Grand Palace, Bangkok

312 Reviews

Na Phra Lan Rd, Maharaj Pier +66 2 623 5500 ext 3100

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  • Grand Palace
    by schurman23
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    Grounds of the Wat Phra...
    by Greggor58
  • Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand.
    Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand.
    by Greggor58
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Angkor Wat Model at the Grand Palace

    by machomikemd Written Sep 3, 2012

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Angkorian Empire in the 9th century was the premiere empire of Indochina and the mini states of thailand were it's vassals then but in the 13th century, the Ayuthaya Empire supplanted the Angkorian Empire as the Premiere Empire of Indo China and the Siem Reap (the Thai Name of Siem Reap Province was Siam Nakhon Province) and Battambang Provinces of Cambodia was part of Thailand from the 14th century up to the early 19th century, as they gave up possesion of half of cambodia to the french in the early 19th century as a condtion of the British not to fight with the french for the Indo chinese lands in 1907 and the angkor wat model was commisioned by the chakri king Rama IV as part of the glory of Thai Rule then. The Angkor Wat Model is located at the middle of the many monuments erected at the Wat Phra Kew part of the Grand Palace Complex.

    more views of the angkor wat model with my friends at the angkor wat model me again the sign with my friends at
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  • JonH45's Profile Photo

    Grand palace is a must see

    by JonH45 Written Aug 18, 2012

    You must be properly dressed before being allowed to entry the temple. That means no see through clothes or bare shoulders for women and long pants and shirts with sleeves for men.....
    http://talkbangkok.com/listings/1349/explore/temples/the-grand-palace

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  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace

    by Rinjani Written Jun 10, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grand Palace is a-must-see in Bangkok. The huge palace complex consists of number of buildings is built in 218,000 m2 area. The temple was built in 1782 by King Rama 1. To go around the palace, you need at least one or two hours. The complex is huge and photogenic, and suddenly two hours passed very fast.

    Interesting place to see is Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles, where you can shop souvenir and famous Thai silks. We visited The Royal Monastery of the Emerald Buddha. His Majesty Buddha is dressed with one of three seasonal costumes; summer, rainy and winter. You will be shown the different costumes and it is good to know what season at your time of visiting.

    Inside the Monastery, you are not allowed to take picture. Most visitors sit in silent, you can see monks and visitors prayer. The atmosphere is very serene and peaceful.

    From the brochures, several buildings that interesting to see are: The Phra Maha Monthian Group, consisting of three halls, The Chakri Group, central throne hall, The Dusit Group, a throne hall, The Upper Terrace, consisting of four main monuments, and the Borom Phiman mansion, which was built in western style.

    Admission fee is 400 THB. Open everday from 8.30 a.m. to 16.30 p.m. Tickets sold until 15.30
    p.m.

    If you visit the palace, please dress conservatively, covering shoulder and knee length skirt/trouser. Sarong is available for rental with deposit of 200 THB.

    One of buildings in the Grand Palace Complex
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  • Cathy&Gary's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace & Temple of the Emerald Buddha

    by Cathy&Gary Updated May 6, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grand Palace is a must see in Bangkok.

    For 150 years the Palace complex was home to the King and also the entire government, including the country's war ministry, state departments, and the mint.

    Thai Kings stopped living in the palace full time around the turn of the twentieth century, but the complex remains the seat of power and spiritual heart of the Thai kingdom.

    The Grand Palace complex also houses the Temple of the Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Keow), the most famous Buddhist temple and at the heart of the temple itself is a fabulous Buddha image, carved from one piece of Jade, which is the holiest and most revered of religious objects in Thailand today.

    Admission fees are 400Baht which also includes tickets to Vimanmek Mansion.

    The Grand Palace is open every day from 8:30 to 3:30, unless its being used for a state function.

    The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is Thailand's most sacred site so you must be properly dressed.

    Men must wear long pants and shirts with sleeves . If you're wearing sandals you must wear socks. For women no see-through clothes, bare shoulders, etc.

    There is a booth near the entry that provides clothes to cover you up if needed. You must leave your passport or credit card as security.

    Also be careful of touts outside the palace who tell you it is closed, then suggest their own tour instead.

