Grand Palace, Bangkok

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Maharaj Pier, Chao Phraya, Bangkok 02-224-1833

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  • Cathy&Gary's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace Bangkok

    by Cathy&Gary Written Feb 13, 2014
    Grand Palace Bangkok
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    The Grand Palace is a must see in Bangkok. For 150 years the Palace complex was home to the King and also to the entire government, including the country's war ministry, state departments and the mint.

    Thai Kings stopped living in the Palace around the turn of the 20th century. However the complex still remains the seat of power and spiritual heart of the Thai Kingdom.

    The Grand Palace complex also houses the Temple of the Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Keow), the most famous Buddhist temple. At the heart of the temple itself is a fabulous Buddha image, carved from one piece of Jade. This image is the holiest and most revered of religious objects in Thailand today.

    The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is Thailand's most sacred site so you must be properly dressed. Men must wear long pants and shirts with sleeves. For women no see through clothes, bare shoulders etc. There are stalls near the entry that provides clothes at a small charge to cover you up if needed.

    Also be careful of touts outside the palace who tell you it is closed, then suggest their own tour instead. Their 'tour' will be to shops where they get commissions on your purchases and the Palace will really be open!!

    Admission fees are 400 baht and the Grand Palace is open every day from 8:30 to 3:30, unless its being used for a state function.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Imperial Palace

    by solopes Updated Dec 24, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bangkok - Thailand
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    We feel small! We feel poor! We feel ugly. But we feel blessed by the fortune of seeing such a collection of art masterpieces, in this large complex.

    It's impossible to go to Bangkok without this palace in mind. Go with time (there are crowds) and if you're not in an escorted visit read what you can before going, or... in place. It's fantastic!

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  • Treshi's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace, a must see in Bangkok

    by Treshi Written Aug 8, 2013

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    Inside the Grand Palace
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    This is the pride of Bangkok and a must visit for anyone visiting Bangkok. Enjoyed the place very much and the architecture of the place. Suggest you take a guide for the tour since they will explain the history and the place very well. The area is huge and palace looks amazingly beautiful.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Grand Palace

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jul 14, 2013

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    The Temple of the Emerald Buddah.
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    This building is a must see for visitors to Bangkok. Dress respectfully cover your knees and shoulders or you'll have to borrow clothing before you go in.

    Don't listen to the touts outside who tell you the building is closed and try and get you into their tuk-tuk; just ignore them.

    The palace grounds contain the wonderful Temple of the Emerald Buddah, a much revered Buddah image dating from the 14th century. The Siamese took this from Vientienne, Laos. We saw its original home when we visited there. The temple complex is large and ornate, the Buddah is quite small. It is normally surrounded by worshippers.

    The Grand Palace was built in 1782 and was home to theThai kings for 150 years. There are some lovely paintings on the palace walls.

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    Grand Palace - Garudas, Demons and Sacred Beings

    by Anniko Updated Jul 4, 2013

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    Garudas Galore!
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    Deep within the walls of the Grand Palace complex in Bangkok, you’ll encounter a sacred sight, the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. (Wat Phra Kaew). This fine example of Buddhist architecture is covered from roof to floor in gold, interspersed with mosaic columns containing colored glass and porcelain pieces. It’s also surrounded by some of the best examples of Thai sculpture and decorative art.

    The Emerald Buddha is the highly revered, small, but very famous Buddha image meticulously carved from a single block of jade. Raised high on a series of platforms, no one is allowed near the Emerald Buddha except the King. A seasonal cloak, changed three times a year to correspond to the summer, winter, and rainy season, covers the statue. A very important ritual, the changing of the robes is performed only by the King to bring good fortune to the country during each season.

    Garuda, the mythical half-man, half-bird form, who holds his mortal enemy, Naga the serpent, in his talons, adorns the external walls of this venerated temple. The Garuda has become the national symbol of Thailand, and therefore features prominently in Buddhist sculpture.

    Yakshas, or giant demons, are another important element in Thai art and architecture, and will also be encountered within the Grand Palace grounds. They are common as guardians of the gates in Buddhist temples. Yakshas had a duty to protect holy places from disturbances by evil spirits, and their presence can’t be missed as you explore the confines of Wat Phra Kaew.

