Taiwan Local Customs

  • Dandan Noodles
    Dandan Noodles
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Local Customs
    by deeper_blue
  • Local Customs
    by deeper_blue

Taiwan Local Customs

  • Temple Etiquette

    I'll state now that I don't know too much about temple etiquette- this is just a little bit of what I learned from the locals in Taiwan. If you note any mistakes or would like to add something, feel free.1. If there is more than a single entrance to a temple (usually there are three), never take the main entrance. The Chinese say that you must...

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  • Taiwanese currency

    For history, the "New Taiwan Dollar" was issued to replace the "Old Taiwan Dollar" in 1949 due to hyperinflation. The replace rate was 1 NTD = 40,000 TD.Prior to that, Taiwan was under Japanese rule and the currency was Taiwan Yen. Now you know a bit of the currency history....Exchange Rate:100 New Taiwan Dollar = USD 3.02Coins: NT$1, $5, $10, $50...

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  • Qingtianbaizhimandihong

    The flag of the Republic of China (as well as an emblem seen many places across the Republic) is the Qingtiangbaizhimandihong (the Chinese equivalent of Stars and Stripes, except with a different design and a much longer name). Qingtianbaizhimandihong literally translates as "Blue sky with a white sun on a land of red" (red refering more to the...

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  • What year is it?

    The Republic of China usually does not use the western system of numbering years (1,2,3...2005,2006), but instead has it's own system. In the Republic of China, most years are stated as ming-gou (insert the year), which literally means, in the year of the Republic. Year 1 was 1911, the founding of the Republic of China, and 2006 was Ming-gou 95...

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  • National Day

    National Day or Double Ten Day is the last most important festival of the year in Taiwan. Double Ten Day observes the anniversary of the October 10 1911 revolution which led to the defeat of the dishonest Ching (Manchu) Dynasty and the Republic of China. The day is celebrated with impressive parades in front of Taipei's Presidential Office Building...

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  • Money

    Major credit cards are accepted and traveller's cheques may be cashed at some tourist-oriented businesses and by room guests at most international tourist hotels. ATM card machines in Taiwan usually need a 6 digit pin number. Try not to carry a large amount of cash.

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  • Superstitions

    Four is considered an unlucky number in Chinese culture, because in spoken language the words for four and death sound similar. Consequently, foreigners are given addresses and phone numbers littered with fours because no one else wants them (an easy way to figure out your hotel room number).Colors are also very important to know. For instance,...

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  • How to Tip in Taiwan

    Before I went to Taiwan I tried to be as prepared as possible for cultural differences and customs. I thought I was fairly ready for anything I might encounter, but I was a bit startled when I tried to tip a reflexology therapist and they refused. I looked at the therapist with a confused expression on my face and saw a slightly confused and...

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  • During Chinese New Year

    What do most Taiwan people do during Chinese New Year? On the first day, many go to a temple to pray for a better life in the following year. In Taipei, the most famous and most popular temple goes to "Lung Shan temple" , you can approach it by MRT.Please visit my Taipei travelogue for more pics.

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  • Gan Bei Anyone who has...

    Gan BeiAnyone who has attended a Chinese banguet knows the resounding chant of Gan Bei . It is the traditional toast of the Chinese dinner party . The host usually begins the dinner by toasting his guest or guests who are seated in the place of honour facing the door ; while the host is across the table with his back to the door . Throughout the...

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  • a march on a god's birthday (cheng huang...

    it was held on every may 17th of lunar calandar at my town, every family gotta do the tradition like "bai-bai" for a couple of days,and on that day, there's martch around the whole town, some people are as guards,and some are as other gods,and kids are made up as ancient generals,servers,and different roles, they sit on lots of benches which r...

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  • Crazy Fun Firecrackers Fest

    It's held in a small town called Yen-suieh (Salty Water), located north of Kaohsiung, in Tainan County, where there is a firecrackers festival going on annually. Originally, the villagers set off the firecrackers as rewards to the gods they believe in for the prosperity and fortune they brought in. The more they earned, the more firecrackers they...

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  • God Money

    On my first trip to Taiwan and on the first night I noticed quite a lot of metal bins out side shops. Inside the bins was smouldering ashes. As time went on I learnt that the bins was for burning God Money. God Money is not real money but a kind of childs play money...the money is symbolic rather than of value. You will see people burning huge...

