Kanchanaburi Things to Do

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    Main Entrance to Cemetery
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Most Recent Things to Do in Kanchanaburi

  • maarrz's Profile Photo

    tiger temple

    by maarrz Written Nov 10, 2011

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    I have been here twice , and yes ,it is touristy , the second time i wanted to see if the money they raise is being spent on upgrading the tigers home and compared to when i went in 2008 it looks like a lot had been done .
    I reserve judgement on whether the tigers are drugged , they do sleep really soundly , but back in bangkok there were dogs sleeping on the streets inches from the rush hour traffic that looked the same , maybe its the heat in the day and the tigers are more active at night .
    I love getting up close and actually touching the tigers , the young girls that are there lead you to each tiger and take your photo with each one ( you get a lot of pictures ) and they tell you how to sit and where its safe to touch the tiger , so they seem to be quite safety minded
    Since my first visit there is now an area where the young tigers could play , it had like a moat in it so they could swim , i think you can pay extra to go and play with them
    i am going back later this year so i will see how the work is progressing , go and check it out and judge for yourselves
    there are also other animals wandering freely round the temple grounds such as deer , wild pigs , birds , buffalo

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  • zazatann's Profile Photo

    Tiger Temple

    by zazatann Updated Jul 29, 2011

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    SORRY, I don't suggest you guys to go to this temple any more. I disagree to use the word of 'temple' to make a business. It's all for business and they use a monk and tiger for a good presentation. It's a bad karma.

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  • Tiger Temple

    by Brian&Sally Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A facility where Buddhist monks look after orphaned tigers, and other wildlife. But, you get to be hands-on with the tigers. No chains, no fences, just you and a real-life Tigger.

    I'll let the picture do the talking. (picture coming soon)

    It's a bit out of the way but all the guest houses in the area run tours (you don't have to stay there to join a tour), many of which take in the temple or give you the option. When we did ours, we were the only ones on the minibus who decided to do the temple visit, all the others took the "train across the bridge" option, silly fools! They regretted it afterwards when they found out what we'd done.

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  • astro_kerryn's Profile Photo

    More Tiger Temple!!!! (Can you tell I loved it??)

    by astro_kerryn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The monastery's main objectives are to propagate Buddhism and to provide a sanctuary for wildlife. Its very first animal was a local bird species found in the surrounding mountain ranges, which the monks adopted. Soon other endangered and injured animals were brought to the monks, including everything from peacocks, horses, deer, and even tigers.
    The first cub arrived at the monastery in 1995 after its mother was killed by poachers, leaving it helpless to fend for itself. The monks rescued the cub, and while it didn't survive for long there were many more cubs and tigers to follow. The monastery now looks after a total of eight adults and three cubs, and the tigers have become a huge attraction
    During your visit you'll see the tiger's everyday life, from feeding to bathing or simply playing. Bathing happens at 2pm every day. The monks have a few tips before you visit the monastery and for when you are in close proximity with the tigers. Do not make loud noises, do not wear bright colours or perfume and most importantly, never turn your back on a tiger!

    You will be walking around with the tigers and you can pat them if you are game enough!

    Donation for entry of 100baht but pls give more if you can.

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  • winnietankl's Profile Photo

    The Bridge on the River Kwai

    by winnietankl Updated Dec 4, 2010

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    For anyone interested in 20th century history, a visit to Kanchanaburi on the infamous Burma-Siam 'death railway', is a must. You can even walk over the bridge, even though it is still used by 3 trains each way each day. The short train ride for about 10 minutes is 15 Baht.

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  • winnietankl's Profile Photo

    Tiger Temple

    by winnietankl Updated Dec 4, 2010

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    The entrance fee for the tiger temple is 500 Baht (around 16USD). The best time to visit this temple is from 1.30pm till 4.30pm as the tigers are fully feed and most of them are not so active at this hour and it is time for their `siesta'. Children are not allow to go near the tigers. Please dress respectfully in the temple, DO NOT wear bright, red, pink, orange and green shirt. For ladies, you must cover from shoulder to knee. You have to line up to take pictures with the tigers and there are 2 girls, 1 will take your hand and lead you all the way to the tiger canyon and the other girl will take pictures for you (your own camera). Please do not make any noise while taking the pictures. Those who wishes to take pictures with the tigers on thier lap have to pay extra.

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  • cameraholic's Profile Photo

    Bridge on the River Kwai

    by cameraholic Written Aug 29, 2010
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    Located 128kms to the west of Bangkok, Kanchanaburi's main claim to fame is the famous Bridge on the River Kwai, popularized by Pierre Boulle's novel of 1956 and the epic film of the same name made in 1958 (won 7 Oscars, 3 BAFTA Awards, 3 Golden Globes, etc).