    Gracing the entrance to the temple is a gilded statue of the Kinnari. She is one of the loveliest of the mythology beings, half-woman, and half swan. The head and torso is of a woman, yet below the delicately tapered waist are the body, tail and legs of a swan. She is renowned for her dance, song and poetry, and is a traditional symbol of feminine beauty and accomplishment.

    The Temple of the Emerald Buddha actually consists of a series of courtyards full of a collection of buildings in different sizes and colours. All have impressive architecture and much devotion has been given to the decoration. Some are in gold, and others beautifully decorated with thousands of colored glass pieces, or patterns of broken porcelain.

    Among them is Phra Mondrop, the library that houses Buddhist scriptures. It is a spectacular building, decorated from roof to floor in intricate gold, and glittering glass mosaic panels. The entrance is protected by another pair of gilded demons.

    More of these mythological creatures, sparkling and brightly coloured, can be discovered supporting the base of a Buddhist stupa, a large golden dome housing Buddhist relics.

    Among the four groups of palaces, the Chakri Maha Prasat is the largest and most famous. Erected by King Rama V in 1882 as his own residence, the 3-storey building is a mixture of Thai and Western architecture. The top part is pure Thai with tapering spires and tiered sloping roofs, and the lower parts, designed by a British architect, are in the Imperial Victorian style. It is built in a distinctively European neo-classical style, but with a Thai roof somewhat incongruously plopped on top.

    Not only is the Grand Palace Complex the spiritual heart of Thailand, but it’s also the country’s most famous landmark, and hence tourist attraction.

    A strict dress code applies. The Grand Palace, with The Temple of the Emerald Buddha, is Thailand's most sacred site. Visitors must be properly dressed before being allowed entry. Men should wear long pants and shirts with sleeves. Women must be similarly modestly dressed. If improperly attired, there is a booth near the entrance that can provide clothes to cover you up properly. (A deposit is required).

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  • NYTim's Profile Photo

    Golden Roofs

    by NYTim Written Jun 25, 2013
    Andrew and Gabi at the Royal Palace
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    The Royal Place was the first sight we took in on our first day in Bangkok. My two kids had never been to Asia before so they were amazed. Coming from NYC they thought they had seen and done everything -- they stood with mouths agape.

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  • limkahwan's Profile Photo

    The Classic of Thailand

    by limkahwan Updated Jan 27, 2013
    The Grand Palace
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    In Thailand the National Anthem & King are uphold in highest esteem. Every visitors are expected to do the same. Even one does not follow they demand you to it. Therefore its important that you follow their culture to avoid unnecessary incident.
    When you plan to visit the Grand Palace, remember to wear decently, for man-long pants & sleeve with collar shirt, lady- blouse with sleeve (no bare-back), pants or knee length skirt(no mini skirt). These are must wear when visiting the Grand Palace.
    There are 35 places of interest in the Grand Palace.
    1). The Grand Palace - established in 1782 it consist of Royal Residence, Throne Halls, Government Offices, and The Famous Emerald Buddha inside the 218,000 sq meter. King Rama I ascended to the throne in the same year. The two earliest structures erected was Dusit Maha Prasat Throne & Phra Maha Monthian.
    2). Emerald Buddha - The most venerated site in Thailand. The Buddha is enshrined on a golden traditional Thai-style throne made of gilded-carved wood, known as Busabok. Every year the King will change the costumes three times a year (summer, rainny season and winter). This Emerald Buddha was carved from a block of green jade. It was in 1434 when the Buddha was discovered in Chiang Rai' stupa, and it was covered with plaster after a period of worship the plaster from the nose flaked off revelling the green gem and they thought it was Emerald and thus they called it Emerald Buddha was born. Later it was taken to Lampang and remained there until King Tilok of Lannathai moved it to Chiang Mai. In 1552 the Buddha was taken to Loas by King Chaichettha of Luang Prabang son of Chiang Mai Princess and Loatian King when he was called to succeed his father's throne, and stay there for 226 years until 1778 when army command by Chao Phraya Chakri (King Rama I) captured Vientiane and bring back the Buddha to Thailand. Later King Rama I established the city of Bangkok and the Emerald was housed within the Royal Monastery.
    3). The Upper Terrace - A Golden Chedi, the Mondop, a repository of Buddist sacred scripture inscribed on palm leaves. a miniature Angkor Wat order of King Rama IV (King Mongkok).
    4). Phra Maha Monthian - consists of three main buildings :- Audience Hall of Amarindra Winitchai, Paisal Taksin Hall. These was build in 1785 during the reign of King Rama I. There is a Throne surmounted by nine-tiered canopy flanked by two seven tiered white umbrellas and backed by a boat shaped altar. The Paisalk Taksin Hall is where the coronation ceremony held.t side you can find the royal bedchamber.
    5). The Borom Phiman Mansion - The only Western style building built by King Rama V in 1903, it served as Royal Guest House.
    Overall these are the most important places in Bangkok. For anyone who visit Bangkok must allocate time for this visit, it's a must visit in Bangkok.