    Their 'tour' will be to shops where they get commissions on your purchases and the Palace will really be open!!

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  • Suet's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace and round with a tuk tuk

    by Suet Written Nov 27, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just hire a TukTuk and get them to take you to the Grand Palace. It is stunning. HUGE jade Buddha *remember never to point your feet towards it, a very great sign of disrespect* lots of brilliant and cheap shopping, fantastic street food, get the tuktuk driver to stop at the shops for you. Remember to bargain. You can also book a river restaurant cruise which will take you past the well lit monuments and temples. The food is excellent.

    Check out my pages.

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  • schurman23's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace

    by schurman23 Updated Oct 14, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grand Palace is a very large complex of colorful temples. One of the attractions inside is the Temple of Emerald Buddha. The emerald buddha is said to have originated from India. It was later discovered as far as Cambodia, then Laos and finally Vietnam before it was transferred to Thailand. It is carved from emerald, unfortunately visitors are not allowed to touch it as it stands in a very high pedestal. No pictures are also allowed inside the temple. Another attraction of course is the Palace Hall. The palace was formerly used as the center of the Thai Government and residence of the Thai King. The present King however preferred to reside in another palace so this place is now used for selected royal rituals and ceremonies. Unfortunately for tourists this part of the Grand Palace is sometimes closed to the public when the palace is being used for royal rituals. Third attraction would be the multi-colored temples and architectural structures inside the grand palace complex. Entrance is 400 baht.

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  • elhombre30's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace

    by elhombre30 Updated Oct 11, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Getting to Grand Palace is a lot easier by taking Taxi or "tuk-tuk" however, according to one travel blog I read, it is much more exciting to take Ferry thru Chao Phraya river to be able to see more of Bangkok. Therefore we decided to take that option. The Taksim Ferry station is approximately 10 minutes walk from our hotel in Silom Street where you can ride a Ferry worth 200.00 baht per person to Tan Thien Station.
    Here are some photos took while on cruise.

    After 5-7 minutes, we arrived at the ferry terminal which is about 300 steps to Grand Palace Entrance. There were several thai's offering you their goods and they will write the amount in a piece of paper (They are not an English country at all) . And if you response "so expensive!", they will hand you over the pen and the piece of paper so you can write the amount you want to bargain. LOL... Nice!

    Right stepping at the main gate of the Grand Palace, there you can see hundreds of foreigners! They all scattered in different corners. Most of them are Chinese and Koreans, and some Westerners.
    Due to my "broken pant" as they describe it, the security personnel did not allow me to enter the Palace and advised me to rent a "pants" and so with other tourist wearing shorts and sleeveless shirts - 200.00 baht rent refundable.
    No wonder it's called GRAND PALACE, it is really beautiful! I imagine how Thai's in their creative and craftsmanship skills build this huge temples within the complex piece by piece. It could have been taken years to complete every single details of four each corners of this dazzling and spectacular Palace. Here are some of the photos and be get amazed!

    Grand Palace Grand Palace Grand Palace Grand Palace Grand Palace
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  • colin_bramso's Profile Photo

    The Grand Palace

    by colin_bramso Updated Sep 12, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you do nothing else in Bangkok, you must visit the Grand Palace. The name is misleading, because it's not 'a palace' but is actually an area of nearly 22 hectares. A quiet oasis in the bustle of the city, it is full of astonishing buildings. They are Royal residences, temples and government offices. The architecture, the colours, the gold leaf, the attention to detail are breathtaking.

    Stunning architecture Parklike setting An oasis of peace Beautiful buildings Gold leaf glitters in the sun
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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    The Royal Gran Palace

    by draguza Updated Sep 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bangkok's Grand Palace served as the official residence of Thailand's kings from the time it was built in 1782 until midway through the 20th Century. Although the entry fee is considerably higher than most at 300 baht, the grounds are gorgeous and provide an unforgettable glimpse at Thai history and architecture. Sitting on over 215,000 square meters, the Grand Palace houses government offices, the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, and royal residences. A trip to the Grand Palace is worth combining with Wat Pho, its next-door neighbor of equal cultural importance

    The Grand Palace is a Bangkok must-see, but beware of tourist traps! If a tuk tuk driver tells you that the Palace is closed for the day, make sure to get confirmation. And definitely think twice before agreeing to take the city tour he'll probably offer.

