Wat Pho, Bangkok

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 225 Reviews

Tha Tien Pier, Chao Phraya River, Bangkok 02-221-991

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    Reclining Buddha
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  • schurman23's Profile Photo

    The Gigantic Reclining Buddha

    by schurman23 Updated Sep 30, 2011

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    The temple of the reclining buddha is a very large complex of pagodas, it houses of course the reclining buddha, the largest buddha Ive seen at 40+ meters long. It is easily accessible via the jetty pier in Chao Phraya river. There will be some folks trying to convince you that the temple is closed or that you have arrived too early for its openning, or for any other reasons...just ignore them and continue walking until you find the temple entrance.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    WAT PHO (Temple of the Reclining Buddha)

    by draguza Updated Sep 4, 2011

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    The Reclining Buddha
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    Over 200 years old, Wat Pho is one of Bangkok's largest and oldest temple complexes. For an entry fee of 50 baht, visitors can roam the grounds with or without a guide, stopping along the way at numerous notable temples and sites. The most famous of Wat Pho's relics is the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, wherein lies an impressive 46 meter-long gold-plated image of a reclining Buddha. A first grade royal monastery, Wat Pho is also Thailand's oldest learning center and the birthplace of traditional Thai massage. Take a Chao Phraya River ferry to Tha Thien (pier). The Grand Palace is a short walk from Wat Pho. You can also cross the river from the pier to see Wat Arun.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Wat Pho

    by IreneMcKay Updated May 1, 2011

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    The reclining Buddha
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    This was our third visit to the Wat Pho and it was as lovely and interesting as ever. In fact we were not intending to visit it, we were heading for the City Pillar Shrine then the Giant Swing, but it was so hot we went for the closest sight to the boat landing instead! To get here take the boat to Tha Tien.

    Entry is only 50 baht. Some parts of the site are currently undergoing reconstruction but it is still beautiful and the reconstruction does not spoil it.

    Near the entrance just past the ticket office is the huge reclining Buddha statue. It has a wonderfully serene face and beautiful mother of pearl inlaid feet. The statue is 46m long and 15m high.

    The grounds of the temple are wondeful and very extensive. They are covered in ornate pointed chedis, contain many statues- lots of which were Chinese originally and were once used as ballasts in Chinese ships. The grounds have around 1000 Buddha statues most taken from the ruins of Ayuthaya and Sukhothai.

    There is a second part of the temple across the street but we did not visit that part. The temple also contains a massage school.

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  • iyukase's Profile Photo

    visiting 9 temples (Wat): Wat Pho

    by iyukase Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    inside the main church

    for "Peaceful life"

    Wat Pho is most famous for the golden reclining Buddha that measues 46 metres and has feet inlaid with mother-of pearl.

    But don't forget to visit the main church inside, you will truly find the peace and beautiful of life.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Four Giant Chedis (3 photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    Towering over Wat Pho are 4 giant chedis honoring the first 3 kings of the Chakri dynasty. Each is about 120 feet high and covered in colorful Chinese ceramics, each distinct. The green tile chedi honor King Rama I and contains a 45 foor standing Buddha image damaged during the sack of Ayutthya, as well as relics. The white one honors Rama II, built by his son, Rama III. The third yellow chedi was built by Rama III during his lifetime to honor Buddha, while the fourth dark blue structure was built by Rama IV to honor his father. A high white enclosure prevented construction of further chedis.

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  • Robmj's Profile Photo

    Huge Buddha

    by Robmj Written Mar 18, 2011

    Wat Pho has existed since the 16th century, before the city itself interestingly enough. It is the country's biggest temple and has a 46m long reclining Buddha gilded with gold leaf. The buildings, statutes and courtyards are well worth the visit.

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  • Greggor58's Profile Photo

    Wat Pho…MORE EYE CANDY…a MUST SEE “ATTRACTION”..

    by Greggor58 Written Mar 6, 2011

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    Wat Pho,Bangkok,Thailand.
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    I enjoyed my visit to Wat Pho so much that I returned for a second time… I thought it was so interesting…there’s just so much to see here and so many great photo opportunities here. The complex that comprises Wat Pho is quite large, about 20 acres in fact and contains a few different areas containing a collection of Buddha’s image and carvings that is said to be the greatest in number throughout all of Thailand. Wat Pho is most likely known as the home of the infamous Reclining Buddha.