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  • Stuffed Like A Pig

    When visiting anyone it will be standard practise for them to feed and water you.....you can not escape with out eating........even if you say you are full...or feel ill, you will still have food thrust upon you.When you think you have eaten a respectable amount, more food will arrive and more and more and more......Be prepared for this....the...

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  • Entering some ones house.

    When entering some ones house it is polite for you to take your shoes off before you actually go inside.....some people will say it is ok for you to leave on.......best thing is to take them off. Your host will usually provide you with some flip flops or slippers to wear in the house.The same rule applys to a lot of temples too.....if you are not...

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  • Essential tips

    Compared to England, Taiwan does seem to have quite a few customs that are widely respected by all.The people are so freindly and understanding, even if theyhave no idea what you are saying, they will allow for mistakes that you might make and have a huge understanding that we do not fully realise the meaning behind the customs and traditions.This...

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  • Fireworks

    Don`t be surprised for the sound during the day. Taiwanese people loves to use fireworks for everything. During our staying almost everyday we had to struggle with it...all of the sudden, god knows from where all these people showed up in the middle of the streets appareantly in a political parade using this fireworks and lots of other goodies.It...

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  • Betel nut - the local "chewing gum"

    It is a very strange habit that people (especially men) are chewing a kind of nut called "betel nut" so you can see some guys with their mouth all red ... (funny) ... but the best part of it is the places where they sell these nuts. In the city there are normal food stands those are selling betel nuts as well but outher the city ... especially near...

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  • Karaoke

    In Taiwan, karaoke bars are very popular and very common. (We didn't go to one, though.)The Chinese for `karaoke' is `kalaokay'. Not too surprising.However, it is spelt # * O KWhere `#' and `*' represent ideograms pronounced `ka' and `la', resepctively.Sometimes the sign is printed from the other side, as it were, so that it reads K O *...

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  • Catching a bus

    Although they are numbered, it is still not easy unless you read and speak Chinese, they are also usually very crowded..

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  • Ghost Money

    Ghost Money: A local variant on Monopoly money, which is burned on certain auspicious dates as an offering to whatever spirits may be lurking about.

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  • Fengshui

    This literally means the wind and the water, although a more accurate definition would be to be in harmony with your surroundings. If something bad happens to you, not to worry, for it is not your fault. It is just that you fengshui needs adjustment. (Moving the furniture around may even remedy the problem...)Before any new building is occupied,...

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  • Red Bombs

    A gift given by a person when they announce their intention to get married. This gift obligates you to reciprocate with a cash gift at the wedding party. Dubbed a "Red Bomb" since the gift is invariably wrapped in red, and the consequence of opening the package is not favorable. These are to be avoided at all costs....

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  • Superstitions

    The Taiwanese are quite a superstitious lot. Some of the more common superstitions include the following: Never wrap gifts in white paper, as white is the color representing death here. (red would be a better choice) It is also best to avoid the number 4, since the Chinese pronunciation of "four" is the same as the word for "death". (Many buildings...

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  • Local food in open air market

    Food is very important in Chinese culture. Open air markets are everywhere. Contrairely to the Canadian culture where food is kept almost uniquely in inside supermarket that are sterile, wide and very westernized.When being in Taiwan, open air market are a must to visit. A place to see local people shop around as part of their routine shopping.

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  • The dragon dance

    the dragon dnace?!well.....this translation might be sorta weirdanyways it's a famous chinese traditional activityit's most been seen during the chinese year new year

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  • Lungshan Temple,Taipei

    there are many temples in Taiwan,Lungshan temple is a famous one (though i 've never been there )maybe foreign celebraties always visit there when they come to Taiwanon one hand ,u can know more about our religion and cultureon the other hand ,u can enjoy one of the chinese traditional architectures !!!

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  • The Temple Fair in Pao-an Temple

    there are really many temple fairs in each temple,and usualy with special and unique activies to show our respect for them,it's hard to explain what the activies are like,but as long as u visit them in person,u'll have great impression on them!

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  • never bored with its history

    It's always good to know Taiwan's history, but becuase of those historical figure, but the history which is really long long ago - the life 9 origins and the development of Taiwan from these aborigins.

