Presidential Building, Taipei

3.5 out of 5 stars 13 Reviews

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    Presidential Building
    by shavy
  • Presidential Building
    by cal6060
  • Presidential Building
    by cal6060
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    The Presidential Office Building

    by cal6060 Updated Jan 15, 2014
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    The Presidential Office Building is truly remarkable in the city of Taipei. It is the president's office and also opened to the public to learn the history of the building, the former governor's-general, the presidents of Taiwan, and the country with free in-house tour guide. Don't miss!

    It was first built in 1919 as the Governor-General's Office at the time during Taiwan was under Japanese colonial period. The building was built and designed by a Japanese architect, Uheiji Nagano. It has typical Japanese colonial style architectural building with the blend of European designs including Renaissance, Baroque and neo-Classical. It faces east in general as most of the Japanese Official Building.

    During the War World II, the building was heavily boombed by the Allied Powers until the Japanese surrendered.

    In 1950, the building was finally restored by Chen Yi, the Governor General of Taiwan Province and was used as the Presidential Office after the ROC defeated in the civil war in mainland China, which they moved their Presidential Palace in Nanjing to Taipei.

    Click here for more information.

    Opening Hours: 9:00 - 12:00 (Weekday)

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    • Architecture

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    The Presidential Office Building

    by shavy Updated Aug 29, 2013
    Presidential Building

    The building is located on Chongqing S. Road and facing Ketagalan Boulevard, The Presidential Building was announced by the President as "national historical site" in 1998 and was open for public tour since then
    The general public will be able to see in person the location where the president works
    There is are tour offer on weekdays, booking in advance is recommended

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    Presidential Palace Offices

    by DSwede Updated Aug 7, 2010

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    Presidential Palace Office
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    Open to the public only on limited times, the Presidential Palace offers an intimate way to see Taiwan's governmental seat and the historical evolution of the island's government.

    During the tour, the guides give informative descriptions of the rooms, corridors and decorations. At the end of the tour, around the perimeter of the courtyard, there are many signs, placards and information posts that give the history of Taiwan's government. It starts with the local chairs, the Japanese influence during the occupation, then the modern ROC.

    Direct from "Office of the President" website, visiting hours are:
    Monday ~ Friday : 9am to 12noon (partial building open) (must register before 11:30am)
    Sundays : 8am to 4pm (full building open) only offered ~4 times per year *
    * example = one Sunday in each February / May / August / November
    * check website for Sunday dates. Click link for "Tours & Art Gallery"

    Groups of 6 or more need reservations 10 days in advance. Less than 6 need no reservations. Security reserves the right to inspect passport and documents, so it is advised to bring these with you.

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    National Taiwan Democracy Hall

    by aukahkay Written Dec 14, 2007

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    The new inscriptions on the Gate of Centrality
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    The National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall is a monument erected in memory of Chiang Kai-shek, former President of the Republic of China. A new name for the structure, National Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall was announced by President Chen Shui-bian on 19 May 2007. At the entrance to the Memorial Park, the Gate of Great Centrality and Perfect Uprightness (‘å’†ŽŠ³) is a magnificent gate. The words ‘å’†ŽŠ³ contains two characters of the name of Chiang Kai-shek (’†³).

    On Dec. 6 2007, the Memorial Hall was closed to the public at 9am for three days by order of the Ministry of Education to facilitate the replacement of the inscription on the main gate. The new inscriptions read Democracy Square. Pro-democracy supporters held a vigil at the Memorial Hall supporting the Ministry's decision while other groups of people protested the replacement of the inscription as they saw it as downplaying the legacy of Chiang Kai-shek. Kuomintang presidential candidate Ma Ying-jeou (”n‰p‹ã) said at a separate setting that he would undo any removal or name change to the hall if he was elected President in 2008.

