Wat Pho, Bangkok

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 225 Reviews

Tha Tien Pier, Chao Phraya River, Bangkok 02-221-991

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  • Reclining Buddha
    Reclining Buddha
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  • Wat Pho
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    Wat Pho Temple

    by CDM7 Updated Feb 5, 2014

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    This Buddhist temple which is a short walk from the Grand Palace is a must place to visit when in Bangkok.As well as being the largest temple complex in the city it is also home of the leading massage school in Thailand,so a great place for getting a traditional Thai massage.
    Probably the most popular thing to see while here is the 'Reclining Buddha' which is 15 meters tall and 46 meters long.As you walk around the Buddha all you can hear is the sound of people putting coins in one of the 108 bowls that line the length of the walls.

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    Wat Pho update

    by stamporama Written Aug 6, 2013

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    As of August 2013, the entrance fee to Wat Pho is 100 baht . The price includes a free 250 ml bottle of cold mineral water. I've been to this place 3 times already and nothing has changed around the place.

    It's open everyday from 8:30 am to 6:30 pm.

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    Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand

    by TrendsetterME Updated Jun 28, 2013
    Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand
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    "Wat Pho" is one of the most visited temples in Bangkok ... Actually, if I have time, I love to visit and explore the temples on my own and not with guided tours. If you are attached to a group as in rush and hurry, its not easy to catch up the details and to feel the real atmosphere. And its better to go on your own path sothat you can shoot more photos as you wish ... :)

    Just behind the opulent extravagance of the "Temple of the Emerald Buddha" stands Wat Phra Chetuphon, which is more commonly known by its old name of "Wat Pho".

    The temple is actually much older than the city of "Bangkok" itself. It was founded in the seventeenth century, making it the oldest temple in Bangkok. The name Wat Po comes from its original name of Wat Potaram. King Rama I, the founder of Bangkok, enlarged the temple, installed many statues and other artifacts recovered from Ayutthaya, and renamed the temple Wat Phra Chetuphon in 1801.

    Here you can see more photos on my "Travelogue" about the temple ... :
    Travelogue

    Inside the ubosot is a magnificent alter with a large Buddha, all finished in gold and crystal. Outside the ubosot, but within the cloister, you can sometimes find classical mask-makers demonstrating their art.

    If you exit the cloister through the north side and turn right, you'll find the massage pavilions at the far end of the temple compound. The temple is still considered the pre-eminent place of learning for the ancient Thai medicinal art. You can get a massage at the temple, or even sign up for courses to learn Thai massage yourself.

    The easiest way to get to Wat Po is by boat. Take the Chao Phraya River Express to the Tha Thien pier, then walk through the market and up the short street. Wat Po is directly across the intersection, on your right. On the left is the rear wall of the Grand Palace.

    Visitors must pay an entrance fee of 100 Baht at booths just inside the north, or south, entrances. Prices for a massage at the temple are 250 Baht for 30 minutes, or 400 Baht for one hour massage or a 45 minute foot massage.

    Strongly advised to visit, as said, you can go there on your own to explore or the concierge desk of your hotel will arrange a guided tour for you to the temple. Enjoy ... :)

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    Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand

    by TrendsetterME Written Jun 24, 2013
    Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand
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    First of all to pay respect, you have to take of your shoes as you enter the area to see the "Reclining Buddha", there are shelfs just outside sothat you can put your shoes on, as you get out you can wear your shoes again.

    Next door to the Grand Palace you’ll find the Temple of the Reclining Buddha (Wat Pho). It’s the largest and oldest wat (temple) in Bangkok and as the name suggests, is home to the enormous "Reclining Buddha".

    You’ll also find many more Buddha images at Wat Pho which is said to have more statues of the Buddha than any other Bangkok temple.

    The Reclining Buddha was crafted to celebrate King Rama III’s restoration (1824 - 51). At 150 ft (46 m) long and 49 ft (15 m) high it is the largest Buddha image in Thailand. The reclining Buddha is decorated with gold leaf and his eyes and foot soles are inlaid with mother-of-pear.

