-mouth everyone you see). Most Koreans view...

    more
  • Like to Spit, Belch, Fart and Pee in the...

    Ok, Koreans are not as bad (as I hear, at least, as those in China who hock-a-loog wherever they may be and have their kids pee on the floor in the restaurants (ya, these are real stories). But, to those of us with genteel sensibilities it could be off-putting.It's usually 아저씨/a-jeo-sshi (middle-aged men, like me!) who are the...

    more
  • You Too Can Have Your Very Own Stalker

    If you've been in Korea long enough (from one week to one year) and you're an ok-looking white male you'll probably end up with a stalker at some point (heck, even I did!). A bud of mine got one within a week of his coming here (he was a strapping-good-looking Dutch lad) and another (a Taiwanese guy from the States) got one within a few hours of...

    more
  • Watch Your Voltage!

    Korea's power is 220 volts, and the plugs are round with 2 round prongs, not flat ones like in North America. Some hotels and newer buildings have North American outlets but many of the older ones have the Korean ones.If you have electronics I'd advise you to first: check with the hotel staff or owner if you can safely plug in your North American...

    more
  • Pharmacies, Clinics and Hospitals (pt.2)

    (I'm putting these in Warnings because most people only go to these places if something is wrong.)Clinics: Korea is full of surprises. The first time I got food poisoning here (it's happened twice in 18 months) I was escorted to a famous gastronomic clinic. (If you think you know what is wrong with you you can go straight to the specialist here: no...

    more
  • Mosquitos

    In most hotels these pests won't be a problem...but in my place, and many homes, there are so many cracks for them to get in through that I had to invest in a mosquito repellant thingy. (No idea what the real name is.) It heats an oil, creating a vapour that (apparently) is harmless to humans but takes care of the mosquito problem quite well.They...

    more
  • Yellow Wind/Dust

    The Gobi Desert in Mongolia is apparently growing. The effects, however, are wide-reaching. As the winds flow west to east a yellow cloud moves across Mongolia and China. This cloud, although not all that appealing, is not as damaging as it becomes when it reaches Korea. You see, as the dust flies over the humid West Sea bacteria, mold and fungi...

    more
  • Getting a Haircut in Seoul/Korea

    It's not as easy as it may seem. Although the hairdressers here all have training from technical school (where they learn everything from how to hold a comb to dying and other effects) and you can walk into a local salon anytime and get a cut (especially if you're a guy), actually getting the trim is the tough part.The main problem is language. I...

    more
  • Speak Slowly and in Simple Sentences

    Impossible as it may seem in a country that has 99.9% literacy and kindergarden English classes, you must brace yourself for the possibility that almost every Korean you meet will know little English.In business meetings, casual conversations or various service capacities (driver, waiter) many Koreans cannot follow English sentences. More tough is...

    more
  • The Streets are Alive with the Sound of...

    Well, not really. There is not much honking in Seoul, but there are A LOT of cars. And Koreans seem to love to drive--on the major holidays the roads (and trains) are packed but you can get a plane ticket pretty easily...odd.Anyways, cars rule here. They can drive as they like and they are usually parked on the sidewalks in many areas. Some streets...

    more
  • Bank Machines in Korea

    A few things to keep in mind when travelling here:1. Bank machines are closed from about 11:30PM - 8AM. (I think this is to promote the use of credit cards, but it can get real frustrating if you need cash for something.)2. Although there are many bank machines and 'foreign' bank machines in town I have yet to go to one and have my friends get any...

    more
  • Pharmacies, Clinics and Hospitals (pt.3)

    (I'm putting these in Warnings because most people only go to these places if something is wrong.)Hospitals: Perhaps there is a reason for having funeral chapels in the basements of the hospitals here in Korea: because once you're in there maybe you won't get out. I'm not saying that Korean hospitals are lax in their care, it is just an interesting...

    more
  • A few words about Korean public toilets.

    1. There are 2 kinds: Western/throne and Asian/hole-in-the-floor. Most places have both, but some have one or the other. Most newer buildings have just the Western style (which is fine by me). To use the 'hole' squat facing the 'hood' (men, you'll figure out why there is a hood in about 2 seconds). Some say it is anatomically more correct to...

    more
  • Korean Police

    In the US police officers speak English as well as (maybe) Spanish. In Canada they speak English and some French. In Korea they speak Korean....period. Well, not quite; some may have KATUSA (Korean Army Training with US Army) training which gives them some ability--but by and large don't expect ANY English from a Korean police officer.Police cars...

    more
  • Motorcycles, Motorcycles Everywhere

    One thing you'll notice here is the motorcycles (and the fact that pitifully few of their riders and passengers wear helmets--don't get me started on having KIDS with no helmets on these things).They drive on the roads, sidewalks, crosswalks...anywhere. Usually they go slowly where warranted (like in a crowd of people) but even having them around...

    more
  • Parking and Parking Lots in Korea

    First, a warning. If you're walking down a sidewalk and hear dull bell/alarm sound (similar to the recess bell at school) and see a revolving red light be on the lookout for a car. Since space is at a premuim here, most underground parking lots open right onto (busy) sidewalks and the alarm and light is set off my a motion sensor a little ways down...

    more

South Korea Hotels

See all 536 Hotels in South Korea

Top South Korea Hotels

Seoul Hotels
3052 Reviews - 7535 Photos
Busan Hotels
306 Reviews - 761 Photos
Jeju (city) Hotels
47 Reviews - 121 Photos
Incheon Hotels
56 Reviews - 178 Photos
Daegu Hotels
41 Reviews - 93 Photos
Suwon Hotels
115 Reviews - 305 Photos
Ulsan Hotels
22 Reviews - 47 Photos
Anyang Hotels
See nearby hotels
Waegwan Hotels
See nearby hotels
Uijongbu Hotels
See nearby hotels
Kyongju Hotels
189 Reviews - 495 Photos
Gwangju Hotels
26 Reviews - 49 Photos
Yangyang Hotels
5 Reviews - 16 Photos
Tanyang Hotels
43 Reviews - 278 Photos
Taejon Hotels
18 Reviews - 38 Photos

Instant Answers: South Korea

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

95 travelers online now

Comments

South Korea Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of South Korea warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for South Korea sightseeing.
Map of South Korea