Wat Chedi Luang - Buddhist Temple, Chiang Mai

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  • Wat Chedi Luang - Buddhist Temple
    by tim07
  • Wat Chedi Luang - Buddhist Temple
    by tim07
  • Wat Chedi Luang - Buddhist Temple
    by blueskyjohn
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    Acharn Mun Bhuridatto Viharn

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 4, 2014

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    Acharn Mun Bhuridatto was a monk born in 1870. He was famous in Thailand for establishing the Thai Forest Tradition which is a tradition of Buddhist monasticism where monks inhabit remote forest dwellings for meditation. In 1929, he was appointed the Abbot of Chedi Luang. He only served one year when he abruptly after his superior died. He spent most of his life meditating in forests around Thailand and Burma.

    This temple on the grounds of Wat Chedi Luang in dedicated to Acharn Mun Bhuridatto.

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    Phra Chao Attarot - the standing Buddha

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 4, 2014

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    Near the brick Chedi at Wat Chedi Luang, there is a viharn. There is a significant Buddha here called Phra Chao Attarot. This Buddha is standing with one hand raised shoulder height, palm facing forward. This is said to be the "Preventing Relatives from fighting Posture." That's pretty cool!

    According to legend, there was once a shortage of water in a river that ran between two small kingdoms. The people from these kingdoms were relatives of Lord Buddha. Because of the shortage of water, the two kingdoms were going to fight for what was remaining. Buddha knew that if he did not do something there would be great bloodshed. So he came to both kingdoms and asked "Which means more to you, water or relatives?"

    I wonder if this is where the phrase "Blood is thicker that water" came from?

    The people thought about this statement and decided it was foolish to fight over water. The Buddha's right hand being up prevents relatives from fighting and also signifies world peace.

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    The Brick Chedi of Wat Chedi Luang

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 4, 2014

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    The original Chedi was constructed in 1391 and by 1475 some expansion to place to it's current structure. At one point, this Chedi housed the Emerald Buddha for 6 years. In the mid 1500's an earthquake cause the damage that can be seen today. The original height was 84 meters but the current height after the earthquake is 60 meters.

    All 4 sides have a grand staircase leading to the top. I particularly liked the stone Naga's on either side of each staircase. There is a niche that houses a golden Buddha at the top of the staircase. It is quite impressive.

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    The City Pillar - Sao Inthakhin

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 4, 2014

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    The City Pillar marks the geographical center of Chiang Mai. The small shrine is located on the grounds of Wat Chedi Luang. Legend states:

    "Chiang Mai was a town plagued with demons. A hermit asked the god Indra for help and from the heavens came the Inthakin pillar to protect the town and the people from the demons. However, in time the people neglected the pillar and the demons returned and the town was left in ruins. In 1296, King Mengrai chose the site of Chiang Mai to be the new capital of the Lanna kingdom. King Mengrai found the old city pillar amongst the ruins of the town and was told the legend about the demons. He sited the pillar at the geographical centre of the new city in a temple called Wat Sadue Muang. Today, the remains of this temple can be seen within the grounds of the Cultural Hall (just behind the Three Kings Monument) in the old town area of Chiang Mai."

    Every year there is a festival to pay respect to the shrine. The Inthakhin Festival follow the Lunar Calendar but is usually sometime at the end of May or beginning of June. Unfortunately I was not in Chiang Mai during that time.

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    Wat Chedi Luang - Yang tree

    by Willettsworld Written Nov 28, 2009

    This Yang tree, inside the Wat Chedi Luang complex, was planted when Prince Kawila (1781-1815) abandoned the city of Pasang and re-established Chiang Mai in 1796. The plantation was believed to serve either as the "City Tree" marking the establishment of Chiang Mai or as a contemporary of the City Pillar which was relocated from Wat Sadue Muang to Wat Chedi Luang in 1800.

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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by Willettsworld Written Nov 28, 2009

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    Located in the centre of the old town, this wat contains the ruins of what must have been a huge chedi which has become the symbol of the city.

    King Saen Muang Ma began building the Phra Chedi Luang to enshrine the relics of his father at the end of the 14th century, but King Tilokarat completed it. The chedi used to be 90 meters high before it was partly destroyed in an earthquake in 1545; it was to remain the tallest structure in Chiang Mai for over 500 years. The present restored chedi is about 60 meters high. To the west of the chedi is a viharn with a reclining Buddha and the Sangkhachai Buddha.