    At the Royal Grand Palace
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  • saraton's Profile Photo

    grand palace

    by saraton Written Jul 6, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    grand palace bangkok well worth the visit one of the most beutiful palaces ive seen, if theres only one thing you can do in bagkok go here, we traveled using the sky train and boat, getting around is easy if your not in a car...........

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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace

    by Maria81 Written Jun 19, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What?

    Grand Palace is not currently used by the royal family, save for the ceremonial occasions, so the grounds and the four palace buildings can be visited on most days (the buildings were closed on my first trip due to the lying in state of one of the members of the royal family).

    Here's what you can see:

    - Grand Panace Hall, built at the end of the 19th Century following the blueprint of British architects and blending European and Thai building styles
    - Dusit Hall, originally a site for audiences and subsequently a royal funerary hall
    - Borombhiman Hall, a former residence of Rama VI and the headquarters of a couple
    - Amarindra Hall, former royal court

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  • Grand Palace & Wat Po by River ferry

    by RobSydney Written May 10, 2011

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    I like to take the ferry up the river to the Grand Palace, that way you get a nice view of the city and river as you get there
    Take the sky train to Saphin Taksin. Then you get off the train and go down the stairs to the street and walk about 50 meters to the ferry terminal. Take a ferry to jetty number 9 ( each jetty is numbered so its easy to know which one to go to). You pay on the boat. Saphin Taksin is jetty 0, so you have 8 stops if the boat stops all stops- some are all stops, some express but they all stop at number 9. Sit on the left hand side if you can get seats so you see the river better and keep your camera handy for some great photos particularly of Wat Arun as you go past. Get off at jetty 9 and walk straight ahead through the little covered terminal and out into the somewhat chaotic market outside. Keep walking straight ahead to the street , cross the road and walk straight ahead about 300 meters to the entry to the Grand Palace. Warning- ignore touts who tell you the temple is closed for some reason ( any reason) no matter how official they look or sound. Go to the entry to the palace , on the right hand side and walk in down the road about 40 meters to the ticket booth on your left. 400 baht and keep walking to the turnstyles into the Emerald Buddha temple- quite spectacular and many great photos. Wear long pants, and a shirt that covers your shoulders and closed shoes or they may require you to rent a sarong type thing that a hundred backpackers have worn when they showed up in board shorts and a singlet. See the temple and surrounds and then out the exit to the Grand Palace- if a week day many museums are open and good to see as well as the palace surrounds. Back the way you came and back to jetty 9 , there is a small air conditioned cafe on the corner of the above mentioned chaotic market for a lime soda as your hot and need a sit down. Then tuk Tuk or walk 500 meters down the outside of the grand palace to Wat Po or Temple of Reclining Buddha. Get a guide ( 300 baht) and see the temple and surrounds. If you still feel like more templeing, head back to the jetty and get a boat across to Wat Arun, I am not really sure it is worth visiting as you have seen it from the river and the distant view is the best way to see it.. You can get home the way you came , or just take a taxi. Avoid tuk Tuks as they are generally more expensive and just there to rip off tourists. On your way back you may want to go via the shopping district, I like Pan Thip Plaza - 5 stories of electrical, gadgets, DVD's computers and so on. Just down Petchaburi road about 200 meters from Pan Thip is Pratunum Mall , on the same side as Pan Thip, a huge wholesale clothing mall, so many clothes and things you cant jump over them. Alternatively you can go to MBK , a popular mall for low cost clothes etc near Siam station.
    Another stop on this days journy is jetty number 7 Saphin Phut, it is the flower market and if you have a lady with you they always love to see the fantastic displays of flowers for sale, any time before 11ish in the morning. You get off at Jetty 7 and turn left , follow the road as it turns to the right and you find your self at the market.
    Yet another stop on this trip is at Jetty 9, if you are facing the river, and turn right walk about 200 meters and you come to a huge amulet market- about an acre of stalls selling those little Buddha amulets you see all over Bangkok.
    Thats about 3/4's of a day

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  • Greggor58's Profile Photo

    Grand Palace and Wat Phra Kaew…MUST SEE STOPOVER…

    by Greggor58 Written Mar 6, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you don’t have much time in Bangkok…BE SURE TO INCLUDE some time here..it really is a MUST SEE attraction here in Bangkok.