    The complex is divided by Sanamchai Road and one compound, the Tukgawee, is a functioning monastery where monks live and study. The other area is north of the road and is where the Viharn of the Reclining Buddha is located

    The Reclining Buddha… is an immensely LARGE golden plated Buddha that measures 46 meters long and about 15 meters high. Equally impressive are the large feet of the Buddha, which are inlayed with tiny representations of the 108 “auspicious characteristics” of Buddha. At 5 meters long and 3 meters high they NEED to be this large to illustrate the detail of the tiny Buddha images.

    As you approach the Viharn of the Reclining Buddha, where the giant Buddha is kept, you’ll see a line up at the front of the building where people are funneled into an entrance, scrutinized for proper dress; theoretically you must comply with proper dress codes and remove your shoes to enter. It was my experience that shorts and a t shirt were ok to enter with as I was not refused access wearing shorts. My sandals joined the hundreds of others that were left at the entranceway and I didn’t have any worries about them NOT being there when I returned to get them after my visit. Who’d want them?? The line files past the length of the revered Buddha and along the way there are donation boxes that people will contribute a few Baht into. The line eventually goes past the feet and back around the other side and out the door where you can find your shoes again.

    The Reclining Buddha is the focal point of the entire complex but there is other less notable but nonetheless beautiful Ubosots and Chedi and statues located throughout the complex. I didnt get inside of the Phra Uposatha ,this is the location of another important Buddha, Deva Patimakorn. I did venture into the West Vihara where you can see Pang Nak Prok, the Buddha under the Naga's hood.

    After you’ve visited the complex and have had your fill of Buddha you can relax if you like with a massage that’s offered here in a part of the complex where the “Traditional Medicine and Massage School” is located. You can have a regular “Thai” massage for only 250 Baht and hour…roughly the equivalent of about $ 8.00 Canadian or USA dollars.

    The present day Way Pho is yet another “incarnation” of a much older temple called Wat Phodharam that was located on this site for certain about 1300 A.D. Over the years many temples including Wat Pho have been added onto and renovated and re-modeled and Wat Pho is certainly no exception to this fact.. King Rama 1 directed the renovation of Wat Phodharam during his reign between the years 1782 and 1809 and declared the creation of this, Wat Pho, a royal monastery. During the subsequent reign of King Rama 111 the most major renovation and expansion work occurred and what you actually see today is a complex that has last undergone a “sprucing up” during the Bicentennial of Bangkok in 1982. At present there is a remodeling of the Viharn of the Reclining Buddha and you might encounter some unsightly but necessary tarps covering some parts of the building.

    DO make this a stopover on your discovery of Bangkok, in fact if you have limited time here and you have to choose…I hope you include Wat Pho and the Reclining Buddha as a stopover, you’ll be happy that you did!

    I’ve read that access is from 0900 AM until 2100 PM but the sign at the entrance way to the complex indicates that it is open from 0800 AM until 2100 PM.

    Access is only 50 Baht unless you are a Thai citizen in which case entry is without cost.

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  • vpas's Profile Photo

    Drink in the culture and reverence

    by vpas Written Jan 19, 2011

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    Wat Pho is the temple where the statue of the reclining Buddha is enshrined.This is a magnificient statue which is 46 metres wide and 15 metres tall.The feet of the Buddha depict the different chakras in the body and auspicious symbols.
    Besides this,Wat Pho also has the stupas where the ashes of the Thai kings are kept.These stupas are adorned with porcelein decorations and are very beautiful.
    The Wat Pho is also the seat of authentic,traditional Thai massage techniques and has depictions of the human body and anatomy.

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  • snailmail's Profile Photo

    thai massage

    by snailmail Updated Nov 21, 2010

    i went to wat pho (the reclining budha temple) and found the thai massage centre there is highly recommended. later i just knew that thai massage was firstly learned at wat pho some hundred years ago.

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  • Temple of Reclining Buddha

    by volopolo Updated Jul 31, 2010

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    Wat Pho
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    Wat Pho
    "The Temple of Reclining Buddha"

    Located near Grand Palace. Wat Pho is the largest and oldest Wat - Temple in Bangkok.

    The full name is:
    Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn.