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    National Day

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 26, 2006

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    National Day or Double Ten Day is the last most important festival of the year in Taiwan. Double Ten Day observes the anniversary of the October 10 1911 revolution which led to the defeat of the dishonest Ching (Manchu) Dynasty and the Republic of China. The day is celebrated with impressive parades in front of Taipei's Presidential Office Building and the other events involve folk dances, dragon and lion dances, acrobatics and exhibits of marital arts.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    Presidential Building

    by chewy3326 Written Aug 17, 2006

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    Presidential Building

    I have never been inside the Presidential Building of the ROC, though I have seen it from the outside, and I do know that tours are offered. The Presidential Building has a distinctly Western look and feel, which helps you recognize that it was constructed by the Japanese during their occupation of Taiwan. Currently (August 2006), the president of the ROC has gotten himself into a rather uncomfortable situation, and everything concerning the president has become a touchy subject.

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    Presidential Palace

    by lhe Updated Jan 3, 2005

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    Presidential Palace

    This building was built during the Japanese occupied period and served as the Governer's House. Ever since the Japanese's retreat, it became the office of the president (the current president is Chen Shui-bian). It is open for public visiting every weekday morning from 9 to 12. They often decorate the building during October 10 (Taiwan's National Day) and have a parade in front of the building.

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  • dixonchan's Profile Photo

    Taiwan Presidential Building

    by dixonchan Written Nov 20, 2004
    Taiwan Presidential Building

    Take a look at the workplace of Taiwan's president Chen Shui Bian.

    Walk along the wide road that once staged a major protest during the March 20th presidential election whereby Mr Chen won "controversially".

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    Presidential Office Building

    by mim95 Updated Sep 22, 2003

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    Presidential Office Building, Taipei

    The Presidential Office Building has been standing since 1919. And it has always been the office for the head of state since Japanese occupation.

    It is a grand building, especially when you look at it from the 10-lane boulevard leading to the building.

    We didn't get a chance to go inside (there are tours offer on weekdays, but you need to book in advance).

    No camera is allowed during the weekday tours.

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  • sunnywong's Profile Photo

    Presidential Office Building (chinese: Á`²Î©²)

    by sunnywong Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Presidential Office Building faces the massive East Gate, one of five built as part of Taipei's original city wall. Built in the period of occupation by the Japanese, and at that time named the Supreme Office, every year at New Year and on national holidays there are parades, folk art demonstrations and other entertainment in the plaza in front of the building.

    Partial Opening Every Week: Mondays to Fridays, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m.

    Full-house Opening: first Sunday every month, 8:00 AM to 16:00 PM

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    The Presidential BuildingThe...

    by Dophinfly Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    The Presidential Building
    The Presidential Building used to be the Office of the Taiwan Governor-General during the Japanese occupation of Taiwan . Its construction began on June 1, 1912, and was completed in March 1919 . With the stage of the main entrance as its center , and with each floor in good formation , this solid building is well organized in structure , symmetric in shape , and distinctive in design .
    Inside the building there are tall cylinders , refined ornaments , long corridors and exquisite arches , a building most influenced by English brick-built architecture during the period of Japanese rule .
    During the final stage of World War II , bombardments seriously damaged the building . Reparative construction was completed in the year following Taiwan¡¦s retrocession to China in 1945 , and the building was renamed as Chieh Shou Hall in celebration of the 60th birthday of the then President Chiang Kai-shek . Since the Republic of China government moved to Taiwan in 1949 , this building has been used as the Office of the President. To date , it remains center of the nation's top leadership .

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    Presidental Building

    by Jim_Eliason Written Dec 13, 2009

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    Presidental Building
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    This and the Congress building next door is the home of Taiwanese government. This building was built in 1919 for the occupying Japanese government.

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  • AndreasK's Profile Photo

    The Presidential Office...

    by AndreasK Written Sep 7, 2002

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    The Presidential Office Building stands to the east of the Taipei Peace Memorial Park. Further to the northeast of the park are the Taiwanese main government buildings.

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