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  • Antonycarrera's Profile Photo

    A must to see in Bangkok

    by Antonycarrera Written Jan 6, 2013

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's an impressive place. A must to see. We can feel a very special ambiance.
    The luxury of thai history.
    You can spend hours and hours to view all the details or just enjoy the entire view.

    The negative point is the policy of entrance fee: Thai and foreigner don't pay the same price.

    Maybe Thais not clever enough to enjoy 100% of the site? Not a friendly policy.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace- A Royal Complex (2)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 23, 2012

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    Part two of My Grand Palace Tips with more pictures around.

    This will be my things to do tips on the Grand Palace Complex, I will have a separate tip for the Wat Phra Keaw (Temple of the Emerald Buddha)

    The Grand Palace is the Ceremonial heart of Thailand as it was the official residence of the Kings of Thailand and Siam since the 18th century (after the collapse of the Ayuthaya Dynasty) from the Start of the Thonburi Period up to the Present Chakri Dynasty, until present King Bhumipol Adulyadej moved the royal residence to Chitralada Palace in the Dusit District, however the place is still the area for Ceremonial Purposes like the King and Queen's Birthday and other State Ceremonies and is the number one tourist destination in Bangkok.

    The palace complex sits on the east bank of the Chao Phraya River. The other approaches to the palace are protected by a defensive wall of 1,900 metres in length, which encloses an area of 218,400 square metres. Further out from the wall is a canal, which was also created for defensive purposes, making the area surrounding the palace an island, known as Rattanakosin.

    parts of the Grand Palace:

    1) Wat Phra Kaew, the temple containing the Emerald Buddha
    2) Chakri Mahaprasad Hall
    3) Prasat Phra Debidorn
    4) Phra Sri Ratana chedi
    5) The Museum, which has information on the restoration of the Grand Palace, scale models of
    the Wat and Palace and numerous Buddha images
    6) Bell tower
    7) Dusit Hall
    8) Amarinda Hall, the original residence of King Rama I and the Hall of Justice
    9) Boromabiman Hall, built by King Rama VI

    The combined compound is open 8:30am to 4:30 pm everyday. Cost is 200 Baht (if you are Thai, it's free), and the admission ticket includes admission to Vimanmek Mansion and Abhisek Dusit Throne Hall, Anantra Smakom Throne Hall and Sanam Chandra Palace, allb in the Dusit area of the city and the ticket is good for three days if you plan to visit the Mansion and Dusit Throne Halls on a separate day. The entrance to the compound is on Na Phra Lan road, on the north side.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace- A Royal Complex (1)

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 23, 2012

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    entrance
    4 more images

    This will be my things to do tips on the Grand Palace Complex, I will have a separate tip for the Wat Phra Keaw (Temple of the Emerald Buddha)

    The Grand Palace is the Ceremonial heart of Thailand as it was the official residence of the Kings of Thailand and Siam since the 18th century (after the collapse of the Ayuthaya Dynasty) from the Start of the Thonburi Period up to the Present Chakri Dynasty, until present King Bhumipol Adulyadej moved the royal residence to Chitralada Palace in the Dusit District, however the place is still the area for Ceremonial Purposes like the King and Queen's Birthday and other State Ceremonies and is the number one tourist destination in Bangkok.