    Aircon buses 6, 8 and 12 all stop close to Wat Pho and the Tha Tien express boat pier is very near. Ordinary buses that go near Wat Pho are ordinary buses 1, 25, 44, 47, 62 and 91 which stop on Maharat road. 44, 47 and 91 all stop on Thaiwang road, on the north side of Wat Pho, south of Wat Phra Kaew. It's also just a short river crossing away from Wat Arun. It's within walking distance of Wat Phra Kaew / Grand Palace, and (if you're feeling energetic) the National Museum too.

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    Buddha in The Royal Courtyard: Phra Upostha

    by goutammitra Written Nov 24, 2012
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    Many people miss this temple of Buddha in the Royal Courtyard

    The principal Buddha image is “Phra Buddha Deva Patimakorn” in a gesture of seated Buddha on a three tiered pedestal called Phra Pang Smardhi (Lord Buddha in the posture of conoentration), and some ashes of King Rama I are kept under the pedestal. The mural paintings in the hall depict Mahosatha Pandita (The Great Scholar of Mithila City, In Bihar State , in India), The heavens, and Phra Etadagga a disciple. On the middle tier there are two images of the Original Disciples, while the eight effigies of the Holy Priests stand on the lowest pedestal. Inside panels of the windows are decorated with lacquer work of the seals of these monastery dignitaries (in the reign of king Rama III).

    The second Buddhist architecture is called Phra Upostha, (the main temple or Bot or the Assembly Hall – a hall used for performing the monastic ritual). For Buddhists, the main temple is the heart of the monastery, as without a main temple, it would be a monk center and not a monastery.

    The main chapel was constructed in the reign of King Rama I in Ayudhya style. It was then reconstructed and enlarged during the reign of King Rama III. All sheltered windows and doors are made of hard wood with crown–like spires and colour-glazed tiles. Inlays of mother–of–pearl on the outer side of the entrance door panels depict episodes from the Ramakien (the Thai version of the Ramayana – the world famous Indian epic); while on the inner side are painted specimens of ecclesiastical fans of rank which are presented to the monk sovereigns.
    Please remember, the female and male must cover their legs and upper part of body as exposed body is not allowed inside the temple. They will provide you Sarongs and shoes to be left outside the temple! One must observe silence inside the temple!

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    Wat Pho or Temple of The Reclining Buddha IV

    by goutammitra Updated Nov 24, 2012
    Prang in the Courtyard
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    A prang is a tall tower-like spire, usually richly carved. They were a common shrine element of Hindu and Buddhist architecture in the Khmer Empire. They were later adapted by Buddhist builders in Thailand, especially during the Ayutthaya Kingdom (1350–1767) and Rattanakosin Kingdom (1782-1932). In Thailand it appears only with the most important Buddhist temples.

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    Wat Pho or Temple of The Reclining Buddha II

    by goutammitra Written Nov 24, 2012
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    Wat Pho is one of the largest and oldest wats in Bangkok (with an area of 50 rai, 80,000 square metres),[8] and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images, as well as one of the largest single Buddha images of 160 ft length: the Reclining Buddha (Phra Buddhasaiyas, The Wat Pho complex consists of two walled compounds bisected by Soi Chetuphon running east–west. The northern walled compound is where the reclining Buddha and massage school are found. The southern walled compound, Tukgawee, is a working Buddhist monastery with monks in residence and a school. Outside the temple, the grounds contain 91 chedis (stupas or mounds), four viharas (halls) and a bot (central shrine). 71 chedis of smaller size contains the ashes of the royal family, and 21 large ones contain the ashes of Buddha. The four chedis are dedicated to the four Chakri kings. The temple has sixteen gates around the complex guarded by Chinese giants carved out of rocks. These statues were originally imported as ballast on ship trading with China. The outer cloister has images of 400 Buddhas out of the 1200 originally bought by king Rama V. In terms of architecture, these are varied in different styles and postures, but these are evenly mounted on matching gilded pedestals. The main temple is raised in marble platform punctuated by mythological lions in the gateways. The exterior balustrade has around 150 depictions of the epic, Ramakien, the ultimate message of which is transcendence from secular to spiritual dimensions.