    The Reclining Buddha have:
    15 meter high
    46 meter long


    Information
    Name: Wat Pho
    Theme: The Buddha Image
    Close to: Wat Phra Khaew, Suan Saranrom Park, Chao Praya River
    Location: Ratanakosin Island
    City: Bangkok
    Pictures in the web: Wat Pho, the Temple of Reclining Buddha
    Admission Fee: I pay last time 20 baht
    Last Visit: February 2009


    My Photos
    First Photo: The Reclining Buddha
    Second photo: Wat Pho
    Third photo: The Reclining Buddha
    Forth photo: Wat Pho
    Fifth photo: The Reclining Buddha

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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Wat Pho

    by Maria81 Updated Dec 4, 2009

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    Inside the grounds of Wat Pho

    Naming Names

    The temple's actual name: 'Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimon Mangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan '

    My reaction: there is no way I will ever manage to even pronounce, let alone remember, the whole of it!

    About Wat Pho

    Wat Pho is one of the largest and oldest wats in Bangkok , and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images - it would certainly take one more than a day to find all of them! The main one, however, is one of the largest single Buddha images: the Reclining Buddha (more on that in my first tip)

    The Main Sights:

    - Reclining Buddha
    - The other 1,000+ Buddha images :)
    - Medicine Pavilion
    - Chedi Rai
    - Prangs and stone giants - too numerous to count

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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    The Reclining Buddha

    by Maria81 Updated Dec 4, 2009

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    The reclining Buddha statue

    Description:

    The gold plated reclining Buddha is 46 meters long and 15 meters high, and is designed to illustrate the passing of the Buddha into nirvana. The feet and the eyes are engraved with mother-of-pearl decoration, and the feet also show the 108 auspicious characteristics of the true Buddha.

    My visit:

    First of all, confession time: I am probably one of the few people who went to Wat Pho and managed to almost miss the Reclining Buddha.

    Isn't it what the temple is about?

    Well, not only, and I did not miss it anyway :) My first visit to Wat Pho was on the afternoon of a 2-day trip to Bangkok, and I was in a rush as the temple was almost closing. By the time I had explored the magnificent ground, I only had 15 minutes left for the big attraction. I had, therefore, only a very limited amount of time to explore the chapel.

    It does impress - from the outside, the chapel housing the Reclining Buddha does not seem that large. But when you walk in... the figure is enormous.

    The only thing to remember is respect - it is, after all, one of the holiest images of the country.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Temple of the Reclining Buddha

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    Wat Pho (also known as Wat Phra Chetuphon or The Temple of the Reclining Buddha), is located directly adjacent to the Grand Palace. The temple was created as a restoration of an earlier temple on the same site, Wat Phodharam, with the work beginning in 1788. King Rama III told his nobleman, Krom Muen Pumintarapakdi (Prince Laddawan), to build the temple. After having moulded the image of the Reclining Buddha, the hall was then built. The image was made of stuccoed bricks gilded with gold leaves. The statue is 46 metres long, with the face of the Buddha being 15 metres high. Each foot is 3 metres high and 5 metres long. The soles of the statue's feet are inlaid with mother-of-pearl showing the 108 auspicious signs of the Buddha. On the inner wall of the hall, surrounding the reclining Buddha, you will see mural paintings of three topics: “Mahawong” (Historical annals of Ceylon) up the windows; “13 Savida Atadagga Disciples (Priestess)”, “10 Upasaka Atadagga Disciples” and “10 Upasika Atadagga Disciples” between each window.

    Open: 8am-5pm. Admission: 50B - no shorts allowed.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Reclining Buddha with Mother of Pearl feet

    by SLLiew Written Aug 31, 2009

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    At Wat Pho, there is a giant indoor reclining Buddha. It is impressive. You have take off your shoes to enter and allowed to take photos inside. But it is difficult as the Buddha is so large and the corridor around it is narrow and packed with queues of tourist.

    If you do not have a tour guide, it is worth to eavesdrop to other guides in various languages describing the significance of the mother of pearl inlaid drawings on both the soles of both feet of the Reclining Buddha.

    Derfinitely a must visit temple for all first time visitors to Bangkok. I have visited Wat Pho many times.

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  • malakingtete's Profile Photo

    WAT PHO

    by malakingtete Updated Apr 25, 2009

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    Talk about huge buddha? This is absolutely a big one! I've seen a lot of buddha's before but this one is different because it is lying sideways. Until now I wonder what that position may have mean on Buddhist religion. Since we were on a package tour, we were just dropped off and given enough time to see temples & buddhas. Anyways, before you enter you have to take your shoes off. I see some people burning some sticks (maybe incense because it smells like it) while they pray or meditate. There are some who are putting some donations (small denominations like coins) as they pass by. Outside we saw some monks that are uniformly dressed and I was surprised that their ages varied which included the youngsters. All the while I thought only elders are qualified to be monks since they have become wiser with age. Well, I was wrong all along... :)

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