Temple of the Dawn - Wat Arun, Bangkok

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Tha Tien Pier, Chao Phraya River 02-466-3167

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  • overlooking the chao phraya river
    overlooking the chao phraya river
    by theguardianangel
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    more pictures
    by machomikemd
  • cruising along the chao phraya river
    cruising along the chao phraya river
    by machomikemd
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    Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) 3

    by machomikemd Written Aug 12, 2013

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    pose
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    part three of my Wat Arun Tips with more pictures of the main Central prang and smaller prangs

    Wat Arun is a buddhist temple located in the Bangkok Yai district, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. It is a Khymer Styled Chedi since thailand was ruled by the cambodians in the 12th century then the cambodians became subjects of the ayutthaya kingdom in the 15th century.

    The outstanding feature of Wat Arun is its central prang (Khmer-style tower). Steep steps lead to the two terraces. The height is reported by different sources as between 66,80 m and 86 m. The corners are surrounded by 4 smaller satellite prangs. The prangs are decorated by seashells and bits of porcelain which had previously been used as ballast by boats coming to Bangkok from China. Around the base of the prangs are various figures of ancient Chinese soldiers and animals. Over the second terrace are four statues of the Hindu god Indra riding on Erawan.

    The towers of Wat Arun are built of brick covered with stucco. The decorations are unique; thousands of pieces of multicolored Chinese porcelain. In niches in the central tower are green figures of the God Indra seated on Erawan, the traditional Thai three-headed elephant. Niches in the smaller towers contain figures of the Moon God, on a white horse. The trident of Shiva extends from the top of each tower.

    Next to the prangs is the Ordination Hall with the Niramitr Buddha image supposedly designed by King Rama II. The front entrance of the Ordination Hall has a roof with a central spire, decorated in coloured ceramic and stuccowork sheated in coloured china. There are 2 demons, or temple guardian figures in front.

    Wat arun is open from 6:00 am to 6:00 p,m everyday and there is a 50 baht entrance fee for foreigners and free for thai people.

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    Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) 2

    by machomikemd Updated Aug 12, 2013

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    king rama II
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    part two of my Wat Arun Tips with more pictures of the ceremonial hall and the temple

    Wat Arun is a buddhist temple located in the Bangkok Yai district, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. It is a Khymer Styled Chedi since thailand was ruled by the cambodians in the 12th century then the cambodians became subjects of the ayutthaya kingdom in the 15th century.

    The outstanding feature of Wat Arun is its central prang (Khmer-style tower). Steep steps lead to the two terraces. The height is reported by different sources as between 66,80 m and 86 m. The corners are surrounded by 4 smaller satellite prangs. The prangs are decorated by seashells and bits of porcelain which had previously been used as ballast by boats coming to Bangkok from China. Around the base of the prangs are various figures of ancient Chinese soldiers and animals. Over the second terrace are four statues of the Hindu god Indra riding on Erawan.

    The towers of Wat Arun are built of brick covered with stucco. The decorations are unique; thousands of pieces of multicolored Chinese porcelain. In niches in the central tower are green figures of the God Indra seated on Erawan, the traditional Thai three-headed elephant. Niches in the smaller towers contain figures of the Moon God, on a white horse. The trident of Shiva extends from the top of each tower.

    Next to the prangs is the Ordination Hall with the Niramitr Buddha image supposedly designed by King Rama II. The front entrance of the Ordination Hall has a roof with a central spire, decorated in coloured ceramic and stuccowork sheated in coloured china. There are 2 demons, or temple guardian figures in front.

    Wat arun is open from 6:00 am to 6:00 p,m everyday and there is a 5- baht entrance fee for foreigners and free for thai people.

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    Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) 1

    by machomikemd Updated Aug 12, 2013

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    front
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    part one of my Wat Arun Tips with more pictures inside.