    The large viharn was built in 1928. Round columns with bell shaped bases and lotus finials support the high red ceiling inside. The standing Buddha image inside is known as the Phra Chao Attarot. Made of a combination of brass alloy and mortar, the image dates back to King Saen Muang Ma (r.1385-1401).

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    WAT CHEDI LUANG (Royal Pagoda)

    by balhannah Updated Aug 13, 2009

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    I was lucky that the impressive Wat Chedi Luang (also known as Temple of the Big Stupa) , was on the opposite side of the road to my accommodation.

    This is an old Wat, built about 600 years ago by King Saen Muang Ma in 1391 to hold the ashes of his father. The building was expanded in 1475 to be its present size.

    The chedi was mostly destroyed within a few hundred years of its construction probably because of an earthquake in the 17th century, or it could have been King Taksin's cannons firing on the city to chase out the Burmese in the 18th century.

    The pagoda has been partially reconstructed, but the spire has not been touched, one thing, it would have been quite high when fully built.

    Wat Chedi Luang was also important because FOR A SHORT TIME IT HOUSED THE EMERALD BUDDHA, WHICH IS NOW IN BANGKOK. (This is the holiest Religious item)
    There is now a replica here in eastern niche of the chedi which was kindly donated by the King.
    Other niches have stone Buddha images and around the base there are quite a few Elephant Statues.

    SOME THINGS OF INTEREST.....................
    There is also a special pulley system which allows visitors to leave offerings and prayers atop the Chedi!..................AND.............
    To the left of the entrance is a very tall gum tree — legend has it that if this tree ever falls, a great catastrophe will strike Chiang Mai.

    This is also nicely lit up at night, worth a visit.
    If you happen to hear all the Dogs howling like I did, then you know the bell is being rung, quite a Din!
    Its one of the most impressive Wats in Chiang Mai.

    Wat Chedi Luang Replica of the Emerald Buddha
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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by tim07 Updated May 27, 2009

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    The temple compound is dominated by the huge ruined chedi, which is the tallest structure in the old town. The chedi dates back to 1441 & was once 90m high. It is rumoured to have been damaged by an earthquake or cannon fire.

    The chedi is not open to the public but there are many other buildings in the compound that you can go inside. There are monks to be seen in the grounds, it's possible for visitors to sit & have a chat with some of them.

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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by PierreZA Written Mar 24, 2008

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    A very impressive temple can be found in his Wat. There is a tall gum tree to the left of the entrance.
    The other outstanding structure is the chedi, which was severely damaged due to an earthquake in 1545. One can just imagine how magnificent this chedi must have been back then. There are some beautiful buildings and Buddha images. There is a reclining Buddha at the back of the chedi. Although not nearly as impressive as the one in Bangkok, it is still a nice image.
    It is worth spending some time here, as there is so much to see.
    You can also visit this Wat at night, when the chedi is even more impressive with its special lighting.

    Gum tree @ Wat Chedi Luang Chedi of Wat Chedi Luang
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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by yatingchen Written Feb 16, 2008

    The building of Wat Chedi Luang caught our eyes. You see and you fall in love with the historical architecture. Built up in 1441 and is more than 6 centuries years old. Elephants around it shows how meaningful the animal are for Nord-Thailand.

    Wat Chedi Luang means great tower temple. The buddha was transfered to Bangkok. Recently UN and Japan support to repair it.

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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by smirnofforiginal Written Oct 15, 2007

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    Chedi Luang, also known as Jedi Luang, was built in 1391 under the rule of King Saen Muang Ma (who was the 8th ruler of the Mengrai dynasty).

    In 1468 King Tilokarat made the pagoda (the chedi) the home of the emerald buddah which is one of the country's most precious and tresured treasures.

    In 1545 there was an earthquake which destroyed Wat Chedi Luang and in 1551 teh emerald buddah was moved away from here to Luang Prabang.

    When I visited this site it was under reconstruction, financed by UNESCO.

    Wat Chedi Luang
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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by PS_Lee81 Written Aug 21, 2007

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    I think this should be the main landmak in Chiang Mail old city as it is the biggest monument you can find. Nothing actually special about this wat except it is really huge and very old. People might find other wats more attractive because there seems like no renovation or upgrading works on this wat. But what you are getting will be the real wat aging thru the centuries since it was built.