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    Wat Pho or Temple of The Reclining Buddha

    by goutammitra Written Nov 23, 2012

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    Wat Pho , is a Buddhist temple in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok, Thailand. It is located in the Rattanakosin district directly adjacent to the Grand Palace. Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimon Mangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan .The temple is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage.
    Wat Pho is named after a monastery in India where Buddha is believed to have lived. Prior to the temple's founding, the site was a center of education for traditional Thai medicine, and statues were created showing yoga positions. An enormous Buddha image from Ayuthaya's Wat Si Sanaphet was destroyed by Burmese in 1767, King Rama I (1782-1809 A.D.) incorporated its fragments to build a temple to enlarge and renovate the complex. The complex underwent many changes in the next 260 years. Under King Rama III (1824-1851 A.D.), plaques inscribed with medical texts were placed around the temple. These received recognition in the Memory of the World Program launched by UNESCO on February 21, 2008. Adjacent to the building housing the Reclining Buddha is a small raised garden, the centerpiece being a Bodhi tree which is propagated from the original tree in India where Buddha sat while awaiting enlightenment. The temple was created as a restoration of an earlier temple on the same site, Wat Phodharam, with the work beginning in 1788. The temple was restored and extended in the reign of King Rama III, and was restored again in 1982.

    The image of reclining Buddha is 15 m high and 43 m long with his right arm supporting the head with tight curls on two box-pillows of blue, richly encrusted with glass mosaics. The 3 m high and 4.5 m long foot of Buddha displays are inlaid with mother-of-pearl. They are divided into 108 arranged panels, displaying the auspicious symbols by which Buddha can be identified like flowers, dancers, white elephants, tigers and altar accessories. Over the statue is a seven tiered umbrella representing the authority of Thailand. There are 108 bronze bowls in the corridor indicating the 108 auspicious characters of Buddha. People drop coins in these bowls as it is believed to bring good fortune, and to help the monks maintain the Wat. Though the reclining Buddha is not a pilgrimage center, it remains an object of popular piety.( Part of the History from Wikipedia)

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    Wat Pho "Thai Massage" (3)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 15, 2012

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    Final Part to of My Wat Pho Tips with more Pictures

    First of all, Thai Massage is not EROTIC or sexual, it is wholesome and soothing, what Bangkok became notorious is the TURKISH BATH/BODY MASSAGE wherein both masseuse and client are naked and the masseuse massages the client using soap or oil via her private parts! GET IT!

    Most tourists don't get past the temple's huge reclining Buddha, but there is actually much more to see than the one colossal statue. In addition to the fine features of the Buddha's face, also of note are the soles of the Buddha's feet, 45 meters (150 feet) away from the head, which have been inlaid with mother-of-pearl to display the 108 auspicious signs which distinguish a true Buddha. Other attractions here are the thai massage school, Bangkok Chedis, Cambodian Style Chedis, Sitting Buddhas from Chiangmai Province. Wiharn and the Ubosot.

    Visitors must pay an entrance fee of 20 Baht (0.61 USD) at booths just inside the north, or south, entrances. If you are book in 3 temples tour or a whole day city tour of Bangkok, then the admission price is included in the price of the tour.

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    Wat Pho Part 2

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 15, 2012

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    Wat Pho
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    Part to of My Wat Pho Tips with more Pictures

    First of all, Thai Massage is not EROTIC or sexual, it is wholesome and soothing, what Bangkok became notorious is the TURKISH BATH/BODY MASSAGE wherein both masseuse and client are naked and the masseuse massages the client using soap or oil via her private parts! GET IT!

    Most tourists don't get past the temple's huge reclining Buddha, but there is actually much more to see than the one colossal statue. In addition to the fine features of the Buddha's face, also of note are the soles of the Buddha's feet, 45 meters (150 feet) away from the head, which have been inlaid with mother-of-pearl to display the 108 auspicious signs which distinguish a true Buddha. Other attractions here are the thai massage school, Bangkok Chedis, Cambodian Style Chedis, Sitting Buddhas from Chiangmai Province. Wiharn and the Ubosot.