    Wat Arun is a buddhist temple located in the Bangkok Yai district, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. It is a Khymer Styled Chedi since thailand was ruled by the cambodians in the 12th century then the cambodians became subjects of the ayutthaya kingdom in the 15th century.

    The outstanding feature of Wat Arun is its central prang (Khmer-style tower). Steep steps lead to the two terraces. The height is reported by different sources as between 66,80 m and 86 m. The corners are surrounded by 4 smaller satellite prangs. The prangs are decorated by seashells and bits of porcelain which had previously been used as ballast by boats coming to Bangkok from China. Around the base of the prangs are various figures of ancient Chinese soldiers and animals. Over the second terrace are four statues of the Hindu god Indra riding on Erawan.

    The towers of Wat Arun are built of brick covered with stucco. The decorations are unique; thousands of pieces of multicolored Chinese porcelain. In niches in the central tower are green figures of the God Indra seated on Erawan, the traditional Thai three-headed elephant. Niches in the smaller towers contain figures of the Moon God, on a white horse. The trident of Shiva extends from the top of each tower.

    Next to the prangs is the Ordination Hall with the Niramitr Buddha image supposedly designed by King Rama II. The front entrance of the Ordination Hall has a roof with a central spire, decorated in coloured ceramic and stuccowork sheated in coloured china. There are 2 demons, or temple guardian figures in front.

    Wat arun is open from 6:00 am to 6:00 p,m everyday and there is a 5- baht entrance fee for foreigners and free for thai people.

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  • Climb Wat Arun

    by liyenz Written Jun 30, 2013
    wat arun

    There were advices from the websites say that it is best to avoid crowd in the morning and go there in the evening to see the lightings. So, it is depend on individual travel plan. As for us, we decided to visit Wat Arun upon arrival to join the crowd. So, we took the boat to the opposite and started walking. Enjoy the climbing and the scenery surrounding! It is worth to climb. There is an entrance fee of 50Baht per person. And look down to see how steep the stairs are. The below picture shows how steep the stairs are. It has technique to get down and again, it depends on individual preferences to go down. On the left side of this picture shows the design of the motif found at the wall of this building. It is an unique design.

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  • A BKK Must Visit

    by TalkBangkok Written Aug 1, 2012

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    Wat Arun, the Temple of Dawn, is Bangkok most famous landmark next to the Grand Palace, located on the Thonburi west bank of the Chao Phraya River. It consists of a high central prang (its height is reported by different sources as between 66 and 86m), surrounded by four smaller prangs. All of them are all decorated by seashells and bits of porcelain which have been previously used as ballast by boats coming to Bangkok from China. The ashes of King Rama II are buried in the base of a presiding Buddha image.

    http://talkbangkok.com/listings/1293/explore/temples/wat-arun

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    Wat Arun Temple of the Dawn

    by Rinjani Written Jun 10, 2012

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    Climb to the top, Wat Arun

    Wat Arun or Temple of the Dawn is situated at the west of Chao Phraya river bank in Thonburi area. The temple is surrounded by small towers or Phra Prang. You can climb the very steep stairs to enjoy the view from the top. (Assumption height is more than 100 meter).

    The temple is photogenic, although the best spot to photograph this beautiful temple is from the river, unless if you are using wide angle.

    If you are fancy to take your picture taken in Thai dress, there is Thai traditional dress for hire.
    The temple is open from 8.30 to 5.30 with entrance fee of 200 THB. We reached this temple by the boat organized by the tour.

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    WAT ARUN

    by davidjo Written Apr 5, 2012

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    WAT ARUN

    Wat Arun, Temple of Dawn, named after the Indian God of Dawn can be seen as you travel down the river by water taxi or passenger boat. It is easy to reach by public transport (boat) or you can go on an organised tour. I am afraid it is one of the places where foreigners pay an entrance fee of 50 baht while ir is free for locals. It is possible to climb up part of the way and get a good view of the river, but to appreciate the temple more is to view it from the river. It looks wonderful at night when it is lit up.