    The palace complex sits on the east bank of the Chao Phraya River. The other approaches to the palace are protected by a defensive wall of 1,900 metres in length, which encloses an area of 218,400 square metres. Further out from the wall is a canal, which was also created for defensive purposes, making the area surrounding the palace an island, known as Rattanakosin.

    parts of the Grand Palace:

    1) Wat Phra Kaew, the temple containing the Emerald Buddha
    2) Chakri Mahaprasad Hall
    3) Prasat Phra Debidorn
    4) Phra Sri Ratana chedi
    5) The Museum, which has information on the restoration of the Grand Palace, scale models of
    the Wat and Palace and numerous Buddha images
    6) Bell tower
    7) Dusit Hall
    8) Amarinda Hall, the original residence of King Rama I and the Hall of Justice
    9) Boromabiman Hall, built by King Rama VI

    The combined compound is open 8:30am to 4:30 pm everyday. Cost is 200 Baht (if you are Thai, it's free), and the admission ticket includes admission to Vimanmek Mansion and Abhisek Dusit Throne Hall, Anantra Smakom Throne Hall and Sanam Chandra Palace, allb in the Dusit area of the city and the ticket is good for three days if you plan to visit the Mansion and Dusit Throne Halls on a separate day. The entrance to the compound is on Na Phra Lan road, on the north side.

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  • JonH45's Profile Photo

    Grand palace is a must see

    by JonH45 Written Aug 18, 2012

    You must be properly dressed before being allowed to entry the temple. That means no see through clothes or bare shoulders for women and long pants and shirts with sleeves for men.....
    http://talkbangkok.com/listings/1349/explore/temples/the-grand-palace

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  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace

    by Rinjani Written Jun 10, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of buildings in the Grand Palace Complex

    The Grand Palace is a-must-see in Bangkok. The huge palace complex consists of number of buildings is built in 218,000 m2 area. The temple was built in 1782 by King Rama 1. To go around the palace, you need at least one or two hours. The complex is huge and photogenic, and suddenly two hours passed very fast.

    Interesting place to see is Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles, where you can shop souvenir and famous Thai silks. We visited The Royal Monastery of the Emerald Buddha. His Majesty Buddha is dressed with one of three seasonal costumes; summer, rainy and winter. You will be shown the different costumes and it is good to know what season at your time of visiting.

    Inside the Monastery, you are not allowed to take picture. Most visitors sit in silent, you can see monks and visitors prayer. The atmosphere is very serene and peaceful.

    From the brochures, several buildings that interesting to see are: The Phra Maha Monthian Group, consisting of three halls, The Chakri Group, central throne hall, The Dusit Group, a throne hall, The Upper Terrace, consisting of four main monuments, and the Borom Phiman mansion, which was built in western style.

    Admission fee is 400 THB. Open everday from 8.30 a.m. to 16.30 p.m. Tickets sold until 15.30
    p.m.

    If you visit the palace, please dress conservatively, covering shoulder and knee length skirt/trouser. Sarong is available for rental with deposit of 200 THB.

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  • Suitable attire for Grand Palace entry.

    by BangkokIsabel Written Dec 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you want a hassle free visit to the Grand Palace then ensure you're wearing a top with at least short sleeves and not body hugging, no leggings or shorts. If wearing a skirt then not above knee and not tight either. You can cover up with clothing rented at Grand Palace from the first building on the right before you pay your entry fee.
    Take a cold drink in with you and a fan to cool you down. Then enjoy.

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  • Suet's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace and round with a tuk tuk

    by Suet Written Nov 27, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just hire a TukTuk and get them to take you to the Grand Palace. It is stunning. HUGE jade Buddha *remember never to point your feet towards it, a very great sign of disrespect* lots of brilliant and cheap shopping, fantastic street food, get the tuktuk driver to stop at the shops for you. Remember to bargain. You can also book a river restaurant cruise which will take you past the well lit monuments and temples. The food is excellent.

    Check out my pages.

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  • Scam alert

    by Stumbler Written Nov 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When arriving at the Grand Palace entrance ignore the touts who point out that you are not appropriately dressed and offer to rent you a set of clothes. Once you pass throught the main entrance there is an official office where you can borrow a set of clothes at no charge after paying a returnable deposit.

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