    Visitors must pay an entrance fee of 20 Baht (0.61 USD) at booths just inside the north, or south, entrances. If you are book in 3 temples tour or a whole day city tour of Bangkok, then the admission price is included in the price of the tour.

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    Wat Pho "Thai Massage" (1)

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 15, 2012

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Reclining Buddha
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    First of all, Thai Massage is not EROTIC or sexual, it is wholesome and soothing, what Bangkok became notorious is the TURKISH BATH/BODY MASSAGE wherein both masseuse and client are naked and the masseuse massages the client using soap or oil via her private parts! GET IT!

    Part one of my Wat Pho Tips.

    Wat Pho (recently named Wat Phra Chetuphon) or the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, has the largest reclining buddha in the world and also is the birth place of traditional Thai Massage and is one of the most popular temples being visited in Bamgkok besides the Wat Phra Keaw (temple of the emerald buddha) Most western tourists don't get past the temple's huge reclining Buddha, but there is actually much more to see than the one colossal statue. In addition to the fine features of the Buddha's face, also of note are the soles of the Buddha's feet, 45 meters (150 feet) away from the head, which have been inlaid with mother-of-pearl to display the 108 auspicious signs which distinguish a true Buddha. Other attractions here are the thai massage school, Bangkok Chedis, Wiharn and the Ubosot.

    Visitors must pay an entrance fee of 20 Baht (0.61 USD) at booths just inside the north, or south, entrances. If you are book in 3 temples tour or a whole day city tour of Bangkok, then the admission price is included in the price of the tour.

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    WAT PHO TEMPLE AND THE MASAGE SCHOOL

    by white_smallstar Written May 9, 2012

    I was in Bangkok two years ago. To avoid any kind of massage I wasn't interested at all, I went to Wat Pho, the Reclining Buddha Temple which is also famous as Thailand's first university, and is center for traditional Thai masage.
    I don't know if the Temple is close to your area, but the Temple is an attraction you can't miss during your stay in Thailand.

    Thailand is a wonderful coutry. I envy your trip there.

    Sawasdee!

    *Nico*

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    Wat Pho

    by theguardianangel Updated Feb 24, 2012

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    Wat Pho is famous being the 1st University in Thailand and is the center for traditional massage.
    Wat Pho is located in Chetuphon Road, with its grounds split into the Northern and Southern section. The Northern section is where most people go and where the Reclining Buddha can be seen.

    You can find a temple hall, enclosed by bronze Buddha images. While on the Southern part is a less visited place where you can find a monk to talk with for a while.

    Thai massage costs 150 Baht for 30mins, 250 Baht for 1 hour. If you are interested to learn Thai massage, you can take the course for 30 hours, 4,500 Baht and can be spread 10-15 days. The center of the massage is located at the back of the wat and opposite the entrance.

    The entrance to Wat Pho is on Chetuphon road. It's open every day, opening hours are from 08.00am to 5.00pm, with a break from 12.00pm to 1.00pm.

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    Wat Phra Chetuphon: The Reclining Buddha

    by theguardianangel Updated Jan 28, 2012

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    46meters Reclining Buddha
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    Wat Phra Chetuphon or also known as the Reclining Buddha is located within the Wat Pho, it is the largest and oldest temple in Bangkok. It is gold plated, 46 meters long and 15 meters high. A reclining buddha designed to demonstrate the passing of the Buddha into Nirvana.

    Entrance fee is free. You just have to wear something decent, long sleeves are permitted so you can go inside the temple. The temple is sacred so just be silent and show respect while inside since people come here to pray.

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    Home of thousand Buddha statues

    by schurman23 Written Sep 30, 2011

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    The Wat Pho is called the Temple of the Reclining Buddha because it has the largest reclining buddha inside, but, the temple ground is surrounded by several hundreds or even a thousand buddha statues lined up along corridors. Going around it is just amazing. You can also see the buddhist monks wandering or praying around the area.

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