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    The Wat Arun

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 4, 2012

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    View over Chao Phraya River from Wat Arun.
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    The beautiful Wat Arun or Temple of the Dawn is situated on the Thonburi side of the Chao Phraya River. You can get here by boat from Tha Tien near Wat Po for 3 baht. We did that on our first visit. This time we walked here from Wat Kalayanamit on the other side of the Khlong Bangkok Yai. This temple is steep and as you climb up you will be rewarded with wonderful views over the river and over Thonburi. The temple is decoarated with many statues and with brightly coloured crockery. Well worth visiting for the views alone. We came during Chinese New Year and were able to watch lion dancing here, too.

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    Wat Arun: The Temple of Dawn

    by theguardianangel Updated Nov 28, 2011

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    Wat Arun
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    Wat Arun or the Temple of Dawn is one of the popular and easiest to locate through the Chao Phraya River Express boat. The temple is decorated by bits of multi-colored porcelain and consists of 20 story prang or pagoda. Entrance fee: 50Baht, opens 8-5pm.

    You can walk through the very steep stairs of the main prang which will give a very good view of the Chao Phraya River.
    There are lots of souvenirs on the side of the main attraction. There are keychains, shirts, pens, caps, hats etc. Actually, I find the souvenirs here less cheap than those of mini stores near the Platinum Mall.

    The besy way to come here is by boat, to the Tha Tien by the Chao Phraya River Express boats. You can just transfer from 1 boat to another, fare is 2Baht.

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    Wat Arun: The Temple of the Dawn

    by HasTowelWillTravel Written Aug 26, 2011

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    From across the river Wat Arun dominates the sky
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    Located on the banks of the Chao Phraya River, Wat Arun is one of the more famous temples of Bangkok. Called the Temple of the Dawn due to its catching of the morning light, the wat is one of the newer temples in Thailand, built in the early 19th century. Still, it evokes the same architectural style and significance of much older temples (such as those seen in Sukhothai). The temple is a great place to get an up-close look at the architecture of the temples, and commands a terrific view of Bangkok.

    While Wat Arun is likely included on many city tours, taking the river taxi yourself gets you a nice tour of the river, and is less expensive. The visitor's fee for foreigners is 50 Bhat, and you can climb all the stairs up to the upper terrace.

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    visiting 9 temples (Wat): Wat Arun

    by iyukase Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    for "shining light"

    Wat Arun, often called “The Temple of Dawn”, is one of the most remarkable visual identities of Bangkok. The imposing Khmer-style “prang” or tower is 104 metres tall and decorated with bits of porcelain that was used as ballast by boats coming from China.

    Flowers...and flowers, the pattern of all temple wall is flower, so cute for a holy place....girls will love it!!!

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    The Main Spire (Prang) (2 photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Mar 29, 2011

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    The central spire has a height of approximately 70 feet, built of brick and covered with pieces of Chinese porcelain and glazed ceramic. These products were available because Chinese ships carrying Thai products to China needed ballast material while travelling without cargo back to Bangkok to reload. When loaded with cargo, the porcelain and ceramics were discarded and appropriated by the builders of the wat. Figures of demons and half - humans support the different layers. Construction was completed in the early 18th Century during the reign of Rama III. Details of the figures and ceramics are on this page.

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    Elaborate Temple

    by Robmj Written Mar 18, 2011
    Wat Arun

    Wat Arun rises to 82m and can be seen from the river. It really is stunning and a close up inspection shows you the detail and intricacy of the porcelain mosaics and decorative Hindu figures. Its an 18th century creation and the central tower is symbolic of Mt Meru which is the centre of the universe in Hindu and Buddhist mythology.

    Its open from 8.30am to 5pm with an admission of about 30B.