    I won’t go into much detail here as information is well documented here at VT and is easily available at other sources on-line.

    There are more than a couple of major “sights” here and in addition to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, there is a complex of ornately decorated and unique buildings here that in the past have served as the royal residences and throne halls of the royal family. There is also a bevy of government offices and the Wat Phra Kaeo Museum…and access to the Temple grounds, the Central Court grounds, and the museum are included in the entrance fee. At the time I visited in February of 2010 the entrance fee was 250 baht.

    Your entrance ticket is also good for free access to the Vimanmek Royal Mansion and the Abhisek Dusit Throne Hall, both offsite locations, which are close together, but are a short taxi or Tuk Tuk ride away.

    YOU MUST be wearing clothing that is considered respectful…I had other plans included for my day and in the heat offered up in Bangkok I was NOT wearing pants.
    At the main entrance you can “rent” pants for a small charge and a deposit must be left that is refunded when the pants are returned. The “official” policy also prohibits sandals and tank tops…I wore a shirt with short sleeves and sandals and this didn’t prevent me from entering…so other than the pants, Im not sure how stringently they enforce the policy. I did see women wearing short skirts lined up to “rent” clothing.

    I hired a GUIDE for my time here for minimal cost but BE CAUTIONED…he or she will NOT accompany you into the area of the royal grounds, residences and museum. I found him…or HE FOUND me.. just inside of the main entrance off of the street. He was holding up a sign and when I spotted him…he spotted me, and I walked directly to him and agreed on a price. The guides will only accompany you throughout the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and the Outer Court where the entrance and ticket areas are. The Central Court is the area of the grounds where the residences and throne halls and museum are located and they will not accompany you there. I thought it was worth the extra cost to hire a guide… it was inexpensive and he offered up some interesting stories and was thorough in his explanations. He also made the pants “rental” easier and because I was accompanied by him we passed into the Temple grounds through a separate line and didn’t have to line up to enter.

    In addition to exploring the Temple grounds and Central Court I would recommend a quick look around at the collection offered up in the Wat Phra Kaeo Museum. This is not only a small collection worth a look see but the “time out” indoors also offers an opportunity to catch some AC time to cool off a little.

    I budgeted and spent a few hours at the complex including a walk through the museum and a little bit of time exploring the GIFT SHOP for some treats for some friends here in Canada. The quality of the goods for sale in the gift shop is pretty good but the pricing is higher than you would find in other places. I did find exactly what I had set out to in the gift shop, some hand made embroidered table runners that I thought was of good quality at a fair price.

    The photos Ive attached here are all taken from the grounds of the temple in fact, and for a look around the grounds of the Royal Palace take a look at the photos on the Travelogue please.

    Daily 08:30 - 15:30

    Entrance fee 250 baht

    Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand. Grounds of the Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand. Grounds of the Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand. Grounds of the Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand. Grounds of the Wat Phra Kaew,Bangkok,Thailand.
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  • The grandeur of the Grand Palace

    by thescene Written Oct 25, 2010

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    The Grand Palace which used to house the Thai royal family is a complex of palaces and temples spread in a huge area. The beautifully decorated buildings which are used for various royal functions are a must see attraction. Splendid statutes of various forms can be found all over the place. Indeed this is place fit for a king.

    Also located within the complex is the Wat Phra Kaew, which is Thailand's most important Buddhist temple. Be sure to wear the proper clothing as there are police who might refuse you entry if you are wearing sleeveless shirts or shorts or sandals. This place is normally filled with tourists so you need to come as early as possible to avoid the crowds.

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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by deeper_blue Written Mar 22, 2010

    The Royal Palace is very decadent and full of magnificent Buddhist statues and architecture.
    Walking distance from Khao San Rd, it's a highlight of a stay in Bangkok and reminds you of the country's culture and traditions.

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