    The bridge was built during WW II and now the track is developed into a walkway with side platforms, this allows crossing the railway bridge on foot. These platforms are useful as viewpoints and for avoiding trains (Orient Express passsing by this route !). A small tourist train runs back and forth across the bridge too, cost Baht 50 per person in August 2010, obviously Little Miss favorite part of the trip :)

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  • Tiger Temple- Don't Go!

    by JSims0282 Written Dec 4, 2009

    I had heard about the Tiger Temple from The Amazing Race and made sure to book a day trip while in Bangkok. The experience was surreal as you are able to touch and have your picture taken with full-grown tigers and cubs, however everyone in my group felt terrible that we had come.
    The tigers are unresponsive, and appear to be drugged, despite what the volunteers say. The emphasis seems to be on raising money for the temple, not on giving a good quality of life to the tigers.
    When we returned to Bangkok our Thai tour guide confirmed our suspicions. Everyone in our group regrets going and condoning what the temple does by paying our admission fees.
    The Tigers deserve better.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Tiger Temple

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    The Tiger Temple is located about 38km north-west of Kanchanaburi and was founded in 1994 as a forest temple and sanctuary for wild animals. It received its first tiger cub in 1999 and more were then given as either unwanted pets or left abandoned following the killing of their mothers by poachers.

    The deal, here, is you can get up close and virtually personnel with them and even pet them. The tigers are shown to the public in a dusty canyon where you can watch them from a distance, and when your time comes, the minders will take your camera and snap a few photos of you crouching behind the tiger, as well as a few close-ups of the tigers themselves. They seemed to me to be a bit drowsy and some campaign groups have investigated the 'temple' and have found evidence of them being drugged. The 'temple' claims that they are sleepy during the heat of the day and are more stressed if they come into contact with other animals. Whichever side you believe, the experience is still pretty unique and one you won't forget. There are other animals to see within the large compound such as wild boars, buffalo, peacocks, deer etc. It's best to take a tour to get here as local transport isn't good. Don't wear bright colours such as yellow or orange.

    Open: 12pm-3.30pm. Admission: 500B.

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    Chinese Cemetery

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    This interesting Chinese cemetery is located next to the Allied War Cemetery and is probably overlooked by most visitors. There's some interesting funeral architecture here as well as lots of graves to the Chinese who were conscripted labourers under the Japanese to work on the Death Railway. It is said that some 90-100,000 labourers died in the area.

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    City Pillar

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    Like many older Thai cities, Kanchanaburi has a city pillar that marks the original town centre. The bulbous-tipped pillar is covered with gold leaf and housed in a shrine which is also believed to house the city spirit deity, Chao Pho Lak Meuang, which is held in high esteem by the citizens of the town.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    City Gate & Wall

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    The city of Kanchanaburi was constructed in the reign of King Rama III in 1831. The city wall was made from brick and rectangular in shape measuring 210 meters wide and 480 meters long. There were 6 fortresses, 4 at each corner of the wall, with the biggest in the middle of the front wall that faces the river. The original city gate in this wall can still be seen today.

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    JEATH War Museum

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    The JEATH War Museum is one of two war museums in Kanchanaburi about the Death Railway, built from 1942 to 1943 by Allied POWs under the direction of the Japanese. The museum was founded in 1977 by the chief abbot of Wat Chaichumpol the Venerable Phra Theppanyasuthee. It is located on the grounds of the temple at the junction of the Khwae Yai and Khwae Noi rivers. The acronym JEATH stands for the five main nationalities involved in the construction of the railway: Japanese, English, Australian, Thai and Holland.

    The museum depicts the construction of the Death Railway and recreates the living quarters used by Allied POWs. The bamboo huts house a collection of photographs and items such as pistols, knives, helmets, water canteens etc. You can also see the large bomb that was dropped to destroy the bridge.

    Open: 8.30am-4.30pm. Admission: 30B.

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    Allied War Cemetery

    by Willettsworld Updated Oct 25, 2009

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    If you're visiting Kanchanaburi you should make time to visit the Allied War Cemetery to pay your respects to all those who lost their lives during the construction of the Death Railway. The cemetery contains the remains of 6,982 Australian, Dutch and British war prisoners.

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    Thailand-Burma Railway Centre

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 25, 2009

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    This rather moving exhibition details the story of the Thailand-Burma Railway and is considered to be the best source of information regarding the bridge and its construction. The centre has many galleries and displays, scale models, photographs, letters and maps plus interactive video screens and is very well presented. The price of admission includes a cup of tea/coffee which you can drink upstairs in the coffee shop whilst looking over the Allied War Cemetery.

    Open: 9am-5pm daily. Admission: 100B.

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Kanchanaburi Things to Do

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