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    Wat Arun….Temple of the Dawn…

    by Greggor58 Written Mar 6, 2011

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    Wat Arun,Bangkok,Thailand.
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    My time here at Wat Arun was short…and we visited later in the afternoon and the light wasn’t the best for taking photos, the sun behind the temple, my intention to return another time earlier in the day was never to be reality, not on this particular visit to Bangkok.

    Wat Arun is located on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River, its known as a symbol of Bangkok and has been located here in various incarnations since before Ayutthaya was the capitol of Thailand.
    From its high central spire or prang you have a terrific view of the river and on the opposite shore, not too far from Wat Arun you can see another important Temple, Wat Pho.

    Before it was moved to the Wat Phra Kaeo, at the Grand Palace complex, the Emerald Buddha was revered here until the late 1700’s. Wat Arun is truly a marvel and beautiful architectural wonder and to see the detail in the construction is all the reason that you need to visit here. It really is something spectacular to see and is so highly revered that its image is permanently on display on EVERY 10 Baht coin of Thailand.

    The main 79 meter high tower or prang is surrounded by four smaller Prangs and as a grouping symbolically represents the “terrestrial representation of the thirty-three heavens”, a Buddhist concept. The prang itself as a structure is symbolic of the Mount Meru, a sacred mountain in Hindu and Buddhist religions that is considered the “center of the Universe”.

    All of the prangs are meticulously decorated with tiny pieces of ceramic that arrived in the country as ballast in the holds of trading vessels from China and the central prang has narrow stairways that lead to various platforms or terraces where you can stop and view the surroundings…be careful though…the stairs are QUITE steep!

    The compound of Wat Arun is quite large and as you’ll find in most of the Temples throughout Bangkok and Thailand, there are many other smaller areas and shrines for worship. I found during my little tour a small oasis of shade that was fenced off and being used by a couple of Monks that were cooling off from the mid afternoon heat. I wanted to join them…but didn’t, and after asking, they allowed me to photograph them there.

    There are plenty of opportunities to take some great photos but I would advise you to arrive in the morning to have the best light of the day to photograph here.

    The Ubosot area is off to the side of the prangs and I only visited the outside of it. Yaksha (demons) guard the entranceway to the Ubosot area, a green one on the left, a white one on the right hand side of the entrance. The main entrance was closed off and so in fact Im not sure that it’s possible to enter the Ubosot.

    Access to Wat Arun is easy if you will venture here yourself, or if you choose to explore by organized tour, I would imagine that all Tour Boats will make this a stopover on they’re itinerary.

    To get here on your own…by boat…which is most fun I think…get yourself to the Tha Tien Pier (Pier Stop 8)…located close to Wat Pho…Here you can catch a smaller boat for a small charge and it will cross the river to the pier at the Wat where you can simply walk to the entrance.
    If you are using buses to get here….busses 1, 25, 44, 47, 62 and 91 will do the job.

    The Wat is accessible from 0830 -1730 and the cost to enter is only 50 baht…or the equivalent of about $ 1.50 USA.

    Visiting here was certainly a memorable experience of my visit to Bangkok and I would definitely advise you to include some time in your itinerary here to see this for yourself.

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    Wat Arun

    by winnietankl Written Dec 4, 2010

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    Wat Arun also known as The Temple of Dawn is a Buddhist temple (wat) in the Bangkok Yai district of Bangkok, Thailand, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. You can take the ferry (15 Baht) for less than 5 minutes rides to this Temple which is just across the river. The full name of the temple is Wat Arunratchawararam Ratchaworamahawihan. This is the most famous temple in Bangkok and if you climb to the top you can have the most spectacular sights of the Chao Phraya River and some part of Bangkok. The entrace fee is 50 Baht. Please dress up politely, no sleeveless shirt, no short pants or skirts and no slipper inside the temple.

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Comments (1)

  • Jan 27, 2013 at 6:52 PM

    I keep on reading the comments and see that there's various rate on the entrance fee. Which one is the real one for foreigners?

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