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  • Weather

    Taiwan's climate is subtropical, with average annual temperatures of 21C (71F) in the north and 24C (75F) in the south. The rainy season is in May and June. Summers, which last from May through September, are usually hot and humid with daytime temperatures from 27C to 35C (80's and 90's F). .Winters, from December through February, are short and...

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  • There are aboriginal tries...

    There are aboriginal tries near Shei-pa National Park. Don't worry, just greet them with your big smile.

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  • The Ami are Taiwan's largest...

    The Ami are Taiwan's largest aboriginal tribe, living mostly in the eastern region. The tribe has a strict age-based hierarchy; upon reaching manhood, an Ami male enters a social order in which he is ranked according to age. The Ami worship nature, and hold numerous rites and ceremonies, the most important being the Prayer for an Abundant Harvest.

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  • It's the Taiwan Flag. The...

    It's the Taiwan Flag. The capital city is Taipei. The population is about 22.3 million. By the way, Taiwan is the first democratic republic in Asia. We have our own culture and freedom in this small country. I personally do not think that Taiwan is a part of China, though it's a complex politics issue.

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  • Temples, taoisticke alebo...

    Temples, taoisticke alebo budhisticke chramy su cez vikendy plne ludkov tuziacich po splneni ich najtajnejsich tuzob a zelani.Pao an temple je taoisticky chram v Taipei, hned v jeho blizkosti sa nachadza Confucius temple.

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  • It's great if you can attend a...

    It's great if you can attend a traditional Chinesse wedding. Thank's again to my friend Sonia(bridesmade) and Jane (bride) that invited me there.

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  • If you so dare, try the local...

    If you so dare, try the local betelnut available at many roadside stands.Betel nut are psychoactive, but there's a trick: the nuts need to be chewed with a small amount of agricultural lime. The lime makes the compound active as it does with coca leaves

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  • Politics. Currently the...

    Politics. Currently the Taiwanese are crazy about politics. Many people ask me what's going on between Taiwan and China and all the big deal. Here is some historical info that China doesn't want people to know, and many Taiwanese themselves don't even know because of 40+ years of brain-washing under Chiang's government. After reading this, perhaps...

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  • The Chinese are very proud and...

    The Chinese are very proud and have a strong desire to not loose 'face', ie, they don't want to be made fools of in public, so arguing, getting abusive, etc. is a VERY ineffective technique for getting what you want!

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  • Learn at least a few words of...

    Learn at least a few words of Mandarin.Sheshe = thank youNihao = helloTsai Chen = goodbyePubu = waterfall (like the one in the photo in Wulai)

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  • During Ghost Month, the...

    During Ghost Month, the spirits roam the earth and for this reason, the Taiwanese do not like to travel at this time. Offerings of food are made at the temples and ghost money is burned (see photo) to placate the spirits.

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  • Taiwan MovieMaybe you saw...

    Taiwan MovieMaybe you saw Taiwan Movie before or not . Do you want to know more ? Click here to know basic about Chinese Movie Chinese Movie Data

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  • LanguageAlmose Taiwaner speak...

    LanguageAlmose Taiwaner speak Mandarin and Taiwanese . They are quite different ! Even Mandarin , you will find Chinese and Taiwaner speak and write by different way ! If you interested learning Mardarin in Taiwan , below are infomation about it . Many people study English since 12-year-old ( now many children study English when they were...

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  • Do you want to know more about...

    Do you want to know more about Taiwan music , click here

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  • for ppl who's first time visit...

    for ppl who's first time visit here, when u wanna get sth to eat on the streets from venders, tell him or her want u want first, cuz they might not ask u'May I help u' or sth like that esp when they'r busy, if u didn't say anything, they might consider u'r still thinking and havn't decide yet, so speak out lound and get what u wanna eat!

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  • STRANGERS ASKING PERSONAL...

    STRANGERS ASKING PERSONAL QUESTIONS:I had many funny experiences in Taiwan, where complete strangers would ask me personal questions. I am not sure whether they were practicing their english, or genuinely being friendly. One day, a complete stranger came into an elevator and she just blurted out - 'Are you married?'. I asked some locals about it,...

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Taiwan Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Taiwan local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Taiwan sightseeing.
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