Local Food, Bangkok

18 Reviews

Know about this?

hide
  • Local Food
    by machomikemd
  • Local Food
    by machomikemd
  • Local Food
    by machomikemd
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Pomegranate

    by machomikemd Written Nov 1, 2013
    4 more images

    thailand is a powerhouse in growing various fruits from around the world and it has a large fruit agro-industrial industry besides the traditional rice growing. evidence of this is that you can buy assorted fruits and fresh fruit drinks in Bangkok Streets, which are sometimes not seen in other South East Asian Countries and an example is the pomengranate. which is readily available. the pomengranate is popular in the middle east, but the thais have successfully cultivated and propagated this wonderful fruit and you can buy the pomengranate juice anywhere in bangkok and the cost of fresh pomengranate juice, which is made in front of you via a juicer, is about 40 baht, which is very cheap as it will cost you 3 times that amount when buying in the middle east.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Food and Dining
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Thai Green Curry-Very Spicy!

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Green Curry Packs
    4 more images

    In Thai cuisine green curry is one of the spicier variations of curry (the spiciest is the southern thailand favorite the indian inspired massaman red curry!). The thickness of the sauce varies with the amount of coconut milk used. The main ingredients are coconut milk, green curry paste, eggplant, sugar, fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves and thai basil leaves. Thai curries are names from their color, not for the spiciness. The paste is briefly fried in a wok and coconut milk is added, then the meat and vegetables added along with a pinch of brown sugar. Finally, kaffir lime leaves and thai basil are added just at the end of cooking for fragrance.

    Thai green curry can be made with meat, chicken, fish or vegetables and is usually eaten as an accompaniment to rice or round rice noodles known as "khanom jeen".

    Also Available in Packs like in the picture, Available at Foodland Supermarkets and other Supermarkets like in tesco or Big C and at the 7-11 stores or family mart stores in Bangkok for 18 Baht (0.620 USD) a pack!

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Dried Fruits

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    buying
    4 more images

    Dried fruits (or dehydrated fruits as thai's would say) are plentiful in bangkok, you can buy them anywhere. they cost about 90 baht (3 USD) a pack and you can select from many kinds like pineapple, mango guava, tamarind, pomelo, jackfruit and a lot more! It is cheaper to buy in MBK than in places like Siam Paragon, Siam Square, Central World or Gaysorn. so when it thailand, buy these assorted sweet and dried fruits!

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Abalone Sauce-Heavenly

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abalone Sauce
    4 more images

    Abalone (from Spanish Abulón) are a species of shellfish (mollusks) from the Haliotidae family The meat of this mollusk is considered a delicacy in certain parts of Latin America (especially Chile), South East Asia, and East Asia and some abalone are fermented and developed into abalone sauce, which is similar to oyster sauce in flavor and acts as a flavor enhancer of soups, stir fried dishes, braised meats, vegetable soups, wet noodles and a lot more! The thais have their own abaolone suace is is a little spicy. it is best as a flavor enhancer for stewed dishes. you can buy them at the convenience stores and supermarkets around bangkok.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Instant Thai Fried Rice!

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tatu Thai Fried Rice
    4 more images

    Instant Thai Fried Rice Seasoning! with english instructions. You can make thai fried rice at your home with it. I bought many of this packs at Foodland Supermarket for only 24 Baht (0.73 USD) each! You can also buy them at assorted convenience stores around bangkok like in 7-11 storesm family mart, tesco stores and more. It has no spiciness whatsoevr so if you want to make your thai fried rice spicy when cooking, then add fresh chilies or chili powder. you can add any topping you want like pork, beef, shrimp, chicken, seafood or a combination of all.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Assorted Thai Desserts

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    street stalls selling sweets
    4 more images

    Like Most Countries in the East Asian and South East Asian Region, Thialand has a sweet tooth and tbhey have numerous sweet desserts and sweet snacks that you can think of of which some are similar to other southeast asian sweets (like in vietnam, cambodia, laos, malaysia, philipiines. etc). You can buy these assorted thai sweets everywhere and prices start at 10 to 80 baht, depending on the quantity and on the ingredients. Examples of thai desserts include Pun Crib, Khao Tang, Krong Kraeng, Khao Niaw Ma Mauang, Thai Spring Roll, and more! Dee Licious!

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Thai Pork Sausage

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thai Chinese Style Pork Sausage
    4 more images

    Thai Pork Sausage which are similar to Chinese pork sausages. Best as topping for Asian Fried Rice or an ingredient to chop suey or even as topping for fried or wet noodles. Available everywhere in Bangkok, I Bought This is Foodland Supermarket in front of my hotel for 40 Baht (1.32 USD). They also sell these kind of pork sausages at the street food stalls together with the barbecued meats like pork, chicken, beef, satays, innards and more. these thair pork sausages are spicy! so it is best to have a thai iced tea handy when eating it.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Thai Version of "Chicharrones"

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 12, 2012

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thai
    4 more images

    Chicharrones is a popular dish that originated in Spain and became popular in Latin America, Philippines, Guam, Mexico and others. The singular form, chicharrón, is also used as a mass noun. They are usually made with different cuts of pork, but sometimes made with ram meat. In Puerto Rico chicharrones are also made with chicken, in Argentina with beef, and in Peru with chicken or fish.The pork rind type is the skin of the pork after it has been seasoned and deep fried. In Mexico they are eaten in a taco or gordita with salsa verde. In Latin America they are eaten alone as a snack, with cachapas, as a stuffing in arepas or pupusas, or as the meat portion of various stews and soups.