    There are about 4 Buddha statues in the wat which are located high above the ground level. You cannot go up as it was fenced up. Besides that, there are also a few big elephant statues surrounding the wat. Some of them are missing or damaged. Then one side of the wat was also destroyed, might happened during the Burmese invasion long long ago as Chiang Mai will be the closest city to Burma (Myanmar).

    I believe there used to be a water canal surrounding the wat when it was first designed. However, it is now filled with grasses and what you can see is only dried up canal.

    At the backyard, you can fine the statue of 2 monks and sleeping Buddha. You are very welcome to chat with the local monks as they are very happy to chat wi you. You can ask them anything about the Buddhist religion, monks' life, Chiang Mai's history, etc...

    Monk at the wat The magnificent Wat Chedi Luang Statue of The Buddha and Elephants Sleeping Buddha My friend and me at the main entrance
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    Wat Chedi Luang

    by Linda_T Written Aug 4, 2007

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    The original chedi (pagoda) of Wat Chedi Luang was built in 1391 during the reign of King Saen Muang Ma, 8th ruler of the Mengrai dynasty.

    The already-massive chedi was progressively expanded until it reached it 280 feet (84 meters) in height in 1475, when King Tilokarat made it the home of the Emerald Buddha, the most important cultural treasure in Thailand (now in Bangkok's Wat Phra Kaeo).

    The pagoda was heavily damaged in 1545 in a major earthquake, just 11 years before Chiang Mai fell to the Burmese. It was never rebuilt, but a new worship hall has been added next to the ruined pagoda.
    Despite its ruined state, a Buddha image still graces Wat Chedi Luang's exterior, and it's not unusual to spot a saffron-robed monk bowing to it as he circles the chedi.

    The new worship hall at Wat Chedi Luang is decorated with naga (snake) and peacock motifs.

    To the left of the entrance is a tall gum tree — legend says that if it ever falls, a great catastrophe will occur. A small building near the tree enshrines the Spirit of the City (Sao Intakin) that was moved from its original site in 1775.

    Wat Phan Tao, also on the grounds, has a wooden wihaan (Spirit House) and bot (central shrine in a Buddhist temple), reclining Buddha, and fine carving on the eaves and door. After leaving the temple, walk around to the monks' quarters on the side, taking in the traditional teak northern architecture and delightful landscaping. There are often monks sitting at the table who like to practice their English and are happy to talk about life as a monk to you. I enjoyed my monk chats and look forward to returning to learn more about Buddhism.

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    Wat Chedi Luang or temple of the big stupa

    by Pat_Bangkok Written Apr 9, 2007

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    The construction of the temple started in the 14th century, when King Saen Muang Ma planned to bury the ashes of his father there. After 10 years of building time it was left unfinished, later to be continued after the death of the king by his widow. Probably due to stability problems it took until mid-15th century to be finished during the reign of king Tilokaraj.

    In 1468, the Emerald Buddha was installed in the eastern niche. In 1545, the upper 30 m of the structure collapsed after an earthquake, and shortly thereafter, in 1551, the Emerald Buddha was moved to Luang Prabang.

    The city pillar was built when the founder of Chiang Mai, King Meng Rai, ruled the city in 1296. Located in front of Wat Chedi Luang

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    Reclining Buddha - Wat Chedi Luang

    by imstress Updated Jan 14, 2007

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    Reclining Buddha or Pha Buddhasaiyat is an old Buddha statue. It is believed to have been built during the reign of Phra Muang Kaeo, the 11th monarch of Mang Rai Dynasty.

    The head reclines toward the south and faces the Grand Pagoda. It measures 1.93 m high and 8.7 m long, enshrined in a new pavilion built in 1955 when Ven. Phra Buddisophon was the abbot.

    The recling buddha statue can be found at the back of Wat Chedi Luang along with few other statue and architectures.

    The Lord Buddha always reclines mindfully on his right side and only one hour each night for the entire 45 years of his teachings.

    At the age of 80, before entering into parinirvana, the Lord Buddha compassionately warns the monks -- and also all of us

    "Brethren, it is natural for all conditioned things to decay and cease. Be diligent in working for your own deliverance."

    Reclining Buddha Reclining Buddha Reclining Buddha Reclining Buddha Reclining Buddha
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