    This Thai version of Chicharrones, called chainarong differs primarily from Spanish Type in that it is Very Thin in texture but is also crispy. It costs 140 baht (4.50 USD) a 250 mg pack and is available everwhere. I bought this at Siam Paragon and at MBK.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Selected Thai Desserts by King Power

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amazing Thai Desserts Front Cover
    4 more images

    Assorted Thai Dessert available on all King Power Duty Free Shops, However I Bought This at Suvarnabhumi Airport. Quite Expensive at 400 Baht (12 USD) but is very satisfying as you can savor a sampling of assorted thai desserts. I bought other thai snacks and dessert there that cost me 3000 Baht in all and i will post them here however some are not taken from my camera since i have thrown some of the boxes already.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • YaaDong's Profile Photo

    (Annual Vegetarian Feastival) Kin Jay

    by YaaDong Updated Dec 2, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Thai Vegetarian Festival is an annual event held during the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar. It is believed that the vegetarian festival and its accompanying sacred rituals bestow good fortune upon those who religiously observe this rite. The Thai Vegetarian Festival falls usually in the middle of October until the end of the month.So look for restaurants or street stalls with yellow flags with red Thai or Chinese writing.They will serve vegetarian food.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Budget Travel
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtcowgirl's Profile Photo

    Eating With Chopsticks

    by mtcowgirl Written Jun 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While sometimes Thais eat with chopsticks, often they do not. Normally only noodle and soup dishes are eaten with chopsticks.

    Western eating utensils were introduced to Thailand by the king in the 1800's so there is a long tradition of eating with the fork. So if you are served a meal and don't receive chopsticks, don't be upset...it's not because the restaurant lacks faith in your ability to master eating with them but rather its tradition to eat with a fork :)

    Some universal etiquette rules for using chopsticks are:
    1.) Never play drums or otherwise play with chopsticks as it is considered bad mannered to do so.
    2.) Do not leave chopsticks standing upright in food such as rice
    3.) Standard practice is to balance the chopsticks on a rest or on a dish and keep the ends off the table while in use

    Was this review helpful?

  • standlea's Profile Photo

    Using only the finest of ingredients

    by standlea Written Mar 20, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fountian made with Thai local materials
    2 more images

    There is a mountainous region in the North where due to time and natural occurrences salt crystals have been trapped and aged for hundreds of years. In the village of Nan farmers make salt the old fashion way leaving a raw but finely aged and naturally cured salt. Combined with other raw materials local to Thailand, and the a clay stoneware body dug in Chang Rai the Clay Temple takes the utmost care in bring live from the surrounding area and packaging it in ceramic wares that can be enjoyed at home. In the old capital city of Ayuthaya a kiln site has give rise to ceramic ware made from Thai local materials with a cosmopolitan perspective.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bangkokjoe's Profile Photo

    Interesting Recipes of Additives and Chemicals

    by Bangkokjoe Updated Nov 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Breakfast for the Boss (and Assistant)

    After "people" and "having fun", "food" is way up there on the priorities of Thai / Bangkok folk.

    Even if "merely"having a snack (and there are plenty of excuses for a snack in Thailand. "We're just popping out for a snack" is the most used phrase in this office.) There are two options. Option Healthy: Fruits, som tum (mango salad stuff) and juices decanted into a placcie bag tied with a rubber band with a straw lobbed in the top. Option Hangover: Pot of Mama Noodles and some energy drinks - teeming and crammed with msg, e numbers, artificial colourings and a good many substances that should be on the Grade A list down the D.E.A. If these chemicals don't rebalance your body after a night on the Sang Thip and Singha / Leo, then you might as well give up.

    With snacking and eating in Thailand the cultural code is to always offer and share with those around you, offer it around to your mates, ask those in the cab if they want some, or the security guard, or the receptionist, or your tour guide. Once you've offered food you are likely to be well included with the gang. Serious, "bai gin khao" (going to eat rice) and you are away and in there!

    Three (possibly four, let's see how we go, eh?) smallish points with food in Bangkok;
    1. Show a bit of respect to your food. Messing / joking around with your mashed potatoes, like making mountains and rivers with the gravy, is not good. Your meal is the result of someone who worked hard to make it.
    2. Food is not to be wasted... there is always someone who could have used what you waste. (Remember this if you are usually a "pile it high and leave half of it-er" at the all-you-can-eat buffets.)
    3. Eating on the move (e.g. walking through the lobby of The Oriental) with a BLT sandwich going in your gob is looked down upon. And walking along Phetchburi troughing on a hamburger looks a bit weird.
    ...4. Eating on your own can be perceived that the solo refueller is a sad lamp, and has no mates to share / socialise with.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pimilan's Profile Photo

    Thai ice tea

    by Pimilan Written Oct 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the mix

    This is a typical thai ice tea receipt : lipton tea, hot water, condensed milk, plunder ice, thai cream. Usually you found this really good ice tea in small local restaurant for about 10 to 30 bahts. Now it exist the mix in supermarket.

    Was this review helpful?

  • zazatann's Profile Photo

    Insect fried is just regional specialty food

    by zazatann Updated Oct 23, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    grasshopper fried

    When you walk along street and you see these insect fried such as grasshopper, bamboo worm, and hard wing insects or baby birds. Could you please understand that it's just local food for some region of Thailand? As you know that Bangkok is like the most civilize city in this country. There’re many people from every part of Thailand move and find a job to work here. Some people are still get use to with eating this kind of food which they get use to. That’s why there is a lot of this kind of food sells along street.

    Insect fried could look disgusting for some of you but for me. It’s just a type of food that somebody can eat and some can’t. I can’t eat as well because the region where I came from has no kind of this food at all. So, please note that it’s not typical Thai food but just special type of food for some of people here.

    By the way, I’ve tired grasshopper and bamboo worm fried though. I still confirm that it’s not bad but I’d rather eat chicken. Ha….

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bangkok

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

View all Bangkok hotels